Saturday, 6 July 2013

End of another good season

The final Watch Point (6th July) was held in hot, sunny weather with plenty of volunteers helping and a steady flow of visitors. Among the many visitors was a young Chinese couple who were in Derby to find somewhere to live (he will be working for Rolls Royce and seemed very interested in getting involved), a South African who was enjoying the 'cool weather' here and we also had a visit from a relatively  new Derbyshire Wildlife Trust trustee - good to meet you Sarah L!
The excellent photo below shows a food pass taken recently by a good friend of the project, 'Whycliffe'.
A food pass - photo copyright  Whycliffe

The birds (apart from the male) showed off well, with plenty of flying about during the morning. The juveniles have adopted a second home on the top of the blocks of flats over the river, where a pair of grey wagtails was discovered nesting in the river bank by Andy M.
A Watch Point earlier in the year 
Under Ian Layton's supervision (and his great ability to drag people over from the far corners of The Green), the Watch Points this year have run very well with some 2000 attendees (that's a ball park figure for now).
A massive 'thank you' both to him and especially to our band of trusty volunteers, too many to name but you know who you are! These three hour sessions are quite demanding and tiring, with often no breaks and no sitting down either.
As readers of this blog will know, Ian has been busy encouraging groups of people who wouldn't otherwise have encountered our birds to come and see them. Scroll down the blog and you'll see the very varied range of groups we've had come along.
The new feather banners, funded by our
lottery grant, worked well
Another big 'thank you' is due both to all our online viewers (many not able to get to Watch Points of course) and those of you who have donated this year. We'll tot up these donations and post a total here in a week or two. If you would like to donate, scroll down to find how to do it.
For anyone living in the BBC East Midlands TV area, the programme 'Urban Jungle' which includes sequences showing the ringing of the chicks, will be shown sometime later this month. As soon as we have a transmission date we will post it here....the BBC has promised to let us know as soon as they know.
We must also thank the cathedral staff for their support and forbearance. John Armitage, the cathedral volunteer responsible for visits, has been particularly helpful and supportive - so he deserves a special mention, as do all the vergers who have helped us in many ways too.

With luck, the juveniles will gain more confidence day by day and gradually learn to hunt for themselves. As you know, the next six months of their young lives are fraught with danger. They must catch enough food to live on, avoid flying into buildings, wires and other obstacles and keep themselves away from humans too (not everyone likes peregrines!). Whether they will all survive we will probably never know.
Watch out for the BBC Urban Jungle programme,
coming to the East Midlands  region soon

51 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why don't you switch the camera's of during the closed season so to speak. In all fairness there is nothing really to see now for the best part of eight months or there about's. Apart from the odd view of a peregrine. Most of the other Peregrine projects seen to do this. I personally feel this would be a big money saver on your behalf, and then what you save could be used else where....ie better camera's. The blog doesn't seem to get updated very often anymore, and not many photo's from local photographers, its seems to of lost a lot of interest to me, and it always just seems to be begging for money all the time. I think things need to change a great deal.....not a dig just an opinion...thanks. regards Roger.

Sue Peregrino said...

Hi Roger
You are of course perfectly correct to say that the peak of excitement around the platform has finished now, but there will be occasional activity. Hard bitten addicts like me will check back from time to time, and I know I'm not alone. There'll definitely be competition amongst the core watchers come February time to see who sees and hears the first courtship activity happening on the platform - there's no way anyone would want to wait 8 months, that's way too late. Traffic will naturally diminish so it costs proprtionately far less in the "off" season to run the cameras and it would be a pity to deny the big fans a view, especially as they are people that probably have donated. I see keeping the cameras on as one of Derby's "USP"s in comparison to other projects. Speaking as one of the watchpoint volunteers (and from "out of county" at that) I can tell you that there are still amazing numbers of Derby residents who we have welcomed who know nothing of the project or the cameras. We've been telling them "you can see it on the web" - how would that look if they rush off and see a big black hole? I definitely couldn't survive without my "fix" of Derby webcam! I should say that my home project is Aylesbury and they have switched off (due to funding issues) and it's going to be very hard to try to inspire and excite people all of a sudden next year, the momentum is all lost. It's also disappointing to get a news blackout. I'm sure that Derby will have news to give us and will do so. For example, I'm on the edge of my seat waiting for confirmed news of possible sightings. Also, we've been told that "Urban Jungle" will be on the telly soon. I'd like to hear exactly when that will be and don't you think that people would think it odd to hear about webcams then go and see ........ a big black hole?
As to local photographers, I can promise you that there was at least one local photographer at yesterday's watchpoint (who made a very generous donation, thank you) but people aren't obliged to put their photos on the website. Maybe that's something the project could institute - an annual competition with a prize for the winner and entry fees going to the project fund (please note Project Team!) :)
Incidentally, I saw the yellow wagtail nest (thanks Andy) and it was exquisite. We also saw a buzzard soaring high above the cathedral, good thing it was far from the cathedral or it would have received a beating up from the falcons.

