Thursday, 13 May 2010

Watch Points begin this weekend




Fluffballs full-up


WatchPoints
You'll be pleased to know that we've been planning our summer Watch Points on the Green behind the Cathedral.
These will give visitors to Derby the chance to see our birds close up through telescopes which we provide. There is no charge but donations are always welcome, of course.
Watch Points have so far been arranged for every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from this Saturday (15th May) until at least mid-June and probably later, depending on how the chicks fare and exactly when they fledge.
Watch Points start about 10.30 a.m. and end at 1.30 p.m. when the sun moves off the east face of the tower.and starts getting in our eyes! If the weather is very wet on any one morning, then our volunteers may decide not to set up at all. They have no shelter there - so please bear with them.

We hope to see many of you over the next few weeks - do make yourselves known to our volunteers who will be only too keen to provide information about the birds and the project itself.


Other Things to Do in Cathedral Quarter
After watching the birds, why not drop into the Cathedral Centre on Irongate for a warming drink and food and perhaps also visit either or both The Silk Mill Museum by the river or the City's main Museum & Art Gallery on The Strand. You can purchase a DVD about the project from either venue (and sometimes also from the Watch Point).
The Watch Points are organised and run by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust and its volunteers.

The Project Team

PS Check out the Big Screen in Derby's Market Place from now onwards - our falcons will be live there every weekday from 1.15-1.45pm. and 3:15 to 3:45pm. More times will be added later we're told.
The live webcam in Derby Museum & Art Gallery is currently out of order whilst we await a replacement monitor, but the webcams are often available to watch on request at the reception desk of The Silk Mill.

Report on the first Watch Point - Saturday, 15th May:
The watchpoint went well today and the weather remained dry.
We were busy to begin with and had visitors from the local area, Leicester, Northampton and from Italy!
During the first one and a half hours the male was present- mostly perched on one of the gargoyles and seen eating prey. The female stayed on the nest platform for a lot of the time and had a couple short flights but kept the chicks in her sight.The heads of some of the chicks were visible on occasions. The tiercel left at about noon and didn't return before we closed. After the male left, there was less activity and there were few sightings of the chicks or the female who lay low on the platform.She appeared to be slightly disturbed by the people on the tower tour and made an appearance soon after 1 pm, circling the tower before settling back on the platform.
Celia & Helen.

153 comments:

Terry, Herts UK said...

Much as I hate to say it, it looks to me like Mrs P is serving sibling for lunch right now.

Certainly, something small, white/grey and fluffy.

Dave Hall said...

Just seen the same feed and my initial thoughts on the identity of lunch were the same as Terry's, but watched for a while and became convinced that the prey was at least as big as the chicks are now, so it was unlikely to be the dead chick.

The others did seem to get a good meal. All were initially trying to get food, but lost interest after a few beakfulls so they can't be desparately hungry. Also saw them having a wander round after the meal - all seemed to have very full bellies.

Not sure if it was the camera angle, but one of the chicks seemed to be a bit smaller that the other two. It didn't get left out of the meal though.

Mum took away the remains of the prey at the end of the meal. I interpret this as a good sign that they aren't short of food as I'd be surprised if (being an experienced parent) she took food away if the chicks were still hungry.

John B (not the sloop) said...

It happens Terry. Protein is protein when there are hungry mouths to feed and "waste not want not" is very much part of the raptor way of making a living.

At least with Peregrines we aren't treated to the disconcerting spectacle of bigger siblings using smaller ones as a "help yourself buffet" if times get hard.

Midge said...

Suspect the dead chick was the assisted hatchling - weak from the word go. I noticed that one chick was not feeding as eagerly as the others from the start.

Waste not, want not Terry. Can't have been much of a meal though!

Gio said...

At times it's their way.. We haven't to be sorry, they don't waste anything and a tiny dead body doesn't mean a child anymore to them.

I remember I saw Mariah&Kaver of Rochester, NY do the same in 2006 with two little ones who starved.

AnnieF. said...

They all seem mighty hungry! The tiercel has got off the chicks he was vainly trying to shelter ( they were wriggling about too much) and has hopped onto the scrape ledge, looking up and around very anxiously.

AnnieF. said...

Just as I wrote that, grub arrived! All 3 chicks lined up for food, looking well.

