Monday, 1 June 2015

Don't turn your back for one moment

Report on the (wet) Watch Point on Saturday 13th June. Helen Naylor, one of our volunteers reported that:
All three juveniles were looking fit and healthy during this morning's watch point despite the heavy rain! There was some vigorous wing flapping and plenty of preening taking place. One of the youngsters remained perched on the edge of the platform for some time giving us good views through the telescopes below. Both of the adult birds stayed on the hotel lettering for a while, until the male bird tucked himself away in a more sheltered spot on the cathedral tower! 

Some of the children and parents from Leys Junior School in Alfreton braved the weather to come and watch the birds after learning about them in class. Hopefully it was a great experience for them to see the birds for real!
{Meanwhile, inside the tower, Nick M spent two hours trying to find the fault that keeps freezing the cameras. He has an idea what it may be but fixing it will depend on Serco, the city council's IT management agency so that will have to wait until next week. We apologise for these problems}.
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Saturday (6th June). 
A good turn out in sunny but windy conditions. The chicks obliged occasionally by poking their heads above the front of the nest platform. About 1pm there was some action from both parents and a considerable amount of calling too.
A wood pigeon is sitting on eggs just below and to the left of the platform as you look up from Cathedral Green. The nest is exactly where the falcon usually likes to perch when the juveniles
are fledging.......what will happen I wonder?
It was good to see plenty of children today, including some really knowledgeable ones! Hope they go home and watch the web cams.....

Thanks to our volunteers, Hilary, Sue and Helen - sterling work!
A week is a long time in politics, they say. But it's also an absolutely huge amount of  time in the life of a rapidly developing peregrine. Having been out of the country for just over a week, Nick M managed to miss both the ringing of the chicks at around  21 days old, as well as last Saturdays first watchpoint (see previous post and below). He returned to sort out a few IT problems and to appreciate just how much our eyasses (young peregrines) have grown.
It takes just six weeks from hatching to leaving the nest - whereas in humans its around 18 years or so!
The video below was captured this morning and shows how well the birds can now move around, and how their first flight feathers are now developing.  Webcam Stream 3 has now been changed to reveal the 'far side' of the nest platform, so this should help when they move out of sight on the main nest camera.




THE FIRST WATCH POINT of the YEAR  - a report, by Ian Layton, our Engagement Officer:

Sometimes things just go your way” was Steve C’s comment as we held our first Watch Point of the year and the weather held good for us all day despite a dodgy forecast!

Cathedral Green was quiet when we started to arrive – but by the time we’d liberated a table from the Cathedral and got our scopes and everything else ready, both the town and the peregrines seemed to have become a little more lively. We were ready for folks to use the scopes by 9.50 am – at which time both adults were sitting on the lip of the platform.
Steve and I performed our usual role of talking to passers-by, while Helen and Hilary (the more knowledgeable half of the day’s team) explained to people what they were seeing and answered a whole range of questions from some about the young to others about the Wildlife Trust. Hilary was as well prepared as ever, having come clutching screen shots of the platform from the webcams. Meanwhile, Helen kept count of just how many people we spoke to.

The birds were quite forthcoming for much of the day – and the tiercel (male peregrine) seemed to be looking straight at me every time I looked through a 'scope! Even the youngsters made a few appearances throughout the morning – I would think we saw them peering over the edge five or six times much to the pleasure of those at the scopes at the time.
The adult peregrines often sit on the lettering on this hotel nearby
from where they can keep watch on the nest
.
By mid morning however, they seemed to get a little restless (peckish!) and the male headed off over the Derwent and seemed to circle over towards the cricket ground for a good while, whilst the female made a few shorter flights but returned from each after five or ten minutes – which we were most pleased about as without the adults we had little to show people except for the wood pigeon nest just below the platform!

By midday they were both back – though without any prey – and were sitting mostly on the platform though the tiercel kept drifting off to his favoured spot on top of the louvres – and on occasion flitting across to the Jury’s Inn sign to get out of the north wind that was blowing.

So the peregrines were on form – both young and old – as were the good folks of Derby. Even though the day was quiet and it was the first Watch Point of the year we had over 150 visits to the telescopes – including some people who had made the journey from Sinfin and Peartree – and who stayed much of the morning. We also encouraged folks from as far afield as Japan to view the birds. We handed out loads of “Urban Wildlife Spotters Sheets” and have even had a couple back already – not bad going as we were saying that Wednesday is the key day for feedback!