Sue Peregrino said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sue Peregrino said...

and PS, just to prove a point, I've just commented, not even looked at the cams! I enjoy the cameraderie of the blog community as much as anything. And incidentally, I'm just an ordinary watcher, I'm not Project Team so this is all unsolicited unofficial comment.

Anne said...

Well said Sue, I'm in full agreement with you. I still enjoy 'dipping' in and out to watch our peregrines and seeing what they are doing. So far I've not gone on line and not seen at least one of the birds. Please keep the cameras rolling as long as possible.

Many grateful thanks to all those involved in this project.

Anne of Allestree

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Roger: thanks for your comment which will get discussed internally.
I'd just make a few comments by way of a quick reply:
We have enough money to keep the cameras running all year - and we have done so since 2007. Donations do cover those costs and more. We probably don't need any new cameras for awhile...just need to lift the new camera out of the reach of the birds for next season.
Re. donations - the project has been generously supported by many hundreds of online viewers over the years. Everyone's enjoyment comes free and untrammelled by adverts (which we wouldn't be allowed to put on anyway since the web cams are hosted by the city council. People who don't want to donate needn't of course.
Re. Updating the blog: I think we have updated quite often (and put little updates on existing posts too). I'll count up the posts since January and compare the number to last year but I am sure we post much more often than other projects.
re. Camera attention: it is to be expected that photographers will move on to other sites and subjects after awhile. Remember that the project has been running for eight years now!

Nick B (DWT)

Lorraine said...

Hello all,
Though I completely understand the angle and logic of Roger's money saving idea re the camera's etc., I would still like to continue viewing the fledglings which often return to the cam sites. But even more....I NEED to view the fledglings that often return to the cam sites !!
I feel so sure that they'll continue to use these familiar locations for some time yet. Also, just one visit, from either of the birds, can reveal a lot of interesting info. Each day brings another new observation. Did you see the juvie last night that practically moulded itself into a favourite hollow on the ledge? At first glance, when I checked in, as I do every evening just before dusk, I didn't even spot it - until it moved! It chose to lie down and sculpt its body to fit a hollow in the ledge, head tucked well under wing, thus making itself fully secured for a deeper sleep than perhaps perching alone could accommodate. I'm in the process of sussing if this is either:
a) merely an individual preference of this particular bird,
b) a juvenile trait only ( a revert to nesting behaviour ) or,
c) something that all peregrines do to ensure security when needing a deeper period of sleep - though I haven't seen similar behaviour in either of the adults.
Maybe they do this in the wild and it's merely an instinctive act, perhaps to accommodate higher wind velocity in wilder rock-face locations etc., Also, by watching the cam views of the young returning birds, there are definite changes noticeable in their co-ordination and dexterity when tackling the prey that the adults continue to supply at these sites. I for one, would be anxious if I couldn't be visually assured by their well fed and healthy looking appearances, especially as their biggest hurdles are yet to be overcome in the coming weeks. So, whilst the parental bond and all it's associated activity around the nest box and feeding ledges are still a part of the family's daily routine, I intend to keep checking in for some time yet! We've been so fortunate with the Derby brood,( a lot of other locations have not been half as lucky ) and these four chicks seem well on track to becoming a notable exception to natures rule ( BBC already on their tails ! ) I'm also sure we'll see many more air-born images posted, and, if someone is really lucky, maybe even a shot of a first successful dive and capture. The BBC coverage has done much to highlight the 2013 Derby project and I have no doubt that funding and donations will ensure 2014's continued observations of the two adult peregrines that have captured the hearts and minds of so many viewers around the world. I do understand the costs involved, and appreciate Roger's comments, of course, but personally, I need time to follow and observe a while longer yet. Discovery of the Derby webcams, during a period of personal heartbreak and loss, enabled me a pathway to recovery, where nothing else could. The witnessed emergence of new life, and the meaning of nature itself, was an unexpected re-establishment of faith and joy that would not otherwise have entered my heart. I'll continue to monitor the cams until all four have learnt their trade, mastered their art and flown to fulfill a new cycle and a new beginning of their own. Nature sure is sweet... it hurts, it heals and then it enables, no matter what! So, whatever happens regarding a decision about the cams, If there is one to view, then I'll always be watching. As Sue mentioned, many more Derby residents, already proud of their Cathedral, have now become aware (thanks to the volunteers) of this most precious jewel in it's crown, and I'm sure a lot of them will now be checking in to give it an eyeball polish !

