Friday, 14 April 2017

Wendy's videos keep coming!

Now that incubation is underway, things will quieten down on the nest platform for the next few weeks with any hatching not due until roughly a month's time.
So perhaps it is a good chance for us to catch up on some of the excellent videos that Wendy Bartter has been making for us from her home in Kent.
So here are a few you may have missed and a new one from Sunday (16th):

This one shows two changeovers. First the male taking over from his mate and then the female doing likewise. He seems quite reluctant to give way doesn't he?

And here's an evening changeover where the male is again very reluctant to get off the eggs:

And some highlights from the day the last egg was laid:

And here's an additional video from (Easter) Sunday showing the male bringing prey in the early morning and then taking over incubation:



The Project Team

35 comments:

Wendy Bartter said...

Just realised that we will all have to keep close watch in case of a fifth egg surprising us ... I think the timeline will be from around 16.00 hours today??

Heather said...

Thanks Wendy for all your great videos. Loved the one where Mr P was refusing to get off the eggs. Mrs P is obviously so used to getting her own way when changeovers are concerned that it must have come as bit of a shock to her. Wonder what would have happened if he'd stood (or sat!) his ground. He's obviously very protective and good sign that they've bonded so well.

Yes perhaps we may yet have an Easter egg but think unlikely as she usually lays maximum of four, but you never know, especially with a new mate. It seems all thigs are possible this season!

Wendy Bartter said...

First changeover of 14th after Mum had been incubating all night since 22.30 ...
https://youtu.be/mO7fL2E_MpE

Wendy Bartter said...

Last of changeovers showing still four eggs @ 16.48 ...
https://youtu.be/ZGwPZRgU7mY

Anonymous said...

Great to see that all is back on track in Derby.

Wendy Bartter said...

Dad came very early to give Mum a decent break ... https://youtu.be/oRj3dBErvAc

Connie said...

Can someone tell me what happened to the previous Mr. Peregrine?

Helen said...

Hi Connie, no-one is quite sure. It is possible that he died of natural causes as he was of a good age or he could have been ousted by the new male bird. If he was ousted by the other bird then he could possibly have been injured or even killed. Unfortunately it's unlikely that we will ever found out. However, the new bird seems to have bonded very well with the female and is certainly looking after her and the eggs very carefully.
Here are links to couple of previous posts with a bit more information:
http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/a-new-male.html
http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/in-memory-of-fine-peregrine.html

Wendy Bartter said...

Easter Sunday early prey from male who then takes over incubation ...https://youtu.be/YZOsGx2IxMU

Vicky said...

I think it is quite funny that the new Mr P doesn't give up his turn on the eggs. The previous Mr P got up quite quickly when Mrs P returned. He knew she meant business. Maybe she is letting this one settle in and by the time the chicks hatch she may then let him see the other side of her. Nice to see he is very good about providing food and giving her breaks. Thanks for the videos Wendy.

Sj H said...

The Aylesbury project in the past has had a male that practically had to be pushed off the eggs by the female. The instinct to incubate seems so strong in some individuals. Like Derby, Aylesbury has a new male this year too and am uncertain if the new one is a mad keen sitter or not. I believe the incubation issue is one of the reasons for the females much larger size in this species - it takes a large breast to cover a normal clutch of 4 eggs during our cold nights. It sounds as if the new Derby male is one of the keen sitters. Maybe peregrine falcons are just like we humans in that we're all individuals with our own quirky ways.
While Derby is presently in the long incubation phase, Aylesbury should be nearing the end. That project is very lucky that Wendy Bartter has just stumbled on it and is very grateful that she may even be able to capture the hatch out moment!

Wendy Bartter said...

Certainly am trying SjH but so is Aylesbury cam,difficult & time consuming to get any footage ... not a bit like good ol' Derby! Sure that egg is imminent to hatch though, maybe by tomorrow morning!
BTW, it looks as if the new male there is ringed too!

Wendy Bartter said...

Derby cams down for me today ... is it same for anyone else?

Damo2012 said...

Nottingham have their first chick

Wendy Bartter said...

Great news Damo ... & so it begins ...

Lisa said...

Cameras working for me.

Just seen Nottinghams first chick, so cute!

Connie said...

Thank you!

Wendy Bartter said...

Double hatch at Bournemouth yesterday ...https://youtu.be/7TmyO6hj82U

Vicky said...

When do you think we can expect a chick?

Oak class said...

Hello, we are a Year 1 class from Derbyshire. Our name is Oak class. We have a few questions about the peregrine falcons.
How long does it take for the chicks to hatch?
How fast can the peregrines fly?
How tall are the peregrines?
What colour are the adult peregrines?
Thank you

The Project Team said...

Hello Oak Class: thank you for sending in such excellent questions. Our answers are:
The eggs take just over a month to hatch...something like 33 days but it does vary a little bit.
Peregrines, when they fly vertically downwards to catch their prey in what is known as a 'stoop' can fall at over 200 miles per hour (mph) making them the fastest creature on the planet. However in normal level flight their speed is more like 70 mph maximum.
Peregrines are not as big as some people think. They stand about 40 mms. tall.
Adult peregrines are grey on the backs, wings and tails and over the top of their heads. They have black markings on the face and especially have black 'moustaches' set against a white face. Their undersides are pale off-white with strong dark streaks. Their legs, eye surrounds and 'cere' (at the base of the beak) are all bright yellow in adults.
Hope that helps. Do ask your teacher to show you a colour photo of an adult so you can check that we are correct!
If you have more questions, then fire away and thanks for your interest in these marvellous birds!
The Project Team

Derek said...