All in all a really good start to the season – and as always a huge thanks to the volunteers who made it possible – Hilary, Helen and Steve C.

90 comments:

Ann Chambers Hancock said...

Just wondering if there is a problem with the cameras? I can't seem to get on any of them. It keeps telling me there is an Internal Error. Is this my problem or are you have a problem? thank you in advance for your reply. Ann.

Peregrine Project Member (Nick M.) said...

Many a true word . . I turned my back and Derby Council removed all the redirects to our webcams today.
Please delete any stored bookmarks you may have, and use the new, updated links provided on our blog.
All our cameras are still working correctly! Honest!

Nick M.

Ann Chambers Hancock said...

Thank you Nick I see the cameras are back now, that is good news.

Abby-Lynn said...

I have been watching them for about 5 minutes. The girls are moving about and what I am guessing is the first born is exercising her wings and at times can't seem to close them so just flaps them about. The little boy is staying close to mom on the other side. Both girls are on the close to the camera side. They look huge compared to a couple days ago. Just love watching them. I am having no problems with the cams. All are ok.

Abby-Lynn said...

Mom just brought prey a few minutes ago and one of the girls grabbed it from her and got in a corner with it. Not sharing. The other female tried to take it but she just go into another corner and won't give it up. The little male didn't even try to take it. Mom just looks around and does nothing.

abby-Lynn said...

The females just played tug of war and the second one got it. Poor little guy is staying on the other side with none.

Kate Bunting said...

Glad to see the youngsters have survived the high winds of the past few days. How big they look compared to dad! I suppose it's the fluff.
I looked in on the watchpoint at lunchtime on my way to somewhere else, as I shall be away the next 2 Saturdays. Got a glimpse of a flapping juvenile wing over the platform edge, and was able to give some information to a couple of visitors from elsewhere.

Green Class said...

The female is very clever because she is giving the chicks some shade. By spreading her wings.Two chicks are in the shade on their own.The male is off to get some food.

Lesley Gerrard said...

Poor little boy chick. He is tiny compared to the females!

Abby-Lynn said...

I am very surprised this year to see one of the females grab the prey from the parent and take it to a corner to eat. The other 2 stay back. The second female is trying to get some but last year the parents fed them right to the end. I never saw any of the chicks run away with food. A very different group this year. They are wild birds and will have to fend for themselves one day but as young chicks they each were fed last year.

Abby-Lynn said...

Now she is feeding the 2 girls with the little guy waiting for his turn. I guess sometimes she just lets them go at it themselves.

Abby-Lynn said...

Oops my mistake it is the oldest girl that is waiting on the side or she has had her fill. They sure are big now.

Helen said...

After packing up the telescopes at today's watch point the falcon circled the tower a few times and then landed on the stonework below the nest platform close to the nesting wood pigeon. Fascinating viewing! The wood pigeon remained hunkered down on it's nest but the falcon didn't appear to take much notice of it! She seemed more occupied with her own brood, constantly looking upwards towards the platform. It will be interesting to see if the wood pigeon manages to raise some chicks.

Heather said...

Thanks Helen for the information regarding the nesting wood pigeon. As we haven't seen anything of them recently we all feared the worst. Interesting that the peregrines tolerate them and that they are possibly the pair that nested there last year.

Nick - any news on the analysis of the unhatched egg?

Heather said...

A very late night snack for the three juveniles. Am wondering if it's something the adult has killed at night, as we now know they can, or more probably prey that has been stashed away. Never seen them eat this late before but perhaps Abby has?

Abby-Lynn said...

Hi Heather, yes often around 1 am your time and even 2. Did you notice the juveniles grabbing the prey away from the adult. Not every time but I've seen it a few times. One of the females. The male is noticeably smaller so easy to pick him out.

Abby-Lynn said...

One of the chicks was flapping its wings so hard that down was flying all over.

Abby-Lynn said...

I feel sorry for the little guy. He isn't aggressive enough. Mr P brought prey and the oldest female grabbed it and took it to a corner not sharing. Then the second female got it and had some. Mr P came with more food and Mrs P grabbed it and started feeding the second female. The first female took the last bit into the corner again. The little guy got nothing. I watched it the whole time. He just stays back but I guess he has to learn to come forward or he will get nothing. when he is hungry enough he will come forward I guess.

Caroline said...

