Friday, 14 April 2017

Wendy's videos keep coming!

Update 30 April: 
Kate in Devon has captured this nice screenshot of the pair with their eggs at changeover:
Screenshot by Kate
Wendy also captured this video showing a recent changeover:





Now that incubation is underway, things will quieten down on the nest platform for the next few weeks with any hatching not due until roughly a month's time.
So perhaps it is a good chance for us to catch up on some of the excellent videos that Wendy Bartter has been making for us from her home in Kent.
So here are a few you may have missed and a new one from Sunday (16th):

This one shows two changeovers. First the male taking over from his mate and then the female doing likewise. He seems quite reluctant to give way doesn't he?

And here's an evening changeover where the male is again very reluctant to get off the eggs:

And some highlights from the day the last egg was laid:

And here's an additional video from (Easter) Sunday showing the male bringing prey in the early morning and then taking over incubation:



The Project Team

69 comments:

Wendy Bartter said...

Just realised that we will all have to keep close watch in case of a fifth egg surprising us ... I think the timeline will be from around 16.00 hours today??

Heather said...

Thanks Wendy for all your great videos. Loved the one where Mr P was refusing to get off the eggs. Mrs P is obviously so used to getting her own way when changeovers are concerned that it must have come as bit of a shock to her. Wonder what would have happened if he'd stood (or sat!) his ground. He's obviously very protective and good sign that they've bonded so well.

Yes perhaps we may yet have an Easter egg but think unlikely as she usually lays maximum of four, but you never know, especially with a new mate. It seems all thigs are possible this season!

Wendy Bartter said...

First changeover of 14th after Mum had been incubating all night since 22.30 ...
https://youtu.be/mO7fL2E_MpE

Wendy Bartter said...

Last of changeovers showing still four eggs @ 16.48 ...
https://youtu.be/ZGwPZRgU7mY

Anonymous said...

Great to see that all is back on track in Derby.

Wendy Bartter said...

Dad came very early to give Mum a decent break ... https://youtu.be/oRj3dBErvAc

Connie said...

Can someone tell me what happened to the previous Mr. Peregrine?

Helen said...

Hi Connie, no-one is quite sure. It is possible that he died of natural causes as he was of a good age or he could have been ousted by the new male bird. If he was ousted by the other bird then he could possibly have been injured or even killed. Unfortunately it's unlikely that we will ever found out. However, the new bird seems to have bonded very well with the female and is certainly looking after her and the eggs very carefully.
Here are links to couple of previous posts with a bit more information:
http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/a-new-male.html
http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/in-memory-of-fine-peregrine.html

Wendy Bartter said...

Easter Sunday early prey from male who then takes over incubation ...https://youtu.be/YZOsGx2IxMU

Vicky said...

I think it is quite funny that the new Mr P doesn't give up his turn on the eggs. The previous Mr P got up quite quickly when Mrs P returned. He knew she meant business. Maybe she is letting this one settle in and by the time the chicks hatch she may then let him see the other side of her. Nice to see he is very good about providing food and giving her breaks. Thanks for the videos Wendy.

Sj H said...

The Aylesbury project in the past has had a male that practically had to be pushed off the eggs by the female. The instinct to incubate seems so strong in some individuals. Like Derby, Aylesbury has a new male this year too and am uncertain if the new one is a mad keen sitter or not. I believe the incubation issue is one of the reasons for the females much larger size in this species - it takes a large breast to cover a normal clutch of 4 eggs during our cold nights. It sounds as if the new Derby male is one of the keen sitters. Maybe peregrine falcons are just like we humans in that we're all individuals with our own quirky ways.
While Derby is presently in the long incubation phase, Aylesbury should be nearing the end. That project is very lucky that Wendy Bartter has just stumbled on it and is very grateful that she may even be able to capture the hatch out moment!

Wendy Bartter said...

Certainly am trying SjH but so is Aylesbury cam,difficult & time consuming to get any footage ... not a bit like good ol' Derby! Sure that egg is imminent to hatch though, maybe by tomorrow morning!
BTW, it looks as if the new male there is ringed too!

