Thursday, 16 July 2009

Webcam update (Updated)

Derby Cathedral stained glass window
An IT engineer arrived today to replace our faulty Cisco 1200 series wireless bridge. This is the radio link that connects the Cathedral to Derby City Council's networks, and thence to the big wide world.
Unfortunately it is dead in the water but the replacement unit had not been shipped out in advance as the engineer believed. So there was nothing to replace it with. We will have to wait until next week now before they can return and configure the new system.
We'll keep you informed if there are likely to be any further problems.

24 comments:

Pax Canada said...

@ Colin, ah now I understand the
name :) makes perfect sense, like Anne I think we all name them in our minds.I am so glad she is in your care.As Shakespeare said
"A rose is a rose by any name"

Karen Anne said...

Thanks for the update.

Phoebe said...

That's great news I hope they get fixed. I have missed seeing the peregrines and can't wait to see them again. Good news that it's covered on the maintenance plan!

Terry, Herts UK said...

Considering the massive commitment Colin has made, I agree that Colin should of, and needed to name her. 'Cathy' is much better than '010', now she is not a wild bird (though hardly a pet!).

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Fingers crossed that the video camera feed will soon be fixed then. Meantime, I clearly don't have enough to do so am checking out Shakespeare quotes. That rose one is from Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2) and goes
"What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" - the gist of course being exacly as Pax Canada said! I wonder if Shakespeare had anything to say about peregrines ....

Tom Stephenson said...

The most horrible line in Shakespeare?

"Oh horrible, most horrible..."

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

There's a challenge for you @Sue - reserch the references to peregrines in Shakespeare's works.
I've just found this one in Romeo & Juliet, but not sure if tassel-gentle refers to a peregrine or a goshawk.

[Enter JULIET again]
JULIET: Hist! Romeo, hist! O for a falc'ner's voice
To lure this tassel gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than
With repetition of "My Romeo!"

Tom Stephenson said...

My home town of Bath was also home to Adelard of Bath, a monk who introduced the concept of zero into European mathematics, brought back from Arabia about 1000 years ago. He was also an expert falconer (falcons were called 'gentles' for some reason), and produced a treatise on the nurture of falcons which I could scan and post up if anyone is interested.

Anonymous said...

Don't know about peregrines, but a recent RSPB article pointed out that Shakespeare was one of the first to comment on the red kite's habit of stealing colourful washing to decorate its nest -
"when the kite builds, look to lesser linen" A Winter's Tale, Act 4 Scene 3.

Sue C

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

I'm afraid not much effcrt has been devoted to locating the remaining peregrine juveniles recently since this gets harder and harder to do successfully as the parent birds take them further away from the cathedral and also as the young birds become more independent of them.
As I said before, there have been no recent sightings of both the remaining male juvenile birds but that doesn't mean that they aren't still out there somewhere.
Any news of someone seeing both will be reported here but, as we have said before, there are entirely wild birds.
The parent birds came to Derby of their own volition. Our 'intervention' with 010 is the exception to the rule that they must fend for themselves.
And, as we have said mnay times, the survival rate of the young birds is likely to be very low.
Nick B (DWT)

Anonymous said...

Hi All, I'm a Long time follower of the web cams and blog but this is the first time I've left a comment. I was in Derby last Friday morning (10th July) and took a walk up to the cathedral to see if any of the birds were around. On my way up Irongate I saw two peregrines performing some playfull acrobatics in the air before drifting away over town, although I didn't have my bin's to hand I was fairly certain these were the two male juveniles. This seemed to be confirmed when I found both adult birds present on the cathedral tower when I arrived at the cathedral green a couple of minutes later. So it would seem that both remaining juveniles and both adults were in good health last Friday! Apologie's for taking so long to post this good news.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

I took a trip to Chichester yesterday (silly me, should have gone to Derby) to check out their peregrine situation .... and I saw .... absolutely nothing, other than loads of seagulls and feral pigeons. So, it's fairly typical I guess that peregrines will start pereginating away at this time - but great to see "Long Time Follower's" news. I have been promised I can visit Derby the weekend after next so I hope for sightings then. I just checked out the CQ website (here - http://www.derbycathedralquarter.co.uk/index.asp) and have noticed that the Cathedral is looking for sponsors to help refurbish the clock. The cathedral has always been a great partner with the Peregrine Project, maybe some of us birders could help them in return as a thank you. I've not had much time to "Brush up my Shakespeare" yet, but yes, well done Sue C for reminding me about the red kite reference.
Incidentally, I also saw a small piece of news about Chichester. One of their 2007 birds has taken up residence in Cambridge City Centre, 120 miles away. They have ringes 23 birds in all, so Derby has quite a few to catch up.
Fingers crossed for the webcam today ....