AnnieF. said...

it wasn't a large meal (just a small bird) but it seems to have soothed the pangs of hunger for a while.

KerrySuffolk said...

AnnieF, you were lucky to see the feed, that was the moment my computer decided that it was going to freeze and I missed it all!

I haven't managed to catch much activity lately, apart from the dead chick being fed to the others. :-(

On the other hand it is nice to see they have grown enough to no longer be completely hidden under the parents.

KerrySuffolk said...

PS. Looking at the web cam - Derby looks even colder than Suffolk at present! Hope summer comes soon.

AnnieF. said...

@ KerrySuffolk: Yes, it was sheer chance I was around to see the feed! Weather forecast: generally warmer weekend all round (hope it's right!).

AnnieF. said...

Another snack - it looks like the remains from the last meal.

Anonymous said...

i have notived that one of the remaining 3 chicks did not get any of the last meal at 17 20 tonight
seems very weak to me didnt even relise mum was there at first just lay there getting squashed by its siblings shame to say but i think this one looks ill.
any one elses opinion on that last feed ?????

Midge said...

Yes anaonymous. It was a bit woozy last night too. During the day it's been fine - could be it wasn't that hungry. The biggest gape gets the most food and it could have just been stuffed from the last feed and just not that interested. I sincerely hope so. These guys have been so successful so far I couldn't bear them to lose a clutch and desert Derby. This year was the first time they have lost a chick - fingers crossed for the other three.

AnnieF. said...

@ Anonymous and Midge: I'm afraid there was a chick I noticed, too, that didn't look right - it was missed out of two feeds this afternoon. It seemed always to be at the back, and ignored. I wondered whether the adult instinctively knew it wasn't going to be worth giving it food.

Phoebe said...

I've been away from my pc all afternoon does anyone have some screenshots from the afternoon feed please?

Pax (Canada) said...

7.30am, chicks on their own at the moment.Mum is back, but I dont see food so maybe she has already fed them and had gone to stash the left overs.

Helen said...

Some lovely images of the chicks feeding this morning. Won't be long now before they are moving around to the other side of the nest platform. Their feet look huge!!

Phoebe said...

07:09 - Breakfast was served by the falcon. It was the longest feed I have seen, lasting 20 minutes, needless to say they all had a belly full the little one especially. They were all very attentive and alert. Looking very fit and healthy this morning I am happy to say.

Julie said...

They are making me laugh this morning! Obviously they are far more mobile now and Mum just cannot gather them in as she would like. Everytime she moves to get one escapee under her wing another one pops out the other side. I never thought it was possible for Peregrines to look so exasperated!!! Good to see the 3 youngsters doing so well though.

Phoebe said...

The first chick has gone walkabout on the other side of the scrape! Mum went after it but decied to leave it to explore. It is still there now.

Ruthie said...

10.46 Two chicks being fed. Third one has wandered off to other side of scrape, not seen it fed yet.

Anonymous said...

I had a quick look in at 10.43 today, two of the chicks are being fed however the third chick, it looks smaller than the other two, is alone on the other side of the ledge. I hope it gets some food!

Joy said...

10.45 am watching a feed but only two chicks does anyone know anything about the third. My husband says there were three first thing this morning. Getting worried

Joy said...

No need to worry seen it at the other side of the scrape yet he doesn't look as big as the others. I feel happier now 10.50

Julie said...

10.45 and another feed by the falcon - but No 3 chick has now escaped to the other side of the scrape and is far more interested in exploring than eating!! Other 2 are getting their fill though ....

Julie said...

...... and now the falcon has gone across to the other side to feed No 3 as well - what a good Mum!

Nikki said...

Stretton Handley Primary School Y4

We've been watching the chicks being feed this morning and were sad to only see two. We hope they both survive.

Anonymous said...

Phew Thats a relief after my previous comment, Mum has gone over to the other side of the ledge with the prey and is currently feeding the third chick.

Craig said...

Sorry for the spamming of Flickr, I couldn't resist telling a little story of the little explorer.

Joy said...

Fascinating watching. Another little chick has gone the other side and then adult flew that side too. Now adult is back with one little chick and the other two are still on the far side of the scrape.

Is there anyway we could have a camera on that side as well or instead of the higher one? It's just a thought.

The other one is trying to get away from adult but it keeps bringing it back.