Nick B (DWT) said...

Lorraine: heartfelt thanks for your comment and the trouble you've taken over writing it.
Your assertion about how nature can heal and restore is one which I know to be echoed my quite a few other web cam watchers and it is really heartening for us to know that people are getting such deep renewal and pleasure from their contact with these special birds.
Thank you and do keep in touch.
Nick B (DWT)

Helen said...

From an educational point of view I think it's fantastic that the webcams run all year round as it means that teachers can use them at any time, whenever it fits in with their curriculum, and they don't need to wait until the breeding season. The birds are often visible in the winter months and so the webcams do give an insight in to their daily lives through all the different seasons. It's only because the webcams run all year round that we have learnt so much about these birds - the first video clip of night time hunting is just one example that springs to mind.

Anonymous said...

reading your recent comments as a local peregrine supporter and a photographer the Derbyshire wildlife trust do an excellent job on the project however the DWLT could take public opinion on board
peregrine falcon are breeding in most city and towns and they are wild birds lets hope we can all enjoy these birds were ever they chose to breed

Nick B (DWT) said...

Just totted up that we have written 34 posts for this blog since January and have received 885 comments. Not bad in my estimation!
Nick B (DWT)

Nick B (DWT) said...

And what's more there are three juveniles in the platform right now (9.26 pm).....
NB

Mo Cole said...
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Phoebe said...

I have been watching the food prep happening as I type - three juveniles in the scrape. Not sure if they are waiting for a share or checking that he is prepping correctly. I also seen the pud cam picture wobble which tells me there could be a bird sat on it! Great to see them staying around.

Anonymous said...

Whilst I understand that many people may be too busy to spend time watching hoping that a bird may appear, Some house bound people who are ill, disabled or elderly can find the site helpful in providing an interest and a source of contact with others. Part of the trusts remit for the project is to reach minority groups and I am aware there are a number of people use this site in this way. To restrict this for them would be such a shame. I also log in most days to see what is happening it is nice to spend 5 mins just chilling. The updates they provide for us are useful in keeping us all updated.
Chris M

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Sue Peregrino said...

Just logged on again to read the gossip from fellow peregrinos and I'm mortified to see I typed YELLOW wagtails. Sorry that should have been GREY of course. So sorry, brain and fingers typing do not always seem to communicate!

Nick B (DWT) said...

Hi Mo and Anon: re. your questions about peregrines at other sites in the county: we have decided not to make the location of such sites known on this blog since some of us believe that, unlike the cathedral site, they may not be 100% secure.
Peregrines elsewhere in the county and beyond suffer real persecution and we would not want to be responsible for publicising a site which then suffered from interference. We know that some sites are quite well known, especially locally but we also know that many people with less than positive views about peregrines read this blog and so I hope you understand why we have withdrawn your comments....we will reply to you Mo since we have your email address but if Anon would like a response, please repeat your question and send it to peregrines@derbyshirewt.co.uk .