Wendy Bartter said...

Derby cams down for me today ... is it same for anyone else?

Damo2012 said...

Nottingham have their first chick

Wendy Bartter said...

Great news Damo ... & so it begins ...

Lisa said...

Cameras working for me.

Just seen Nottinghams first chick, so cute!

Connie said...

Thank you!

Wendy Bartter said...

Double hatch at Bournemouth yesterday ...https://youtu.be/7TmyO6hj82U

Vicky said...

When do you think we can expect a chick?

Oak class said...

Hello, we are a Year 1 class from Derbyshire. Our name is Oak class. We have a few questions about the peregrine falcons.
How long does it take for the chicks to hatch?
How fast can the peregrines fly?
How tall are the peregrines?
What colour are the adult peregrines?
Thank you

The Project Team said...

Hello Oak Class: thank you for sending in such excellent questions. Our answers are:
The eggs take just over a month to hatch...something like 33 days but it does vary a little bit.
Peregrines, when they fly vertically downwards to catch their prey in what is known as a 'stoop' can fall at over 200 miles per hour (mph) making them the fastest creature on the planet. However in normal level flight their speed is more like 70 mph maximum.
Peregrines are not as big as some people think. They stand about 40 mms. tall.
Adult peregrines are grey on the backs, wings and tails and over the top of their heads. They have black markings on the face and especially have black 'moustaches' set against a white face. Their undersides are pale off-white with strong dark streaks. Their legs, eye surrounds and 'cere' (at the base of the beak) are all bright yellow in adults.
Hope that helps. Do ask your teacher to show you a colour photo of an adult so you can check that we are correct!
If you have more questions, then fire away and thanks for your interest in these marvellous birds!
The Project Team

Derek said...

I think I can now see 2 chicks at Nottingham. Also broken shell fragments at Woking

Wendy Bartter said...

Definite first hatch at Woking this evening Derek & three now at Nottingham plus a third one for Bournemouth!

Kate said...

Morning all
@ Vicky I would think we can expect first hatch around 1st May.( others will correct me if I am wrong)

Woking now has two chicks.

Oak class so pleased to see your questions as Team says do keep asking and learning about these wonderful Birds.

This morning our Bird was gently chupping, now whether she was talking to her mate, or, I like to think she is talking to the chicks inside the Eggs, letting them know she is waiting for them.( That is just me with a Granny comfort thought)CHOL:):)

Lisa said...

As of yesterday Nottingham has 3 chicks. Super cute, caught them being fed yesterday morning. Off there now...

Oak class said...

Thank you for answering our questions.
We think the eggs might hatch between 21st and 23rd May.

Can we ask a question about our own bird box? We have a nest with eggs. We thought the bird was a blue tit like last year, but we've just seen markings on it that look more like a great tit e.g. there is no black line across the eye, from the eye up the feathers are dark.
Can anyone help us please?

thank you!

kate said...

Hello Oak class
Am so pleased that you have Bird nesting in your box..
Haave a look at the RSPB link showing all the Tit Family. you can click on each bird to see larger image, maybe come back and tell us which one you think you have nesting.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/bird-and-wildlife-guides/browse-bird-families/tits.aspx

The Project Team said...

Hello again Oak Class:
We think that the eggs may hatch a bit sooner than the dates you suggest. last year the first egg to hatch was on 3rd May. This year the eggs were laid about eight days later than in 2016 so the first hatch is likely to be around May 3rd plus 8 days = 11th May....give or take a day or two either way.....
Anyway it will be interested to see who's right won't it - so keep watching!
As to the bird nesting in your box: blue tits have NO black on them anywhere. Great tits have quite a bit of black on the head and a black stripe down their chests.
Does that help? Or maybe the bird is another species (type) altogether?
If you search on the internet for - say - 'blue tit images' you will see what that species looks like.....or there are bird identification books you can use to check up- we hope there's one in your school somewhere?
The Project Team

Oak class said...

