Wednesday, 25 July 2007

Unusual Views of Derby Cathedral.



Here are some unusual views of Derby Cathedral we thought you might like to look at whilst some of us ponder the fact that today our 200,000th web hit will almost undoubtedly be reached. All of us - the Cathedral, The Wildlife Trust, the City Council and of course its Museum Service - have been awestruck by the incredible interest so many people around the world have shown in our city's peregrine falcons. It was a pleasure in June to be able to turn off moderation of comments and to read all the topical observations and remarks that so many different people were making as they watched these magnificent birds in action and reported on their actions.

So that you can see the Cathedral's interior, local photographer Andy Savage has provided us with a link to one of his 360 degree images taken inside Derby Cathedral. You can click and drag your mouse across the image to make it scroll around inside, or hit Shift or Control to zoom in and out. There's an alternate version available here for anyone have difficulties viewing it. For an exterior shots, see this blog entry for July 5th

Of course, there are plenty of other people's shots of Derby Cathedral online, such as those on flickr like this one, or this one, or this one or this one.

And finally, here's a time-lapse video from the top of the tower, also taken by Andy Savage. I understand that Nick Brown plans to post some general views from the top of the tower in the near future to give visitors an idea of what Derby's skyline actually looks like. Follow this link if you'd like to learn more about a sponsored abseil in September to raise funds for Derby Cathedral. (Please note: all Streamdays cameras will be off line for c 1hr on Thursday at 5pm local time. More info here)


25 comments:

Karen Anne said...

The cathedral is gorgeous.

What's the significance of the gate inside the cathedral?

We really do look like ants :-)

helenhoward said...

what fantastic architecture and beautiful stained glass windows. What always amazes me is that these fine peices of art are hundreds of years old but were wtill made with such skill and minus the tools and technology that the modern world has. !!

Nick Brown said...

Views from the top to follow shortly as Nick M suggested.
200,000 hits is a great achievement so can I add my thanks to those among you who have helped push the total up so high!
Nick B
Ps Sad news on the flycatcher front. I found the single chick dead in the nest this morning, cause of death unknown. Perhaps the adults had over-compensated for the wet days by over-feeding on the sunny ones. Its belly was distended and perhaps the chick had intestinal problems, I can't be sure.
Just to cap it all, it's another wet day here in Derbyshire....
Nick B

Karen Anne said...

I'm sorry about the flycatcher...

Sue Hetherington said...

9:50 Wycombe
Hi Nick B - are you "Nick, Museum" or "Nick, Wildlife Trust"? (I suspect the latter as you don't have that gorgeous picture that I think appears for museum entries) I'm trying not to stir up a hornets nest of outraged comments again about going off subject but it's near nigh impossible to be interested in any form of wildlife without acknowledging the effect (negative at that) that mankind are having. I know we Brits are famous for talking about the weather but it is way out of kilter at the moment - and we have to hang in for a bit longer - see http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/ukweather/monthly_outlook.shtml
You can all laugh - I'm walking the Somme front line during the first week of August - I'm sure I'll get an authentic muddy experience. At least "my" swans are still thriving. The family of 7 came and demanded breakfast this morning. The cygnets are getting so strong now - it makes my heart sing! My husband is getting fed up with me continually stealing his breakfast bread to feed to the birds. Getting back on subject ..... how long do you think the peregrines will stay as a family unit? Is the likely thing that the juveniles will move on and the adults will stay in residence ready for next year?
Sue Hetherington

SueH said...

11:30 Just had a quick peek at the cathedral shots ... struck by the lightness of the interior. I don't have a faith ... but I always have a sneaking suspicion that if it ever came to me in a blinding flash, it would be in such a place. "Our" peregrines made such a great choice of home.
SueH

SueH said...

15:35 (ish) and the count is 200,010 - hurrah!
SueH

SueH said...

PS ... but no birds on the platform, I meant to say
SueH

SueH said...