Oh dear I'm not going to get much done

Now adult has followed little one and brought it back. Its as though its been chastised for wandering off or should I say trying to.

Phoebe said...

Elevenses was served to the two bigger chicks, the smaller one was still on walkabout. After the others were fed she briefly took some food across to the little one who seems quite happy to stay on that side. They are so orderly and wait their turn for food. It looks like food has been left on the rhs and now there are two chicks there. Mum is keepin a watchful eye on them. Curiosity has got the better of the last chick who has made a dash for the other side, mum chasing after him - this is so comical. It would make a good video.

Joy said...

Of the two on the other side of the scrape one appears to be more alert and its as tho its trying to look after its younger sibling. Mum is being attentive, keeps watching them and obviously something else is bothering her.

Craig said...

11:34 I was beginning to think that the scrape had moved to the other side of the nest, where the kids were snoozing but Mum went over and woke them up telling them to get over to the right side.

Helen said...

No chance of getting any work done in school this morning with those chicks wandering around playing "hide and seek" and "follow the leader"!!

Craig said...

12:17 Thanks for setting the camera to the other side of the nest. Now all we need is a third camera page to see multi.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Hold on Craig - I'll just schedule in a nervous breakdown in my diary!

Joy said...

Thanks to the team for putting the camera on the other side of the scrape. I do appreciate it and am sure others will too.

Craig said...

"Hold on Craig - I'll just schedule in a nervous breakdown in my diary!"

Not time for nervous breakdowns chicks are wondering around.

:)

AnnieF. said...

That little chick must be getting very cold. It has barely moved for a long time.

AnnieF. said...

Does anyone know for certain what's going on? The adult which was sitting on the lhs went across to the chick on the rhs and sat over it. But then I saw only one chick left on the lhs, and I'd expected two! Where's the third?

Phoebe said...

Poor Mum she just went across the other side to brood the wandring pair for a few moments then back to the other one, she is being run ragged - where is dad when she needs him.

AnnieF. said...

The adult went back to the chick on the lhs, while the one on the rhs has changed position slightly - but that could have been as a result of the adult's feet.
It's all a bit worrying.

Pam said...

Project Member ... I think your nervous breakdown may have to wait until after Mrs P has her own one!

AnnieF. said...

Panic over - I've just realised that there are 2 chicks on the rhs, huddled together!

Demelza said...

I missed something.. Is the 3rd chick now on the other side?

Pam said...

Seems like Dad gave them a good talking to. They are all on their best behaviour for their 3 o'clock feed and their manners are impeccable.

Ruth said...

Great shots of feeding time from the RH camera - 3 chicks all looking attentive and getting a fair share of the prey.

Craig said...

15:03 Chicks are having a nice lunch and the camera angle on the to the right hand side of the nest is a good one.

Chicks are for once not climbing over eachother, sitting nicely around mum. Looks like a little school for Peregrine - bet she's teaching them how to pluck and eat pigeon.

Stretton Handley Primary School said...

What a relief! We now realise that one of the chicks had wandered over to the other side and all three are OK.

Stretton Handley Primary School

Pam said...

Could the difference in size just be that 2 are female and the little one is a male?

MEL said...

I don't think they've been as active as this at so young an age since we first started watching them in 2006. They certainly never used to wander to the other side of the ledge, they always seemed to be under someone's wing the majority of the time most years. I certainly wondered what was happening when they weren't in the left-hand side earlier this morning.

freda said...

Iam worried about the three remaining chicks,They look very still at the moment.

Phoebe said...

I don't think there is need to worry they do go sleepy after meals and sleep helps them to grow. they will soon be more active when they have grown a bit more.

AnnieF. said...

Tea-time and all's well, a very orderly trio in front of Mum.

Anonymous said...

something dosent look quite right,chick on the left hasnt moved at all for quite a while,hope im wrong

Midge said...

Today has been a treat! Our chicks are now at the 'terrible twos'. One leaves home, then another follows and in the end the whole family has to move house. Little monkeys. Poor Mum tried her best to corral them but had to admit deafeat. What are we going to do once they fledge?????

Midge said...

You are over worried annoymous. I have been watching all day and the three chicks are fine. WHY are you anonymous. We're a very friendly lot.