We've investigated the bird in our bird box and we think it's markings match a great tit. Thank you for your help!
We have been drawing great tits this afternoon and we cant wait to draw and paint peregrine falcons next week!
We have enjoyed watching the peregrines on your webcams and we heard the bells. We are really surprised that the peregrines aren't bothered by the noise!

Emerald Class said...

we think the eggs mat feel wam when the birds or iincubatig them. this morning we saw four eggs. the birds are very good at incabating the eggs.

kate said...

Hello Oak Class... that is good you have been able to identify your bird.Well done.
The bells, to the Birds are a bit like you all in class, you ignore anyone making a noise etc, and listen to your teacher.

Hello Emerald Class, I am sure you are correct,that Eggs will feel warm, as you have probably noticed That the Mummy Bird has a very soft fluffy erm! bottom", that is a bit like a duvet, so am sure they will be kept very snug....Do you think the Birds listened to their Mum and Dad? and that is how they know how to look after the Eggs and then the chicks?

jack m said...

Hi my name s Jack M i'm in oak class, i'm showing my mummy this site, I would like to know what food they eat and how heavy on average does an adult peregrine weigh & how heavy is a new born chick
thank you Jack M

Anonymous said...

Tom in Oak class said....

Hello my name is Tom and I am in Oak Class. I am also showing my mum the peregrine falcons at home. We would like to know how far away from the nest they have to go to get their food please. Thank you that's our only question at the moment. Tom

Kate said...

Hello Jack and Tom in Oak class

Hope your Mums enjoy watching with you.
I have to go shortly and am sure the Team will answer you soon, In the meantime look at
FAQ@s

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/p/faqs.html

This will give you a lot of info on our Birds.

Keep watching, searching and enjoy these wonderful birds.

The Project Team said...

Hi Jack: peregrines are predators like lions, killer whales, stoats, otters and many more. So they eat other animals. In the case of peregrines they eat other birds catching them in flight by either flying up behind them and grabbing them with their large feet or by stooping down from a great height on them as they fly below.
They take birds of many sizes from small birds the size of a robin to larger ones the size of small ducks...and everything in between! At Derby we have identified the remains of over 50 different species of bird being taken as prey!
As to weight: adult peregrines weigh anything from 1100 grams (the females) down to about 700 grams - the smaller males. Newly hatched chicks weight only a few grams being very small and really just a bundle of white fluff!
Hi Tom: our peregrines normally probably do not fly more than a few kilometres from their nest to catch their food. Around the city of Derby there are fields, woods, lakes and rivers all of which have birds in them so the peregrines have plenty of prey to choose from.
They also feed at night using the floodlighting. Birds flying or migrating over above the tower of the cathedral show up as white dots in the sky when they are lit from below. The peregrines fly up and snatch them from the night sky!
The Project Team

lisa said...

Nottingham have all 4 chicks :-)

kate said...

Morning all
Aylesbury's Single EGG has finally hatched this morning.What dedication from the Parents.

Emerald class said...

We are watching the Peregrins but we are waiting for Swifts coming home.Swifts have to be carful going past the male Peregrin. Swifts may be ambushed by Halks aswell. We thinck that the Swifts might be back at the first of May.Eyes on the skys.

The Project Team said...

Hi Emerald Class: we guess you're off for the long weekend now but thanks for your comment about swifts.
The peregrines have taken maybe three swifts in the 11 years we have studied their prey.....so that isn't too many.
As you say swifts are on their way back from Africa and will be arriving soon in Derby and Derbyshire. These birds are declining so they need our help. When houses are repaired or renovated, the tiny holes under the eaves that the swifts use to get into the roof where they nest are often blocked up. You can buy nest boxes for swifts and put them up at school or at home.
If you or anyone reading this comment want more information about swifts or want to report where they are nesting then please email peregrines@derbyshirewt.co.uk or look at this website: www.swift-conservation.org

If you see swifts flying over your school or home when you look upwards during May do leave a comment here!

The Project Team

Anonymous said...

i saw a swift yesterday :-)

Wendy Bartter said...

Was very lucky to catch a changeover this evening ...https://youtu.be/wwI2S32waCE

Anonymous said...