Terry, Herts UK said...

evil 1

evil 2

Unfortunately, the persecution continues.

Karen Anne said...

Thanks for the update, Anon!

Any word on the camera fix? (Two weeks - I'm glad those tech guys are not supporting a hospital or something :-)

Sue C, Sussex said...

To Sue in Bucks - Sorry you missed the Chichester peregrines, they are also spending most of the day out of town now.

You may know this already, but the best place I've found for keeping up with Chichester is here:
http://www.chichesterperegrines.co.uk/blog.htm

The project does not seem to have an official site/blog, this one is run by a local photographer - good pics and informative blog.

Terry, Herts UK said...

@Karen Anne
This is the way things are going in the UK and many other countries due to the economic situation. Councils & businesses have to cut their costs; in turn, the service companies have to cut theirs to stay in existence.

I'm sure I don't need to spell out who is to blame !

Anonymous said...

Peregrine seen over Shardlow gravel pits at 6:00 p.m. this evening. Unable to determine whether an adult or juvenile.

Phoebe said...

I went to Casrsington Reservoir today and in the log book at Sheepwash Hide there was a sighting of a juvenile peregrine on 14th July! Is it possible it could be from Derby Cathedral?

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

@Sue C, Sussex - yes, I knew the juvs would have long ago fledged but I was suprised not to see any mention at all of peregrines around the town. I didn't know about the Internet site, so thanks for that. I originally heard about the site when it was featured on "The One Show" on the telly. I'm interested in urban peregrines generally and another favourite place of mine is Lincoln. As I've said lots of times before, Derby is my absolute favourite though, not least for the way the project team done so much to share it with anyone who has an interest.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Wow! Checked out that Chichester site and there are some stunning pictures on it! I can't work out how to put comments on the blog though (it's not as easy to use as this one!!) Forgot to mention, our trip to Chichester wasn't totally uneventful - we had a bit of excitement when my husband got a painful wasp sting! Hey ho.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Not sure if the administrators meant to completely disable blog entries on the most recent entry (the one above this one) but I want to support what was said. As is obvious from my blog name, I don't live in Derbyshire, butI joined my local Trust (BBOWT, Bucks Berks and Oxon) directly as a result of the Derby Peregrine Project. We're all marching the same way and I felt I can do more locally than in Derbyshire (although I'm more than happy to volunteer for a peregrine watch or two next season - DWT, you have my personal email address) I like to think of myself as an "honorary" DWT member and frind of Derby Council and Cathedral too and will always support this wonderful Peregrine Project, long may it thrive.
Membership of BBOWT has given me a lot of pleasure - the highlight being my local reserve, "College Lake", featuring on TV's "Springwatch" when polecats were discovered there.

Karen Anne said...

Terry, In the U.S. too. Our town is now sending out various bills once a year with quarterly coupons to pay, vs. four times a year, to save postage, and I just noticed yesterday that the transfer station went from six days a week to three.

Kind of makes me wonder, though, I calculated out that the bill mailing change saved about $20,000, why didn't anyone think of that before the recession? I don't waste money at home, the town shouldn't waste money, esp. My money as a taxpayer, we have incredibly high taxes here.

I hope we come out of this mess with a less buy everything life.

Karen Anne said...

The Derbyshire Trust link in the next post (not the link to the blog) takes paypal donations. How much easier can it get to donate :-) Every tiny amount helps.

Anonymous said...

I've just got back after a month away and the first thing I did was to check the site. I was sad to learn of the death of 09 and the injury to 010. It's always upsettting when you have followed their lives from egg to fledge.
Today I shall donate again and join the DWT.

Incidentally, I was fascinated, as usual, in the SW of France by glow worms. This time I have looked them up. What an enormous number of species there are. One site mentioned a certain Nick M who is an enthusiast and expert. This must be our Nick M. Please confirm.

I'm off now to mug up bioluminescence.

EH