Great to hear that the Watchpoints are going well and many thanks to all those who make them possible. I hope to get down again sometime this year. The juvies are so well camouflaged at this stage, aren't they, with their funny mixture of feathers and down. Always a miracle to see how quickly they develop and take to the air.

Abby-Lynn said...

The oldest one was born almost 5 weeks ago so should be trying to sit on the ledge soon. Then off she will go in a couple weeks. Seems so quick. They are flapping their wings so much now.

Abby-Lynn said...

Another feeding and the male stayed in the back squawking like crazy and got nothing till finally he pushed past one of the females and now is getting fed. The females get right in there but he seems to sit back and squawk. Glad to see him eat.

Lesley Gerrard said...

I haven't seen the little male eat for days now. Wonder if he is very shy, or just plain lazy?

Abby-Lynn said...

I wondered too but I think he is intimidated by the size of the females and they do block him and one female is especially aggressive but I guess he will learn in time. Should be time for breakfast soon.

Abby-Lynn said...

Why do the chicks bob their heads up and down?

Abby-Lynn said...

Way to go! The little guy is getting fed first. Mom came in at the far end and he was right there.

Abby-Lynn said...

The little guy got pretty well fed then walked away and the second oldest female got quite a bit and then mom brought it to the other side so the oldest would be fed but the oldest walked over and took it away from mom and went to the corner with it. I think that is so funny how when they hide food it is in the corner and they still face the corner when they want to sleep sometimes. The 2 females are only a day or 2 apart but one has more coloured feathers than the other so I think she is the oldest.

Heather said...

I was just wondering same thing about head bobbing Abby and also noticed little juvie got first helpings but then left to join his sibling who wasn't interested in any food at the other end of scrape. Hope he got enough he does seem very timid but being a male (and possibly the last hatchling) he's so small iin comparison to his sisters they look like cuckoos in the nest!

Thought I saw one female regurgitate a pellet so perhaps that has something to do with head bobbing but I rather doubt it, perhaps someone can enlighten us.

Heather said...

Going slightly further afield, if anyone would like to see some magnificent photos and an article on a wonderfully dedicated member of the public who spent the night in a graveyard caring for a newly fledged peregrine and then again rescued it later on from some magpies, then google Sheffield perigrines, 3rd down or go to https://sheffieldperegrines.wordpress.com/

First item shows parent attempting to pass on newly caught prey to the other fledgling without much success - all part of their steep learning curve!

Abby-Lynn said...

Hi Heather. I also think, the little male juvie is a mama's boy. As soon as Mom comes he runs to her and stays beside her. I think it is so cute. His sisters are so big - they do "look" a little cuckoo! lol! I think he feels safe beside mom. Even tho the females are lying down, he is sitting beside mom. I love watching them. The adults don't bob their heads so maybe it is a juvie thing.

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Heather: re. head bobbing, Ed Drewitt's book (Urban Peregrines) disucsses this and my adaptation of his much longer paragraph is below:
The peregrine has two light sensitive areas in the eye, the deep and shallow fovea (we humans have only one). The deep fovea is thought to help with close vision and the shallow with seeing distant objects. Peregrines (adults and young) often tilt their heads to bring both areas into play, helping them get a better view of what they are looking at. In addition they head bob which also helps them increase their field of view. It does look a bit comical but certainly seems to be an important behaviour in these falcons.
(Owls also head bob....and none better than the little owl.....)
As to the unhatched egg, it was so horribly stinky that it had to be disposed of by the ringer. The post office wouldn't have been very happy to transport it!
Nick B (DWT)

Lorraine said...

Was just about to offer a similar explanation about the noticed head bobbing. I remember being curious about it last year and so I researched it to find out more. At this stage we can see at least one of the chicks is now becoming interested in the view beyond the scrape. We have seen how just a few days can radically alter the size and development of the chicks and this includes their greatest "asset" ( their super keen eyesight which is so vital for coordination when diving from a great height and at high speed, onto a targeted prey ) which is now becoming finely tuned. The head bobbing allows them to pin point and assess distance ( I think I also read that their sight is given over to two thirds of their brain! ) so they are no doubt fascinated by the images they can now see beyond the scrape. I suspect they are almost telescopic and take quite a bit of getting used to! I understand also, that if two peregrines get into a fight, they will make an effort to avoid each others eyes, due to their awareness of their vital need in survival.