Project team

2M Gorsefield Primary School Radcliffe Manchester said...

Dear Derby Peregrine Team
We loved watching the Peregrine Falcons at school. We have learnt a lot about Falcons and a very big thankyou to you all. Some of us have written on the blog comments at home and have loved getting replies from Nick! We love Peregrines now and we hope our babies will be alright. We will miss them very much as they swoop and fly through the air.

Sue Peregrino said...

I feel I must back Nick Brown up on the sad continuing need to be discreet about "wild" breeding peregrines. You only have to scroll a few posts back to one from Lorraine aabout what happened near Plymouth. I believe that the areas within DWLT that are referred to have a poor reputation for raptor persecution? Certainly, there was a nasty spate of horrible comment from nasty people on this very website a few years back. I was not snow white in the episode as I actually challenged a bad guy to a fight on cathedral green (thank God he never turned up!) Perhaps in time to come you folks who know the sites can organise 24 hour guarding duty - and security clear such guards? Until you can, I too believe it's irresponsible to release details to the public (much as I personally would LOVE to know) I believe I have more than proved my trustworthiness in "my" county (Bucks) but I know there is at least one "wild" site which those who know will not reveal even to me. As the saying goes "there is only one way to keep a secret .... NEVER tell". There is no way I can compromise the security of this site as I have no idea where it is.
This whole area is one of the the wonderful things about urban sites with webcams - the public can enjoy them while the birds have total protection. All more evidence in support of keeping webcams on perhaps (although one would like to hope that someone climbing up the cathedral tower might just be noticed!)

Sue Peregrino said...

Just after I submitted the previous comment it occurred to me that perhaps those with specialised knowledge should work with the Derbyshire Ornithological Society (website www.derbyshireos.org.uk ) This is the mechanism of how it works in Bucks - detailed knowledge is shared by senior officers of the Bucks Bird Club.

Nick B (DWT) said...

Dear 2M at Gorsefield Primary:
thank you so much for the interest you have shown in our peregrines and our project. It is great that, even though you are a long way from Derby, you have become so involved.
All four juveniles were flying very strongly on Saturday and we'll check them again this afternoon. So the omens are good.
Thanks also to your teacher who has enabled you to see and hear our birds (and the bells no doubt too!). We understand that she is retiring soon but that she has passed her enthusiasm for the peregrines on to other teachers so that children can keep watching and learning in years to come.
Gorsefield's support, interest an comments have been an inspiration to us. Do keep in touch!
From Nick and The Project team

Nick B (DWT) said...

Thanks for your comments Sue.
Raptors in Derbyshire are suffering for high levels of persecution, especially but not only on the moors.
So secrecy is paramount when it comes to knowing where these birds are breeding.
In addition to the DOS (who are very discreet) there is a specialist raptor group in the county who do a lot of excellentnest monitoring work.
Nick B

Lorraine said...

Three birds back at cam sights around dusk last night to mull over the days lessons. Two in the nest box ( one guarding his supper with his wings and the other on the lip waiting for a chance to get a beak-full, with a third ( could have been a parent )on the ledge under the scrape. Two back again around the midnight hour one of which tucked up for the night on lip of scrape and the other settled into his little hollow on tower ledge for the night( had to laugh because by looking at the flickr pics it seems the hollow I've been referring to is actually the "cheeks " of the downward facing gargoyles bottom! ) One sat on tower ledge surveying the scene a short while ago when I checked in,( think it was a male ) but now gone back to classroom in the sky when school bell rang. Take care and be lucky little fellow ! Will see them later when they check in at dusk. Didn't get chance to go to the woods over weekend ( had to sort the garden out ) but weather here in Plymouth set to stay all week so aim to go along and gather some info about " Lazarus " from the vigilant watchers and hopefully report back some good news later in week. Will take care from now on about precise locations etc.,
BFN good buddies from Lorraine.

Anonymous said...

Just HAD to thank Whycliffe for the latest pics on Flckr - they are wonderful - and it's sooooooo good to see the juvies in the air and obviously doing just dandy. Two now presently settled back in around cam points as usual - bellies full I have no doubt.