15:36 (ish) and PPS - and I AM at the magistrates' court today and I will be SHOT!!! I hope my manager never finds out about this website.
SueH

Anonymous said...

200,000+ hits. Well done!

Does that mean that people have logged on 200,000 times or that over 200,000 invidual people have logged in. I'm not sure if it's clear what I asking - does it count as say 7 hits if you log on each day for a week or only one hit as you are one user? I'm sure I'm not the only one who has spent much time falcon-watching!

Anon - Derby

SueH said...

I don't think it knows who has logged on - eg If I'd logged on 500 times times today, not only would I have got the sack for sure, but I think the count would have increased by 500.
SueH

helenhoward said...

hi nick so sorry to hear about the fly catcher. It is such a shame but its natures way of trying to tell us something what I am not sure. Maybe it was natures way of saying with all this rain it would have probably struggled to survive. What ever the answer very sad all the same.
I have to agree with the fellow bloggers as I can log on six or seven times a day so I would be intrigued to know if there is any way of telling if it is individual people or the same ones keep logging on.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Hello All
Our monitoring system cannot identify individual people, but if you have "cookies enabled" on your computer, it can recognise a repeat visit by that PC.
We still count it as one "visit" if your second view of the webcams is within two hours of your previous one. If your visits are spaced more than two hours apart, we count that as a second visit.
Generally, 50% of our hits are from repeat visitors, and some people have visited well over 250 times. (It doesn't count hits coming from my PC, by the way). Of the 200,000 hits, at least 90,000 are known to be repeat visitors. (Probably most of them are helen howard and sue in wendover!) If you don't have cookies enabled the system can't tell if you've visited before, so you'll count as a first-time visitor.
Most hits are from the UK, then USA and Canada, with Italy, Netherlands and Germany and Honk Kong still providing frequent visitors. After that there has been a scattering of visitors from all over the world.
I hope this explanation is of interest to someone!

helenhoward said...

thanks everso for the above. I guess I have an acute case of pereguinitus the only cure being constant fixes of these wondeful birds!!
By the way 2020 and there is a visitor on the nest taking in the evening sun!!

Sue H said...

20:58 ... bird on the box!
Sue H

Sue H said...

I've been able to look at the images properly now (disgraceful, but lots of stuff is disbled on work's PCs) and I particularly enjoyed the sensation of rapidly falling towards earth in Andy Savage's film. It also helped me to orientate a little - I've only ever "virtually" been to Derby. I was quite shocked to see a river near to the cathedral - would that be the Derwent? I know it will be of supreme indifference to our birds, but how high is the river running?
Sue H

Nick Brown said...

It is the River Derwent Sue, a river that runs down the spine of the county from the moors, through Derby city and then joins the Trent some 10 miles to the SE. The water eventually reaches the North Sea via the Humber estuary, well to the north.
The cathedral is considerably higher than the river and totally safe I would say...but who knows what deluges are yet in store for us eh?
The Derwent is not as high as it has been before this year and there has been no flooding this last week in the city.
For now then, worry not!
Nick B (the wildlife trust one)

Karen Anne said...

I think there's a birdie on the ledge, I am not totally sure.

Karen Anne said...

Yes, definitely a birdie.

Anonymous said...

Pax. B.C. Canada 7.25pm
bird on the ledge below the nest

helenhoward said...

The Derwent may not have actually flooded the city but it has burst its banks on a number of occasions this year but luckily causing very little damage

helenhoward said...

6.55 am and there is an early morning visitor

Nick Brown said...

Yes, the male sitting looking out at yet more rain. He always was the one to seek shelter as soon as it rained hard while the eggs and chicks were in the nest. You could always find him tucking into that small dry 'cubby hole' at the top of the window above the nest. Meanwhile the female was on the platform getting soaked as you may recall! So much for women's lib!
Nick B

helenhoward said...

I could say typical male leaving the woman to it all or is it a case of daft female doing it all for the male!!

helenhoward said...

I could say typical male leaving the woman to it all or is it a case of daft female doing it all for the male!!