Once all three are a little older and take to perching on the actual scrape edge, the comical head bobbing starts in earnest, as they begin to take notice of the "outside" world and keenly focus in on their parents or anything else that moves for that matter! Then, as the ready meals to the scrape decrease ( deliberately ) the parent birds will encourage them to fledge and follow them into the element they were born to master - the air - where they will learn how to accept their food by means of a mid air "pass" Then they will learn how to kill and process live prey that is delivered to them, usually on the tower ledge. The Cam view will most probably be re-directed to allow viewing of this popular area, nearly always chosen by the juveniles as a hang out once they have left the nest.

So much yet to come and see - isn't it wonderfull !

Lesley Gerrard said...

Thank you so much Lorraine and Nick. Utterly fascinating!

Abby-Lynn said...

Thanks lorraine and Nick, that is very interesting. I think they will be sitting on the ledge very soon. Their wings are getting in the way of each other when are flapping them.

Lesley Gerrard said...

Parent just came in with something huge and went straight to little boy! Hurray!!

Abby-Lynn said...

I guess we should stop worrying about whether or not he gets fed, she is a good mom. I actually saw him try to take a smaller one away from her but she wouldn't let him. I guess he saw his sisters do it so he tried. Their wings are huge already.

Lindsay said...

OH MY WORD!!! I cannot believe the size of the chicks :-D I'm sure they have just grown in 1 day and shed some down!?

Beautiful to see, what a great job Mr & Mrs P have done. All their hard work paying off.

I almost don't want them to fledge! I'm just being selfish.

Peregrine Project Member (Nick M.) said...

We will try to redirect Stream 3 to show the tower view once the chicks have fledged. However there is an urgent IT need to replace the computer (running outdated Windows XP) which sends that video feed to the internet. Please bear with us if that Stream does not function for a while once the chicks have left the nest.

Heather said...

Many thanks Nick B, also Lorraine, for your very comprehensive explanation on my question about head bobbing, a real eye opener:)!
Am thinking of purchasing Ed Drewitt's book on urban peregrines in the hope it will stop me asking further questions. So much to learn about these magnificent birds. Pity about "the egg" but agree that it would probably have caused a riot,if not strike action, if it had been sent by post in such a smelly condition.

I think the little male is being rather canny in staying close to mum as she not only affords him protection from his larger siblings but she also gets the food from Mr P (if this is still the case or are they both feeding them now! - you see more questions!). He obviously gets enough footd for his size. Next we'll be worrying about him being pushed off the edge of the scrape, although they're wild birds there's always one we seem to empathise with more than the others.

Abby-Lynn said...

Mom just brought a huge prey and they are eating again. Yes, it will be hard to let them go again. He does feed them sometimes but eats a lot himself where as mom feeds them, eating little herself but possibly fills up when she takes off with the balance.

Abby-Lynn said...

I didn't see the prey brought in but I think the oldest female got it, had her fill then the second female had it. Mom came back and took it from her and the young female was playing tug of war with mom. Mom won of course and started feeding her and now is feeding the male. You can see the difference in the 2 females as one has lost much more of her down. But when the wings get flapping you see down flying all over. Fun to watch.

Abby-Lynn said...

Just looking at all three of them together close up I think the hatchings were female, male & female. He as lost more down that one of the females. So we shall see how they fledge.

Lesley Gerrard said...

The chicks seem to have grown faster than ever this year.
Now comes the heart-stopping time of chicks on ledge!!

Oak class said...

We are sad that the 4th chick didn't hatch and we are happy that the other 3 chicks are healthy and growing really well.
We are looking forward to when the chicks start to fledge. They have grown very quickly and we don't think it will be long now!

Abby-Lynn said...

Cam 4 is not coming in for me just now. All others are fine.

Lesley Gerrard said...

I have the sound from cam 4 but no vision

Abby-Lynn said...

Now mine is ok again.

Lesley Gerrard said...

And so is mine!!

Lorraine said...

A mere 24 hours and the chicks seem to have transformed yet again! Chest feathers now sporting the lovely distinct markings and all three taking on that sublime shape and appearance that defines the peregrine falcon which, wherever they go and whenever they're seen, will cause an intake of breath from all who sees them. ( a bit like what 'appens to Angelina Joley I guess! ) Anyway, our little trio are all looking very spruce indeed ( maybe it's Maybelene? )

Lorraine said...