Sue Peregrino said...

Wow! I second that comment about the stunning image posted onto the blog header from Whycliffe. I don't use Flikr due to lack of time and skills but I can see that I'm going to have to rectify this. I know that I'm not alone in struggling with some of the technology and would willingly pay to be taught. Is this something else that the project could consider running?
I've also been meaning to empathise with Lorraine and her feelings of nature being a beacon of light and hope in times of trouble. Big thanks to Derby for helping us to remember what a beautiful world it is despite troubles that sometimes come. It helps us through the dark times.

Lorraine said...

Well, what a lovely day I've had today!
I visited my home project here in Plymouth and watched two juvies flying, chasing pigeons and generally just larking about all around me! I also viewed them up close and personal through the big powerful telescopes, and it was juuuust smashin!
One of the volunteers was able to give me some info about the "Lazarus" incident. From what I could gather, this was actually an event of a previous year, when sadly neither the chick in question, or any siblings, managed to pull through and survive the relentless weather conditions up on the rock face. They apparently also had a year when the whole brood actually drowned in the nest before they could even fledge. How awful.
But, this year's two very fit and healthy looking juvies,( a male and a female ) both effortlessly partaking in activity with the parent birds, made it all the more special locally and lovely to see in person.
I must say, the 6 mile hike through the woodland and the resultant muscle aches have taught me a lesson. I feel motivated now, to do a few laps, every day, around my local park, starting tomorrow!
Well, a cup of cocoa later (cos I've earned it after all) then another quick look-in at the Derby cams (no visitors at present) and then it's an earlier turn-in than usual for me, on account of quite a few aching bones! As our peregrine pals would say "The only way - is up!" and I've certainly had a real high flyer of a day today! Nite all zzzzzzz

Hilary B'ham said...

Two Juvies having a feed in the nest site at 8.05a.m. Wonder who caught it? Lovely to see them thriving.> Roger - I log on just about every day of the year and regularly see activity on the scrape. I think Derby's blog is the absolute best of the many U.K. ans several U.S.A sites I follow. "Begging for money"....I don't think so. You don't have to donate a single penny if you don't want to and you don't have to log on.Do you have any idea how much time and effort (voluntary and unpaid)have gone into this project? I think it's amazing.

Helen said...

Three juveniles visible on the cameras this evening, with one of the adult birds sitting on the stonework below the platform.

Sue Peregrino said...

I actually feel a bit sorry for Roger now! He did say he wasn't having a dig and was just trying to be helpful ..... but we've let him have it with both barrels. I guess he's got the message loud and clear that there are quite a few of us in the "leave the cams on" camp!!!! Glad you had a good visit to your home site Lorraine. Peregrines are massively tough birds but there have been some terrible conditions for them of late. In 2012, many of us watched in horror as 3 of the 4 Nottingham chicks perished in the big storm that brought in the dreaful summer. At a secret "wild" site in Bucks, the nest, contents and the sitting female all perished. 2013 has been tough with the late cold spring but thank God it's been generally kinder to the peregrines it seems. Unfortunately, it wasn't kind at Aylesbury where we only had a clutch size of 1 instead of the normal 4. Derby did incredibly well to fledge 4 although, as Nick pointed out earlier, being a juvenile peregrine is no bed of roses either.

Lorraine said...

Just a quickie, if anyone is watching the cams just now - Is that the adult male I see on the ledge of the nest box? I haven't seen him for ages. His mustache is very dark, so perhaps it is indeed him. I do hope so. There's also a juvie on the tower ledge, head under wing, who may well take off again after a nap.

Lorraine said...

No - I realize now it isn't him after all. It's another juvie hoping for a dusk food delivery. May catch sight of one of the adults in that case.

Phoebe said...

There is a juvie in the scrape with prey that it has been plucking. Another juvie on the top. They look very hot and are trying too cool down.

lorraine said...