Those of you who are as crackpot as me might like to check out a fabulous site I have found with a Little Owl sitting - due to hatch towards the end of this month. When our Peregrines begin to roost the Little Owls come to life. Not savvy enough to provide a link but the site is Steenvil-Beleef ole Lente 2010. Never thought I would see a Little Owl looking contented but this Mumsy so does. Watched her sitting motionless until a moth made the mistake of coming within range and then whoof, catch, chomp, yum.

This is what I call bird watching!! Good job I'm the boss.......

Terry, Herts UK said...

Thanks Midge

Little Owl webcam link

Best in full screen.

Ruth said...

On that same site (Dutch equivalent of RSPB), there are webcams in a variety of nestboxes, including (on tabs from left to right) Little Owl, Kestrel, Eagle Owl, Great Tit, Stork, Swallow, Barn Owl and Nuthatch. Well worth a visit, but addictive too :-)

Ruth said...

At a second glance, however, the webcam labelled "Torenvalk" ("Kestrel") appears to be occupied by - a Collared Dove.

freda said...

this is Freda (anonymous) Iam looking every day i watched all last year as well,i have a Osprey site at Rutland Water Osprey Web Cam

Mary T said...

looks like the chicks are all a bit lively in the morning sunshine!

Mary T, Belper

chrisx said...

Hi All - I have been moonlighting watching hummingbirds in California - the other end of the size scale :-) Try this in the afternoon -therare serveral hours behind us - http://www.ustream.tv/hummingbirdnestcam

KerrySuffolk said...

10:22
Mum still trying to control wayward chicks! At the moment she hae developed a resigned look and given up for a bit.

KerrySuffolk said...

10:29
One chick now penned in corner on rhs of nest platform!

KerrySuffolk said...

10:33
Mum has given up and gone to stretch wings.

KerrySuffolk said...

10:33
Back with morning snack.
Watching this is not helping my allotment get dug!!!!!!!!!

KerrySuffolk said...

10:35
All very well behaved and obeying orders now mum has brought a snack. Is this the human equivalent of giving the kids sweets to keep them quiet?!!!!

Anonymous said...

Two of the chicks look fine, if a little floppy at the moment, and are moving around away from the falcon. But the one she’s covering seems very still and at around 11.20-11.25 a.m. she got up and had a very close inspection – seemed to be nudging it. Didn’t look great to be honest.
RJ

Karen Anne said...

Three chicks moving, for those of us with paranoia. Maybe the parental unit is Dad? Because they are pretty big compared to whoever it is.

AnnieF. said...

What a marvellous website! Thanks Midge, Terry & Ruth.

Just seen two very careless pigeons on the corbels below the scrape .. The peregrine family seems quite relaxed today.

Phoebe said...

The falcon left the scrape a few moments ago then came back with no food, she must have had a wing stretch, she is sitting on the ledge now looking up and around at something, possibly the tiercel is either flying about with food or plucking prey on the tower.

AnnieF. said...

The tiercel's been for a quick flight & is now on the nestbox ledge rhs looking around anxiously as if waiting for a delivery of food. The chicks look comfortable & seem to have grown enormously.

Phoebe said...

Just realised there is possibly and tower tour happening and that is what the falcon is watching and listeneing to.

Joy said...

Thanks Chrisx for hummingbird website, its brilliant and from that you can get one of storks.

I do wish our website of the peregrins was like the Hummingbirds everything as it happens without delay but I believe its all down to cost.

Mr & Mrs P you are still doing well, didn't notice them use that side of the scrape last year, well not until the chicks were much bigger.

Phoebe said...

It's the tiercel I think that just landed on the scrape ledge then flew down and was hopping along the corbels below the RHS of the scrape.

When was the last feed? I have not been able to watch for a few hours.

Pax(Canada) said...

Another falcon hatching right now
http://www.greatriverenergy.com/aboutus/environmental/birdcam.html

Anonymous said...

My hand is up on the paranoia front – apologies for my earlier post.

They are being left alone quite a bit at the moment. The warmer weather and their size I guess.
RJ

AnnieF. said...

Tea-time!

Karen Anne said...

Dinner time. I was worried about the one in the back not being fed, but he seems to have jostled himself up to the front and is getting fed now.

Phoebe said...

Supper is served!

Anonymous said...

21.13 A long feed just ended but one of the chicks didn't seem to do too well, being at the back and left out quite a bit.

Craig said...