Lovely sunset over the hoe in Plymouth tonight. Apparently, there's a storm brewing for many regions over the next day or so. If Derby is included I feel sure the chicks are now big enough to handle it. Bit concerned though for our local wild peregrine family, up on the exposed quarry rock face. This established pair suffered a flooded nest once before, which sadly caused the small chicks to drown. Mind you, this years two surviving chicks are roughly the same age as the Derby chicks, so they should be able to cope. Their Mum is a real warrior, not to be messed with, but after her recent trauma ( with her brave attempts to catch her falling chick ) she surely deserves a little kindness from nature.

All cozy and quiet in the Derby den just now.

Abby-Lynn said...

Dad just brought some prey and one of the females grabbed it and ran to a corner. Dad took off so hopefully the other 2 will get some.

Abby-Lynn said...

Well, the female worked on it for 12 minutes and turned her head for a moment and the male grabbed it so she walked away. so now he is working on the bit that is left. Hope mom comes in with some and feed the other 2. Very different chicks from last year.

Abby-Lynn said...

Mom just flew in and the little male ran to her and was squawking like crazy. She flew off and come back quickly with more prey and is feeding him. When he got the food away from one female before the other female took it from him so he didn't get much from it. But now mom is feeding him so all is well except the second female didn't get a lot of the other prey. They are so interesting to watch. Something new always going on. mom is filling him full right now.. He walked away so mom is feeding now. Now she is feeding one of the females.

Abby-Lynn said...

One of the female chicks was flapping her wings and got up on the edge of the scrape for about 2 minutes. Soon she will be on there all the time.

Heather said...

Lovely to see them all basking in the sunshine with MrsP affording them some protection and waiting for the "hunter/gatherer" to bring in some more prey. So one female chick has finally made it onto the edge of the scrape - "One small step for man (bird) etc..."!

Nick B (and anyone else interested in reasons for unhatched egg), excellect, if rather long article, just posted on Sheffield's website by Dr Nicola Hemmings, Dept. of Animal Plant Sciences at University of Sheffield explaining possible reasons for their 50% mortality rate this year (and yes they had a smelly egg too despite being placed in refrigerator for two weeks!) - Sheffieldperigrines.wordpress.com/

Lorraine said...

Thanks heather, will check out the link with interest.
Gosh, it seems the chick on view at the moment ( I think the oldest ) is a chick no more! Plumage now showing a remarkable change in appearance.

Lesley Gerrard said...

They seem to grow and mature every hour!
Well done mum and dad!!

Anonymous said...

What's happening to the cameras

Anonymous said...

its 1855 hrs on 11th June and I cant get a live feed on any of the cameras. Camera 4 is totally not working, what is the problem??

Heather said...

Camera 4 been playing up all morning, now nothing. Cam 1 stopped st 13.58. Cam2 stopped at 13.24. Nothing also on Cam 3.
Perhaps they've suddenly all become camera shy!

Kate said...

Morning all
Cam 4 working this morning, all three (I think) in far scrape.

Wildlife cams this year seem to be having trouble in several locations,I do so appreciate the dedication of those endeavouring to keep them running, and am sure they are all very frustrated.

Kate

Nick B (DWT) said...

We apologise for the camera problems this year in particular. Please bear with us and be aware that:
Only Nick Moyes is employed to sort them out (he's the only technically capable person to do so, having set the systems up and maintaained them since 2007, much of the work carried out as a volunteer).
He is currently paid using our lottery grant for just three hours a week. The money wouldn't stretch any further.
Nick has other employment three days a week and so can't be available at every minute to rush to Derby or contact the various service providers etc...so if things go down between Wednesday and Friday it will inevitably take longer for him to try to fix them.
Also this year, the city council, who kindly (and freely) enable the camera images to reach the companies who put them on the internet, are changing their systems and this is causing some temporary difficulties for us. They are doing what they can to help us, which we really appreciate.
On top of that, the cathedral is totally closed off Mondays to Fridays while major internal work is carried out (lasting all summer) so anything that needs doing up in the tower (eg re-booting the video servers etc) can't be done until the weekend. And part of the work is electrical, causing us further issues.
Rest assured that Nick is working as hard as he can to deal with these problems....and using extra voluntary time - eg at weekends.
This project runs with a very low financial input and as our lottery grant comes to an end, we are having to be seeking new sources of funding to keep it going.
Donations from web cam watchers like you have always been a major - indeed THE MAJOR element in our funding strategy. Your generosity in past years has been phenomenal and we will be coming to you again shortly with a big appeal for money to underpin the project and make it better next year.
The project team

ABby-Lynn said...

