Sunday, 1 March 2009

Calendar of the Breeding Season

Looking back through the public archives of this blog, we've drawn up a Calendar of the main events of the breeding season of Derby's peregrine falcons over the last two years.

It's going to be hard to guess whether or not they will be a few days earlier this year, as we might expect from an increasingly experienced female bird. We have to balance this against any delay that Britain's much colder winter this year might cause. All guesses, of course, are welcome in our comments.



All was quiet on the nest platform al 11pm when this snapshot was taken.
Website feedback minisurvey
How did you find this site, what were you looking for and what do you think of the experience?
Renaissance East Midlands works with museums to help them be the best they can for visitors, staff, volunteers and the community. We are keen to help improve museum websites by finding out how well they are meeting users’ needs at the moment.
Once you have finished your visit to this website, please spare five minutes to share your thoughts by filling in this quick survey. To say thank you for your help, you will have the chance to enter a prize draw for £100 at the end of the survey (July 2009)

27 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good luck to all involed for 2009
breeding season, keep up the sterling work. Hope to get down with the camera again.
Regards
Colin

Ash said...

You might consider adding to your events list, Number of Eggs laid and number of eggs hatched. Not sure whether this is also influenced by the experience of the mother

Anonymous said...

Terry's tip seems to work with windows internet explorer as well.
Question: Why do peregrines perch facing inwards all the time? Do other raptures do the same?

Bob of Fife

RICHARD LONGSTAFF said...

Reply to Ash.Other raptors do behave in this way, kestrels are a noted species to behave in this way. The reason could be related to weather and also if the bird as fed. A bird that is on the look out for food will be scanning the area, a full bird will be resting.Richard.

RICHARD LONGSTAFF said...

Could some one from the project tell me if the falcon or the tiercel is doing the most hunting? In many cases the falcon is the main food provider I wonder if this is the case with your birds?

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Richard: the male does most of the hunting once the breeding season kicks in - and all of it when the female is doing the lion's share of the incubating and looking after (brooding) the small chicks. When the chicks get bigger then the female joins in the hunting too.
Ash: re. facing in or out: I'm not sure why they often face in - it may be more comfortable with their tails not catching on the tray contents perhaps?
Obviously they have very mobile necks and can turn round to look outwards even if they are facing inwards.....generally they prefer to face into any wind so I suspect they only face inwards in the absence of any wind on that side of the tower....room for some research here I think!
Nick Brown (Derbyshire Wildlife Trust)

RICHARD LONGSTAFF said...

Thankyou Nick for the information. I was reading in a book called "Pursuit Of The Perregrine" that the male(Tiercel) can be very lazy outside of the breeding season and will let the Falcon do all the work.This sounds like a typical bloke. Thanks once again.Richard.

Robert said...

The reason for facing outwards could be in order to keep the plumage in good dirt free condition. Any bird needs to have perfect plumage in order to fly without wasting energy. In the case of raptors plumage is vital for hunting and thus feeding.

Karen Anne said...

Peregrine at the pudding cam.

Anonymous said...

Lovely to see both peregrines basking in the sun, especially after yesterday!

John B (not the sloop) said...

I hope you haven't glued the tiercel to that spot down in the corner below the nest tray. He hardly ever seems to move from there. (Not while I'm watching anyway).

LYNNE said...

Peregrine on ledge below the Nest Box.

8.13 pm

Amy said...

2210 4th march one falcon underneath the nest on the ledges

LYNNE said...

Peregrine still on ledge below the Nest Box...

2 Degrees below freezing.

12.44am

LYNNE said...

Peregrine still on ledge below the Nest Box...

12.52AM

LYNNE said...

Both Peregrines Present.

1.30pm

Anonymous said...

Watching from Mississauga, Ontario, Canada....both birds still present

Anonymous said...

Thanks folks for all the comments about which way the birds perch. Since I posted the question, I've seen one of them face outwards way perched. The exception always proves the rule!

Cheers .... Bob of Fife

LYNNE said...

Falcon on Pud Cam

1.18 am

Anonymous said...

Bird roosting on ledge below box as I write
Pam (UK)

julie said...

Hi all! Been watching the webcams for the last few weeks on and off, but for the last couple of weeks I tune in every chance I get. I think the next few weeks I wont be able to tear myself away!! This is an absolutely brilliant site, and my sincere Thanks to all for giving me the chance to witness such a rare sight.

Froona said...

To everybody involved and the project members of course: a wonderful 2009 breeding season!
Watched the P.f.male yesterday digging, while the female was perching below him. Pics on my Blog, as usual. Eggs in Rome, Bologne and Amsterdam. Things are getting started!
Colin looking forward to your wonderful photo's!
Will be a pleasure to watch the Derby cams again

Froona

Karen Anne said...

peregrine at the pudding cam area.

LYNNE said...

Peregrine on Nest Ledge

1.46pm

LYNNE said...

Peregrine on Nest Ledge

1.35 am

JackiG said...

Froona, which Amsterdam peregrines are you watching and know to have eggs? I'm seeing little activity at the De Mortel Tower site and if you know of another please can you share it? I am already watching the Rome and Bologna webcams. Thanks.

Anonymous said...

Just logged on and the female stood up to reveal 3 eggs at 16:34 local Derby time