Has a date and time been set for the ringing of feet?

Anonymous said...

Very strange behaviour from the falcon from about 11.46 onwards. She was perched on the ledge, and then went back to the smaller of the three and it appeared she spent the next 10 or so minutes ‘play fighting’? With the screen only refreshing every 4 or 5 seconds or so, difficult to see, but it looked most odd. still going on at 12.00
RJ

Phoebe said...

I don't know what was going on with the smallest chick it appeared to be on it's bask with legs in the air while mum was tending to it. Pic posted on Flickr. I am getting concerned now although I was trying not to worry. the chick still appears to be on its back! Mum is constantly with it.

Phoebe said...

Bearing in mind what was said in the original post about contagious disease, none of us like to see sick birds of any kind. I think a lot of people wonder if the parents actually grieve or miss lost chicks. We don't actually know if they do but being human with feelings and emotions it is difficult to detatch from them. Looking at the Falcon now and how she is tending to the smallest chick it does appear that she is aware of its health or sickness. It looks like she is trying very hard to help her chick. If we were to lose all of the chicks is it possible that they would try again this year or wait until next year?

Midge said...

Don't like what I've just seen! The smaller chick on its back. Mum went in to help and it looks as though it is the right way up again but it was in a strange position at the last feed also - feet splayed out in odd directions and showing no interest in food.

Anyone else disturbed by what they saw?

Phoebe said...

After watching most of the Lunchtime feed Little One seemed to be getting a share and was sat up with the other two. Maybe my first instincts were wrong - I hope so. He could just need a bit more attention at the moment.

mark murfin said...

hope that chicks ok been very still for a while

Julie said...

I too was watching all the "going ons" earlier with Mum and the chick. That chick had, just beforehand [~11.30], been peering over the edge of the scrape and looked well and alert to me. It then moved over towards Mum - who almost seemed to be attacking it. As someone said it is hard to see what is happening with the screen refreshes. I did think at one point she had killed it, or at best injured its leg, but I saw it later and it seemed ok. Haven't a clue what it was all about but guess we have to trust Mum's instincts.

Midge said...

Feel a bit more optimistic after this latest feed. Mum did seem to concentrate on the tiny chick more and it seemed much more interested in food.

I wish all children would sit and wait their turn like our little peregrines. Their table manners are exemplary.

Anyone else think they look like little penguins sitting there?

KerrySuffolk said...

I was watching Pensylvannia birds earlier in the week and saw Mum grab one of the chicks by the wing and drag it accross the nest platform so she could brood it. Could this be the kind of behaviour people think looks like an attack?

Anonymous said...

Perhaps the Team could explain to us, after reviewing the video, what they think was going on at about 11.50 am.

Anonymous said...

I saw a feed at 13.37 but have not seen one since. Have I missed one (I did have visitors for about an hour or so)?

Karen Anne said...

I also saw some really odd behavior earlier. The Mom was moving around it and fussing for a long time over one chick. I wasn't sure if she was trying to tuck it under her or what, but I had never seen anything like that before. Her back was turned, so it was hard to see.

I'm hoping we're all just wigged out from losing the first one.

Currently her back is turned, so just a small bit of one chick is visible.

Karen Anne said...

Phoebe, some birds "double clutch" if they lose the first set and it's early enough to do so. I don't know if peregrines are among those.

Phoebe said...

@Julie, yes I saw the chick at the edge too and it did look like it was being scolded and dragged back in. All looked a bit aggressive though. Maybe when the team look at the video they will be able to tell us more. It would be interesting to see a video of that scene.

@ Karen Anne, thanks for the info, I know some other birds have more than one clutch but don't know if falcons do.

Mum has just left the scrape and the chicks are still sleeping.

Anonymous said...

Watching a feed at 7.45am, two chicks up and feeding however the little one has not moved. Rather worrying!

Karen Anne said...

Apparently feeding time, although the parental unit is in the way, so I can't see what's actually happening. All three chicks look alert.

John B (not the sloop) said...

Phoebe - Peregrines normally have a one shot breeding cycle but can start a second clutch if it's very early in the cycle say, for instance, the first clutch was lost shortly after laying.

With a month from lay to hatch, nearly six weeks to fledging, then "flight school" there's just not time to get more than one brood to the airworthy stage.

Tom Stephenson said...