Just letting everyone know a juvie is on the ledge right now.

Thanks to all of you who maintain the cameras. We all appreciate all you do. I have tried all day to watch but when they are down I know there is a reason they can't be fixed immediately. We will bear with you guys. Good morning all and good night from me.

Anonymous said...

No cameras working at the moment so cannot coment on chick status,Looking at dates and times on camera data seems that cameras have been down for several hours again,As its been stated in previos bloggs that no access to building on weekdays will it be weekend before any action on camera fix!.

Anonymous said...

What a disappointment , I have watched since the eggs hatched and at the best moment , no cameras

Anonymous said...

Do what i did and go and watch Chichester, Cameras more reliable,(Carnyx Wild).

Abby-Lynn said...

We love our Derby Falcons and I think you are being unfair to our hard working men who take care of things. The cameras are inaccessible only because the building is being renovated & our VOLUNTEER who looks after the cameras can only be there on the weekend right now when the building can be accessed. We who truly love our Derby Falcons will wait patiently for the cameras to up and working again.

Peregrine Project Member (Nick M.) said...

I appreciate how frustrating webcam problems must be to everyone. I can only apologise and say that on Saturday morning when I'm allowed inside the cathedral I will be checking all our aerial connections and restarting our equipment. I can do none of this remotely at the moment (wheras this is normally possible) so I can only conclude it must be a really basic problem with our wireless connection in some way. Having had all our stream-hosting companies, and SERCO contact me to say they've tried everything at their end, it seems that this is the most likely cause.

Once again, I'm ever so sorry for such disappointment - it seems all the problems have come at once this year.

Thank for your patience

Nick M
Derby Cathedral Peregrine Project

Anonymous said...

I wasnt critisizing the hard working it/technicians!,Just trying to be helpfull just giving an alternative so as to not get bored.

Anonymous said...

Continued from last comment.,
Wish I was nearer as I to am a Technician and could possibly help in my spare time also as a volunteer.

Heather said...

Well said Abby and I concur with your comments.

No need for apologies Nick we fully understand the difficulties you are facing gaining access to the Cathedral this year due to maintenance, and were indeed fortunate to be able to have a window of opportunity to be able to have the chicks ringed this year. Fingers crossed that this weekend the camera glitches can be sorted out, perhaps a good old kick..........! :)

Abby-Lynn said...

Camera has stopped at 6:22 with one juvie on the ledge. I can't believe they will be gone soon.

Heather. said...

Camera 1 stalled at 9.56am and showing three rather wet and bedraggled juvies with one perched on the ledge. Weather looks like it's going to miserable for the rest of the day here in Bakewell but perhaps Derby might be a bit more fortunate for the Watchpoint - good luck (also with the cameras if there's a chance to try and fix them.

Linda said...

Nick you don't need to apologise to anyone, I totally agree as Heather and Abby have said, you do a brilliant job. Just one of those things. Sure it will be sorted asap. Negative comments are not conducive to anyone's enjoyment of our beautiful birds who incidentally look a bit bedraggled this am in the rain. I'm sure that any help 'Anonymous' who I am sure has previously stated has skills in this area could offer would be more helpful than leaving negative comments. But back to the chicks, the sky is looking a bit lighter hopefully the sun will be out later and they'll dry out. I cant believe how big they've grown. I was going down to the watch but it's throwing it down so presume its cancelled. Always look when I drive past. And Abby as you said, they are a very different bunch from last years chicks. But beautiful.

Rachel Prince said...

I'm so sad stream 4 is offline. It was the only stream I could watch. (Since I'm on a tablet.) I hope it gets resolved soon, I miss seeing the little fuzzies already. ♡

Kate said...

Thank you Nick's for all the work, we really do understand your frustrations,you have kept us updated and really appreciate how you care not only for our Peregrines, but your concern for us arm chair viewers is true dedication.Please take care as I am sure with all the building work ,things must be extra hairy. Bless you all.

Rachel:If you can see FLkr .I have posted the latest 13.00hours plus on Flikr, I had a shock when I saw only two in the end scrape , then joy of joy the other cam showed third one.
Kate

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Rachel: Nick M is in the tower right now trying hard to fix things....but whether the problems can be fixed by him or not remains to be seen. At the moment the answer seems to be no they can't!
Nick B

Lorraine said...