I think I can now see 2 chicks at Nottingham. Also broken shell fragments at Woking

Wendy Bartter said...

Definite first hatch at Woking this evening Derek & three now at Nottingham plus a third one for Bournemouth!

Kate said...

Morning all
@ Vicky I would think we can expect first hatch around 1st May.( others will correct me if I am wrong)

Woking now has two chicks.

Oak class so pleased to see your questions as Team says do keep asking and learning about these wonderful Birds.

This morning our Bird was gently chupping, now whether she was talking to her mate, or, I like to think she is talking to the chicks inside the Eggs, letting them know she is waiting for them.( That is just me with a Granny comfort thought)CHOL:):)

Lisa said...

As of yesterday Nottingham has 3 chicks. Super cute, caught them being fed yesterday morning. Off there now...

Oak class said...

Thank you for answering our questions.
We think the eggs might hatch between 21st and 23rd May.

Can we ask a question about our own bird box? We have a nest with eggs. We thought the bird was a blue tit like last year, but we've just seen markings on it that look more like a great tit e.g. there is no black line across the eye, from the eye up the feathers are dark.
Can anyone help us please?

thank you!

kate said...

Hello Oak class
Am so pleased that you have Bird nesting in your box..
Haave a look at the RSPB link showing all the Tit Family. you can click on each bird to see larger image, maybe come back and tell us which one you think you have nesting.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/browse-bird-families/tits.aspx

The Project Team said...

Hello again Oak Class:
We think that the eggs may hatch a bit sooner than the dates you suggest. last year the first egg to hatch was on 3rd May. This year the eggs were laid about eight days later than in 2016 so the first hatch is likely to be around May 3rd plus 8 days = 11th May....give or take a day or two either way.....
Anyway it will be interested to see who's right won't it - so keep watching!
As to the bird nesting in your box: blue tits have NO black on them anywhere. Great tits have quite a bit of black on the head and a black stripe down their chests.
Does that help? Or maybe the bird is another species (type) altogether?
If you search on the internet for - say - 'blue tit images' you will see what that species looks like.....or there are bird identification books you can use to check up- we hope there's one in your school somewhere?
The Project Team

Oak class said...

We've investigated the bird in our bird box and we think it's markings match a great tit. Thank you for your help!
We have been drawing great tits this afternoon and we cant wait to draw and paint peregrine falcons next week!
We have enjoyed watching the peregrines on your webcams and we heard the bells. We are really surprised that the peregrines aren't bothered by the noise!

Emerald Class said...

we think the eggs mat feel wam when the birds or iincubatig them. this morning we saw four eggs. the birds are very good at incabating the eggs.

kate said...

Hello Oak Class... that is good you have been able to identify your bird.Well done.
The bells, to the Birds are a bit like you all in class, you ignore anyone making a noise etc, and listen to your teacher.

Hello Emerald Class, I am sure you are correct,that Eggs will feel warm, as you have probably noticed That the Mummy Bird has a very soft fluffy erm! bottom", that is a bit like a duvet, so am sure they will be kept very snug....Do you think the Birds listened to their Mum and Dad? and that is how they know how to look after the Eggs and then the chicks?

jack m said...

Hi my name s Jack M i'm in oak class, i'm showing my mummy this site, I would like to know what food they eat and how heavy on average does an adult peregrine weigh & how heavy is a new born chick
thank you Jack M

Anonymous said...

Tom in Oak class said....

Hello my name is Tom and I am in Oak Class. I am also showing my mum the peregrine falcons at home. We would like to know how far away from the nest they have to go to get their food please. Thank you that's our only question at the moment. Tom

Kate said...

Hello Jack and Tom in Oak class

Hope your Mums enjoy watching with you.
I have to go shortly and am sure the Team will answer you soon, In the meantime look at
FAQ@s

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/p/faqs.html

This will give you a lot of info on our Birds.

Keep watching, searching and enjoy these wonderful birds.

The Project Team said...

Hi Jack: peregrines are predators like lions, killer whales, stoats, otters and many more. So they eat other animals. In the case of peregrines they eat other birds catching them in flight by either flying up behind them and grabbing them with their large feet or by stooping down from a great height on them as they fly below.
They take birds of many sizes from small birds the size of a robin to larger ones the size of small ducks...and everything in between! At Derby we have identified the remains of over 50 different species of bird being taken as prey!
As to weight: adult peregrines weigh anything from 1100 grams (the females) down to about 700 grams - the smaller males. Newly hatched chicks weight only a few grams being very small and really just a bundle of white fluff!
Hi Tom: our peregrines normally probably do not fly more than a few kilometres from their nest to catch their food. Around the city of Derby there are fields, woods, lakes and rivers all of which have birds in them so the peregrines have plenty of prey to choose from.
They also feed at night using the floodlighting. Birds flying or migrating over above the tower of the cathedral show up as white dots in the sky when they are lit from below. The peregrines fly up and snatch them from the night sky!
The Project Team