I've just tuned in and seen an adult standing for a long time over a prone chick, then read the previous comments. A bit strange, but not the first time I have feared the worst for no reason. It still looks like an odd posture though. Time/video will tell.

Anonymous said...

Mum is fussing again over the smallest chick and all does not look well.

Anonymous said...

The smallest chick seems to be lying on its back and either won't or can't get up even with Mums help.

Jane , Syston Leics.

Anonymous said...

The chick is on its back and seemingly unable to right itself. Perhaps that is why mum is fussing.

Anonymous said...

Is it me or is parent serving up another chick as a meal for the other two?

Was it dead already? Or is parent killing off own chicks?

Ava

annie said...

Just checked and parent still appears to be standing on youngest chick, is it going to use it as food for the other two?

Assuming prone chick is dead, did it die of natural causes or was it killed by parent/other chicks?

Is that what happened to the previous one too?

Nature can be so sad and brutal at times.

Annabel

Anonymous said...

I think it must be you, Ava, as you suggest! I have been watching since early morning, and the parent has been showing great concern over the chick..... and certainly hasn't killed it, or been feeding it to the other chicks!

We must wait to see what is happening......

J.Law Derby

Anonymous said...

I think that mum is very much aware that something is seriously wrong and the chick is either dead or dying, far from serving it up as food I think she is trying to help it, peregrines are surely not that desperate for food that they would eat their own offspring,they are pretty much at the top of the bird food chain, I think we have lost another chick - very sad but nature has a way of weeding out the weak

Phoebe said...

It is quite worrying to see this chick it is obviously in some sort of distress. Maybe it has some broken bones it seems unable to sit up like the others and the parents constantly fussing with it. Is anyone watching the live stream? Maybe could tell us more.

Ruthie said...

Would a parent kill a chick it knew it was never going to grow to be able to hunt and sustain itself?

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

The smallest chick has been on it backsince for some hours this-morning. Live view shows that it is frequently kicking its legs, trying to right itself. The falcon has protected the chick from the heat of the morning sun, but obviously doesn't know how else to assist.
I'm told there are instances where young chicks fall over after a huge feed, though three or four hours does seem a rather long time.

Anonymous said...

sorry to say but it looks like another one of our chicks has died ,whats going on theres only two eggs hatch at brighton ,just hope there isnt something contagious going through the peregrine population.

Anonymous said...

It looks like another one has died and mum is trying to help it. Its really sad to watch. If this is the case lets just hope the other 2 flourish.

Anonymous said...

That smallest chick does seem to have some sort of structural problem. It spent a lot of yesterday on its back, wriggling around - when not lying completely still and raising my paranoia levels. The Falcon was behaving very strangely to it, as though trying to chivvy it up. It appears today is no different, she’s being very attentive towards it. I wonder if there’s some congenital problem, because an injury would seem unlikely. The Falcon was off the scrape just now and you could clearly see it was struggling. It also has a rather unhealthy colour compared to the other two.
RJ

Anonymous said...

it doesn't look good for the little one, is there anymore news from the live feed please?

Phoebe said...

That poor chick looks like it won't survive, how much longer can it be like this...

Anonymous said...

know it's nature but it is so sad to see the chick suffering and watching Mum looking helpless to do anything. The other two chicks are huddled together in the corner and the dying/dead chick is on its back with neck flopped to one side

Anonymous said...

Oh dear, looks like we've lost another one. Very sad but hope other two thrive.

AnnieF. said...

On a more positive note, if even two chicks are successfully raised the parents will be doing well, won't they? Although it's sad to see a chick not making it, and doubly so probably for the children watching, I feel we should be careful not to react as though they were human babies. This how the natural world is, and most of us living in towns and cities have to some extent become divorced from this reality. Don't get me wrong - I've invested a lot of my own time and hopes, like everyone else , in this pair and their chicks, and I do feel the pain; but we shouldn't get sentimental, for the sake of the children watching.

Phoebe said...

Thank you team for the update on the poorly chick, it must be painful to watch.

@ Ruth, it appears the peregrines will not put this chick out of its misery, it will be interesting to see if it recovers but it doesn't look favourable at the moment.

Terri said...

Very sorry to observe this turn of events, but as someone has already mentioned, that is nature and we can't expect everything to be cute and rosey when we choose to watch nature in the raw, so to speak. Praying for the other two to do well.