Glad to see we're still getting regular visits to the cam sites. Three back at the cookhouse door yesterday with two regulars continuing to spend the night on tower ledge as usual. It would be great to catch sight of the fab four all together for one last time wouldn't it, but perhaps the oldest is more independent now, with a pad of his own close by and a No.1 single coming out soon! Have any Derby residents managed to account for all four of them? I would be really interested to know, so please, do submit any such confirmation to the blog won't you. Met quite a few of my own family members over the weekend, when a load of the cousins got together ( one coming over from Spain even ) for a happy reunion, and a very good time was had by all. Most of us hail from Lancashire and so there was plenty of teasing and laughing going on! All were very interested to hear about the Derby web cams and I'm sure some will be tuning in at some point.
PS: There is a pigeon in the scrape and a juvie on the ledge at this moment - must watch to see if the two spot each other !

Lorraine said...

Nope - pigeon flew off ( glad he got away really ! ) Laters............

christine said...

Hi Lorraine just 2 let u no all four juveniles are ok! Saw them this aftanoon round and about the cathedral! From Christine

Lorraine said...

Oh Christine, thanks so much for that news ! I'm so chuffed, I've put an extra Jersey Royal in the pot for my tea!

Phoebe said...

I think it is fascinating the way the juvies stay so close for so long here at Derby. There are two in view right now on the cams.

Lorraine said...

Me too Phoebe. There is no doubting the extraordinary good fortune of the Derby juvies and the way they have all remained regular visitors around the scrape. I know I'm often guilty of bestowing human like behaviour on them, but do you remember that heart melting video of the adult male returning to the scrape with food for the chicks when they were still just balls of fluff? Instead of leaving the food for the mother to feed to them, he remained and began to do this task himself. But what astonished me, was the way he then so tenderly began to feed his mate! I don't care what anyone says, there was an unquestionable bond expressed between them both in those few moments. I reckon their years of experience together, combined with the ready supply of food, day or night, has given the adult falcons more spare time than perhaps would be the case in a more wild location. Given this " spare " time, perhaps their DNA has adapted to the conditions of their lifestyle and enabled a closer bonding than usual. I believe the Derby chicks have benefited by this and as a result they continue to seemingly enjoy touching base back in the scrape and on the tower ledge, knowing it to be secure and safe with food almost assured. I doubt the parents will begin the inevitable process of chasing them off for some time yet. And when they do, it will merely signify that they are assured that all four juvies have successfully managed to feed themselves unaided. A parent bird in a wild location would not have liberty of such long term tolerance of their fledged chicks and so mortality rates would, I think, be much higher. Only time will tell, but for now, the future of the Derby four continues to be blessed and they will carry the DNA of their parents attentive nurture to their own prospective mates and family units.
None home at present, but bet your bottom dollar one or two will show before midnight !

Lorraine said...

Sorry folks, but couldn't help it....

The Derby four are ever more
A source of jubilation,
Around the World they're known to be
A cause of speculation.
They come and go amid the Cam's
Where homely elevation,
Gives many grounded heart's below
Continued celebration.

I'm afraid it just comes in and I have to let it out !!

Lorraine said...

None showed last night - but one juvie been on tower ledge for some time eating on and off what I think was a small bird he'd either caught himself or had received in a pass. I think he's there for the night.

Phoebe said...

I do love your poems Lorraine, I wish I was as good with words. I see there is a new blog post thanking everyone.

Lorraine said...

Ta Phoebe re poem ! - Though my own limits are slip-off-the-tongue rhyme style, I deeply admire the real art of poetic wordplay, that is so brilliantly expressed within Caroline Hawkridge's poem, here on the site, entitled " Peregrine " If anyone hasn't already found it, please do, as it will knock your socks off! You will find more tingles and meaning with every reading. She has such incredible insight.

The new blog post served very well in expressing the sincere thanks, felt by so many of us, for giving us the whole fabulous experience. All due to the selfless effort of so many working behind the scenes. We know who you are ! - and you each deserve our utmost gratitude.

One of the lads spent the night on the ledge last night, with on and off visits today. I can hardly wait to hear further news of the orange ringed Yorkshire Peregrine by the way - now wouldn't that be just wonderful! .............

steph said...