Not sure if its mum or dad on the eggs but they seem to be panting away. I know the suns on them but i wouldn't of thought it was that hot on them this time of day? Is that normal, of all the ones ive watched ive never seen it before?

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Anon: I don't think it is anything to worry about. It does get quite warm on sunny mornings on the platform but there's a cool NE wind blowing today and we're still a long way off mid-summer's heat.
Nick B

Ruby oak said...

Hi
My name is Ruby from Oak class and I am showing my mummy & sister the Derby peregrines and I would like to know if they are warm enough? Thank you

Heather said...

Hi Ruby,
Glad to hear that both you and your mummy and sister are interested in the peregrines. At the moment it may seem a little boring until the eggs start to hatch but once the chicks arrive you'll see what caring tender parents they are. They are wild birds and are used to all sorts of weather and it's the same with all nesting birds at the moment. One year the Project Team had to lower a hot water bottle to keep snow from covering the nest site! Another year the female (falcon) stayed incubating the eggs enduring torrential rain for most of the time, so as you can see they are perfectly equipped to keep warm in all sorts of conditions. Do keep watching, I'm sure you'll find once the eggs hatch you'll be surprised how quickly the chicks grow!

kate said...

Good Morning all
Well Hatching day draws near. This Morning Saw Mrs P off for a short comfort break, 06.33 so a capture of the Eggs which I will put on the Group Flkr.

Lisa said...

My son and I was talking about what magnificent birds they are but how soft and gentle they are with the chicks while watching the notts ones being fed, such a fantastic sight to see and we are very lucky for these projects to be here! We come and check everyday, hes bird mad and has been since about 3, hes 10 now!

Lisa said...

Also where can i find the link to the flickr group? Thanks.

Oak Class said...

Ella H. (Oak Class)

Can you tell me how big are the adult peregrine falcons please?

Have the adult peregrine falcons got different shades of grey on their back, tail and head?

How long can the peregrine falcons fly for before they get tired?

Thank you.

from Ella H. (Oak Class)

Ella said...

Oak Class said...

Ella H. (Oak Class)

Can you tell me how big are the adult peregrine falcons please?

Have the adult peregrine falcons got different shades of grey on their back, tail and head?

How long can the peregrine falcons fly for before they get tired?

Thank you.

from Ella H. (Oak Class)

kate said...

@Lisa
So lovely that you and your son find these Birds so interesting and educational.
I will give you the links to several of This Blogs links, for Flkr etc. also on each page , if you look up across the top, or to the QUICK LINKS you will find all the information to help you, but please dont hesitate to re ask if you cant find something.

@Ella in Oak Class if you also click on the FAQ Tab across the top of the links I will give you find lots and lots and Q and A am sure they will help you.

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/p/our-webcams.htmlhttp://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/p/our-webcams.html

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/

https://www.flickr.com/groups/derbyperegrines

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Ella: the adults stand about 40 mm tall though the male is slightly shorter being a lighter bird. Regarding grey on the back, tail and head, yes the colour does vary slightly and is flecked with blacker markings as you can see on the web cams.
How long can they fly? That's a good question! In America, peregrines migrate away from the very cold weather in Northern Canada in winter to fly to South America so we think they may be able to fly non-stop for more than 24 hours. In Britain our birds stay here all year round - it's not nearly so cold in winter and there's still plenty of food for them. But I think if our birds had to fly anywhere non-stop they would probably be able to do so. In fact I doubt they fly for more than a few hours at most in and around Derby on any one day and probably less.
Hope that helps,

Nick B (Project team)

Lisa said...

Thank you Kate! Ive joined the flickr group :) I could sit here all day watching them. We have a couple of birds ourselves and one set is sat on eggs but i dont have a camera in the nest box, they caught us out lol def happening for next year!

Ruby oak said...

I would like to have seen the birds nest with a hot water bottle in :)
Thank you, we will keep watching.

kate said...

@Lisa
Well done hope to see you posting soon and after hatching on the Group,hope your own birds hatch ok, and as you say now your hooked, a cam at home would be fun.
do keep asking any questions someone will always try to help.