Don't worry, the Cams will be up and running eventually and compared to many other live feeds, we have a wonderful front row seat. Don't be disheartened as this is just a small hitch, presently beyond the teams control and due to unusual circumstances. Once the chicks leave the nest they will still be seen regularly, so stick with it, because there is so much yet to watch. The young fledglings will continue to visit the scrape and tower cam views for a long time after they become airborne so do keep tuning in, you won't be disappointed !

To this end, I've donated an extra dollop this year, to assist funding of the projects renowned team effort. Nothing makes them happier than to know we are happy, and they go to great lengths to ensure this. It's vital we support the volunteered skills that bring this wonderful experience into our homes. Consider the cost of a tasty weekend "take away" treat, then consider how a similar cost, donated, will "take away" your breath for many weeks to come! ............ and it won't repeat on you either !!








Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Thanks Lorraine for that kind comment. Nick M has been struggling up the tower for the last two hours on his knees trying to identify where the problem lies (he's just got home to a very late lunch at 3pm!).
It seems probable that the problem lies with a router which can only be changed by Serco, the company that manages the city council's IT. So the next problem is will the contractors working inside the cathedral next week allow anyone from Serco to access the tower to have a look when the cathedral is officially totally out of bounds all week?
We'll keep you posted.
Of course there are 100's of web cams on bird nests all over the globe that you can watch while the Derby cameras are playing up. Go to www.viewbirds.com to find links to lots of them - ospreys, other peregrines, black and also white storks and loads more.
Nick B

Lorraine said...

Can see the tiercel has brought in some lunch - he looks quite small compared to his little plump trio. Nice job Dad!

Helen said...

All three juveniles were looking fit and healthy during this morning's watch point despite the heavy rain! There was some vigorous wing flapping and plenty of preening taking place. One of the youngsters remained perched on the edge of the platform for some time giving us good views through the telescopes below. Both of the adult birds stayed on the hotel lettering for a while, until the male bird tucked himself away in a more sheltered spot on the cathedral tower! Some of the children and parents from Leys Junior school in Alfreton braved the weather to come and watch the birds after learning about them in class - hopefully it was a great experience for them to see the birds for real!

Anonymous said...

Without knowing anything about the router the only thing i can think of is that due to location of unit, Enviromental issues with the router, i/e condensation due to recent weather conditions, Hot and humid during the day and cold at night would have adverse effect on unit,. Switch it off for 30mins give it a good spray of WD40(I mean really soak it) Then Power it back up. What ever you do dont give it a good kick!.

Anonymous said...

This method has worked in the past for myself even when equipment has been submerged in water., Trust me I am a qualified technician.
Cheers, I hope this works if you try it.

Anonymous said...

After spraying with WD40 leave for 15mins or so before powering up.
Good luck again.
Hope this at least saves all a bit of money and brings the smile to the faces of others.

Nick B (DWT) said...

A recent comment from Sandee with a link has been deleted since it was certainly spam. If you see a link in any future comment we suggest you do NOT click on it unless it is clearly from a project member.
The project team

Sandee said...

Oh heavens no - no spam from me, I'm a big fan of the webcams! I've been watching since the chicks were hatched! I was sorry the cameras weren't working, but I saw this image broadcast from another source, and simply wanted to share a still photo. This link just goes to an upload site hosted by the iPhone app I used. It's safe - but I understand your concern.

Feel free to delete the link again, but I just wanted folks to know I'm not a spammer, just another fan of the Derby Falcon family! :( http://campl.us/c963toecGCi

PS: I have 980g of fish and stream my own webcams, again - my interest is in all animals (feathered, finned or with fur). http://www.sandeeland.com/fishcam

Heather said...

Many thanks Nick M for all your efforts to try and sort out the technical problems - hope you enjoyed your late lunch. Whatever you did there seems to be a small miracle inasmuch as Cam. 1 is working at present time. All fast asleep with falcon on watch.

Rachel Prince - if you want to view all cameras (when working!) using your iPad you download the Puffin app from the app store. Hope this is of some help!

Abby-Lynn said...

Moms sitting at one end of the scrape and one of the females is sitting on the other end.

jane Tagg said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Sandee: apologies for deleting your first email - more haste less speed on our part next time!
The screenshot is great and we'll use it on the blog if we may. Keep them coming!
Nick B (DWT)

jane Tagg said...

I shall try and leave my message on the blog this time instead of accidently removing it.

At lease with the cameras not working it is getting me used to not seeing them live on a daily basis which is what will happen when they properly fledge ! I shall miss them.