Anonymous said...

@AnnieF

I agree. The outcome for this chick is uncertain but this is nature and failure to thrive happens with inevitable results. We still have two healthy, lively chicks for which we should be grateful.

Karen Anne said...

Poor Mom and Dad. I know they feel this just as human parents do.

I hope the surviving two are okay.

Phoebe said...

Just a thought, I wonder if there is something caught up in the chick, fishing line or something similar, it does seem to be surviving otherwise...

Not sure if it was fed at the last meal as the falcon had her back to us.

Anonymous said...

This may seem very ignorant of me but is it possible for any of the project members getting involved and helping the chick or would that be interpreted as interfering with nature.

Jane, Syston.

Anonymous said...

Where is Dad? Has he been with any food lately, I haven't been able to watch for a while

KerrySuffolk said...

17:34
3rd chick looks weak, but still moving.

Anonymous said...

That poor little thing has been trying to get up all day, it's so sad to watch

Demelza, New York said...

The poor little chick is breaking my heart. I wonder why the mom can't turn him over.

Phoebe said...

Tea time for the peregrines I can't see if the chick on its back is being fed but I would think that it will be.

katie said...

i must say although it is part of nature watching this is very frustrating as you just want to help or end the suffering!
but i agree it is natural and if this baby was to survive may not flourish into a good hunter.
does any body know how large the broods normally are i remember when i last watched the pereguines around 3 years ago they only had two. 4 seems large brood so naturally some may not survive however please enlighten me

Anonymous said...

Wish we could see what's happening, mum flew away, came back but can't work out if she brought food, she has her back to us, the two big chicks are in the left hand corner and can't see but guess that mum is trying to feed the poorly chick, I'm sure it is still alive. poor little beggar it is having a slow death, wonder if it is poison or genetic?? Have the project team members any idea and can't they do anything to help?? I know we cannot interfere with nature but it seems so cruel to sit back and do nothing - feel helpless and upset

Anonymous said...

I really thought mum was feeding the poorly chick to the other two chicks a minute ago - and it was still alive ! She was stood over it and appeared to be pulling at it and then turning to the others to feed them. Then suddenly she was on the platform edge with a large white prey item in her left foot, it definately had a green ring on it's leg, she then flew off with it - and the poorly one is still there, alive. So sad.

Anonymous said...

I cannot watch any longer, it is so sad but good luck to Mr & Mrs P, the two remaining chicks and the project team x

Tom Stephenson said...

The adult took away the feed-carcass at around 18.00 hrs, the returned to lean over the stricken chick, moving it slightly and 'protecting' it with wings. The other 2 chicks are cowering in a corner now - 18.07. The adult seems concerned for the prone chick and does not seem to show signs of giving up on it right now, but without video streaming, it's difficult to tell if the movement is caused by the adult or the chick itself. I think the chick is still alive and moving it's legs around, but not sure. Not good though.

Phoebe said...

Another feed!

Anonymous said...

Looks like mum is trying to nurse the poorly one, where is the male in all this ?? Has he been seen lately, has something happened to him ?? God forbid !! Can anyone from the project team give us any answers ?

Karen Anne said...

Mom (or Dad?) had some prey off in the corner, and when she was off the little one I could see that the latter was trying to right himself.

Mom is still trying to help it, either tried to feed him or touching beaks, and now she is cuddled over him again.

I wonder if some bird expert out there might guess as to what would cause an inability to get off his back? General weakness? A skeletal deformity? Poor guy...

Anonymous said...

Mum is still nursing the poorly chick, she has her back to the other two and is keeping the little one warm. I'm pretty certain it won't survive though, it's been on it's back now for over 10 hours and can't have been fed during this time either. It's such a shame, and something we're not used to, having watched them rear all their other clutches to fledgling stage & beyond.

Midge said...

Oh, please God, the little chap has just righted himself. What a fantastic mother our peregrine is. She has tended this chick with such avid devotion all day. Wouldn't it be wonderful if all her attention paid off. I am realistic enough to know that it probably won't but she deserves for this chick to survive.

Midge said...

Now, looking straight back to camera, his head appears to be resting the wrong way round on Mums wing. The miracle seems a long way off.

KerrySuffolk said...

20:09
3rd chick has moved. Has it righted itself?

John B (not the sloop) said...