Lola Oak said...

My name is Lola in oak class . I like to know how big the eggs are? How big will the chicks be?

kate said...

Hello Ruby oak
here is the link to Hot Water bottle day

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.co.uk/search?q=hot+water+bottle

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Lola: the eggs are just a bit smaller than small chicken eggs - so maybe the size of a pullet's egg if your teacher can tell you what that is like.
The chicks, coming out of that quite small egg are naturally small too. Once their white fluff dries out they look a bit bigger but they still weigh really very little.
However they grow quickly on a diet of meat, meat and more meat and in less than seven weeks will be the same size and weight as their parents.
Nick B

Vicky said...

I'm not sure if I asked already and missed the answer but wondering if the scrape is smaller this year. I am looking forward to some chicks soon.

kate said...

Morning all
Just captured Change over and still 4 lovely eggs, (Pic on Flkr) the egg at front still has a pimple shape as Wendy and I noticed several days ago. Keep watching as am sure any day now.

Jack WN Oak Class said...

Can you tell me:

1. How far away from the nest do the birds fly to get food?
2. What is the best place for them to nest?
3. How fast can they fly?
4. How far can they go without having food?

Thank you

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Hi Jack: we have answered a few of these questions asked by others in your class so it would be good if you were to check whether a question has already been answered perhaps? I'm sure your teacher can help with this....
Anyway, here goes:
1. We are not sure how far the fly but usually less than 10 miles or so and often nearer. Outside Derby city there are fields, woods, a river, gravel pits etc - good hunting habitats.
2. The best place for peregrines to nest is high on a small flattish ledge on a cliff. That's their normal nesting place. Derby Cathedral to a peregrine is just like a tall cliff. WE put the nest platform about two thirds of the way up the tower.
3. In a dive vertically downwards hunting their prey they are the fastest animal on the planet travelling at well over 200 miles per hour. IN level flight they may do about 50 mph, possibly more.
4. Birds have fat reserves in their bodies which they can use to fuel their flights.
We know other birds of a similar size to a peregrine can flying thousands of miles non-stop when they are migrating. For example, an osprey carrying a satellite tag (so we can track it) flew from North Scotland right down to Spain in one go, taking about a day to do it!
If your teacher wants to know more ask them to email me at peregrines@derbyshirewt.co.uk and I will give them links etc.

Hope that helps.

Nick B

Emerald class said...

The perigrin folcans are good pairents . We think the eggs mite hach in an other week. They have not finished incubating yet. We are looking forwered to seeing the chics.it is goinng to be exiting to see the chics.

Lola oak said...

Lola in oak
I would like to know how long are the chicks staying with their parents once they have hatched?

Helen said...

Hello Lola, that's a good question. It is usually about six weeks after hatching before the chicks are ready to fly and leave the nest platform. Once they have left the nest the adult birds carry on feeding them for a while as the young birds aren't able to find their own food straight away. The adult birds teach them how to hunt by bringing in prey and dropping it for them to catch. At the end of the summer (around September or October) the young birds will leave and find their own place to live.

Jessica said...

So excited now. Not long to wait before hatching begins! Thank you for posting all the historical data in the table. That's great! I teach English to speakers of other languages and we are all hooked again this year watching and waiting. The learners love Wendy's videos and they prompt some great Q and A sessions! Thanks again to the team for this wonderful site and wonderful sight! :-)

Sara said...

Well done Emerald Class, I think you are right. The peregrine falcons are very good parents. They keep the eggs just at the right temperature so that the chicks grow inside them. Keep watching over the next few days and you might be lucky enough to see one of the chicks hatch.

The Project Team said...

Hi Jessica: welcome to the blog comments and thanks for your kind words.
Hatching is imminent we think with one of the eggs now showing a 'pip'....
Best wishes to you and your students. Perhaps they can tell you the names they use for peregrines in their own languages? There are SO many!
Best wishes
The Project Team

John Page said...

Three chicks having their breakfast at 08:05 on Sunday 14 May 2017 on Derby cathedral tower.
https://twitter.com/compagejohn/status/863655068993802240