Hi Lorraine,
I just want to say how much I enjoy reading your posts which keep us all up to date with the wonderful Peregrines of Derby - also enjoy your poetry. In your last post, you mention Caroline who also has written a poem, but I have been unable to find it. Would you be kind enough to repost it please ? Many thanks.
Steph.

Anonymous said...

I was at the cathedral today and plenty of activity going off, saw 2 peregrines, 1 with food, managed to get a few pics and a video.

Lorraine said...

Hello steph,
I'm glad my posts may be helpful to those who have less time to check in to the cams and also chuffed that my odd poem may add a bit of fun in between news from the cam views.

The simplest route to Caroline's 'Peregrine' poem is :-

From the Derby Webcam page, click onto the underlined 'Derby Peregrine blog' choice above the cam view choices -

Then, in the very top left hand corner of that page, above the silhouetted cathedral image, you'll find a small B (blog) search bar -

Merely tap in 'Caroline Hawkridge' and click search and this will take you directly to a dialogue of her background, followed by her poem.

It's quite sophisticated and very dimensional and you may have to read it over more than once, but I think every reader will find it hits the spot in a different place at every reading !

Juvies still regularly visiting the cam sights to eat and sleep, but yet to tune in and catch a view of who is actually bringing in the catch ( juvie or parent )

Just now read the latest post from anonymous in Derby, who's seen the juvies in person today from another angle near the Cathedral and has taken some pics and a video. So I'm off to search U tube in case it's been added there. The video may shed more light on weather or not the food brought in to the cam sights is via a juvie catch or a parent pass.

BFN
Lorraine

Anonymous said...

Hi Lorraine,
Anonymous from Derby here! The video I got is a bit wobbly! I was sat outside the Cathedral and one of the birds spent ten minutes or so circling round being very noisy! And the other I saw came from over the top of the European Inn restaurant carrying something or other but then changed direction toward Sadler Gate, I didn't see that one again, 20 mins later I was walking toward London Rd past the Westfield and saw one of them surrounded by gulls!

steph said...

Many thanks Lorraine! I've found Caroline's poem and understand what you mean about needing to go back to it several times. It's very unusual and the timbre reminds me a little of Haiku - where much is left un-said by using fewer words, thereby concentrating the mind.
Regards,
Steph

Lorraine said...

Hi anonymous,

It must be a GREAT feeling to see these (particular) birds in person, you lucky Derb-( onian? ) - as they are so noted for their good fortune and becoming ever more intriguing. Even an off chance sighting from someone like yourself, can bring substantial clue's to restricted webcam viewers. They're all obviously in good health and not going short of food, but I guess we wont discover quite yet, if the one you spotted above the Inn, for instance, was indeed carrying something that had been self caught, or received. It may have changed direction and been the same one you later saw surrounded by the gulls. If the gulls are persistently bothering them(at their peril you would have thought) then it would make a bit more sense as to why they continue to re-visit the cam sights. I mean, have you ever seen a gull trying to pinch food from the scrape! Mayhap, it is, quite literally, the very Cathedral itself that is the main equation in the mystery of the Derby juves continued bond with it? And all the time I thought they were coming back just for me !! Still, that doesn't account for why they often choose to spend the night there - now that IS done just for me, cos they know I'm still watching!

Soooo, if it's the great Cathedral itself that is responsible for their 4 out of 4 success, then perhaps there is a mightier pair of eyes than mine watching. It's his house after all!

Ow gawd, I feel a poem comin on ! - but for now that's enough !!!!!!! for one post...........

Lorraine said...

PS - Steph, I just googled Haiku and I see what you mean. I like it- a lot. But being originally from Corrie-land, we find it hard to say just one word, when 10 will just tumble out instead. I blame Bet Lynch and Ena Sharples for this!
Visitors on cams this afters and two present just now.
BFN

Anonymous said...

Hi Lorraine,
Anonymous again! this is the second time in a month I've experienced them, I was biking home from work along Stuart St near the new ish flats and heard screeching above and then all of a sudden one of the birds took a pigeon out of the sky, was amazing to witness, I left a comment on the Facebook Peregrine page at the time, as for yesterday a few people stopped to look as one of them was so noisy, I could hear it from outside the Standing Order!