Katie - In Peregrines a brood size of 3 or 4 is considered normal. Exceptionally 5 may appear. When it does the parents have to put in serious overtime and unless prey is abundant and easily acessible the chances of all 5 getting to flying stage are remote.

Anonymous said...

20.28 It looks as though the chick is up and being fed. Difficult to absolutely confirm though.

Phoebe said...

I have been through my screen captures from this afternoon and found this one:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/38218115@N05/4615877029/

where I can clearly see the poorly chick in an upright position and being fed! He is the one closest to Mum...

Phoebe said...

Sorry I hadn't sent this picture to the Derby pool here it is again for those who could not see it.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/38218115@N05/4615877029/in/pool-derbyperegrines

Midge said...

He is on his back again but looking more alert. Oh please, let this little chap survive. Of course, it has to be a boy - the girls are always stronger. This has been the first trial we Derby Peregrine watchers have had to endure and I am sure we are all suffering the same pain. We know nature can be cruel, but to our babies!!!!!

The Project Team said...

The project team has been discussing the current situation at length this evening and phoning various experts to try to get a better idea about what may be wrong with the chick.
We now have various strategies in hand depending on whether the chick survives or dies.
As has been said many times before, this is nature that we are observing and we do not intend to try to intervene and rescue the poorly chick - these are not pets or zoo animals.
Similar scenes are being acted out, unseen, at peregrine eyries on cliffs, quarry faces, church towers and pylons even. The only difference here is that we are observing nature at work.
While birds try to maximise the number of progeny they produce, various factors intervene to stop them. These include natural things such as disease, parasites and predation and more recently, unnatural, deliberate persecution by man and also accidental interference as a byproduct of our impact on the planet - things such as the effects of pesticides, collision with wild turbines and many others.
As with TV film crews, the harsh reality of nature is brought direct to us and we need to watch it being played out dispassionately and resist the urge to intervene and help out everytime we see something struggling to survive.
Only occasionally should we intervene - usually to counteract some human influence.
So, when young peregrines come to ground at fledging, we feel justified in rescuing them rather than watching them get run over by a bus or car.
In the case of our chick, we suspect that it may have picked up some parasites, perhaps worms in its guts. These will weaken it and alter its behaviour. It may recover or it may die....we must just watch and wait to see the outcome.
If we can discover the cause of the chick's death, then we will consider whether to attempt to treat the remaining chicks when we ring them in a few days time.
Many decisions remain to be taken as events unfold. We hope that blog readers and commentators will bear with us as we steer a course through the next few days.
We do apologise for not keeping you updated as regularly as we would like. The project is not run on a shoestring exactly, but those involved have other pressing work and commitments which means they can't devote the whole of their lives to this project. Please bear with us.....
The Project team

Simon, Blagreaves said...

It is very sad to see and hear of the problems the Derby birds are having this year. One dead, one struggling for life - where will it end ! We all get attached to these birds - its something Derby can be proud about which makes them so important. It is commonly said nature should be left to fend for itself - survival of the fittest so to speak but man has a major impact on wildlife far beyond what nature can cope with and at times I do wonder if at times like this man should lend a hand to repay some of its debt.

Anonymous said...

It all seems very sad. Looks like the second chick is not going to survive (or may be already dead). Do we know if these are new parents? Have been watching the peregrines at Chichester Cathedral and London webcams and note that both parents bring in constant food for their babies. These Derby ones don't seem to have their heart in it.

Phoebe said...

@ Anon 22:18 post - As far as we know this is the same pair that have been at the catherdal since the webcams were put up a few years ago, they do not leave the area all year round. The second chick is still alive and being fed even though it has a problem what is happening this year with the poorly chick is new to us all.

This is a very experienced pair of peregrines that have successfully reared chicks every year. The chicks are being fed regularly and are growing and from what I see they are doing a good job of rearing their young - how you can say they "don't seem to have their heart in it" is most odd. The other two chicks so far appear to be thriving. I have not seen a more attentive falcon given the situation before her.

Anonymous said...

I had a look through last year photos and, given the first chick hatched on the same day, our chicks this year seem noticeably smaller. Perhaps the team, when they have time could comment, as to the likely reasons. Could this be general health, different feeding pattern or of no importance. For convenience, I attach a link here.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/38500597@N07/3546930302/

Tww