Tuesday, 7 July 2009

Not out of the woods yet

As many readers to this blog will be aware, our female juvenile peregrine was found with a permanently damaged wing just over a week ago. She will never be able to survive and hunt for herself in the wild. She has been to the vet a number of times, the last being yesterday, and her future has still to be decided. Colin, a local falconer, has been caring for her since she was discovered and has kindly produced a progress report on Monday's visit:

Not out of the woods yet.
The vet was pretty pleased with the strength and movement in her right shoulder joint. In fact perhaps a little surprised in just what movement and strength she did have. He was pretty impressed at what we had achieved and said I had made a good job. The shot in her abdomen seems to have moved and looks to be breaking down. This does not worry him as the lead level in her blood is very low at the moment.
X-ray of peregrine falcon 010 showing lead shot in digestive system and damage to right wing joint
However what does concern him is her long term care, and where she will end up.


In an ideal world he would like her to be cared for by a falconer, though she will never fly well enough to become a hunting falconry bird. But I believe she will fly well enough to keep fit and enjoy the freedom that flying free brings. The reason he is keen on her being cared for in a falconry background, is the constant contact and handling this brings every day which allows her to relax among people and give her a quality of life. He does not want her to end up in an aviary where, without constant contact and handling, she would revert back to being wild and become fearful and feel trapped. In that situation he feels the quality of life would be very poor, and euthanasia would be his recommendation.

In short, she goes back in 3 weeks time to see how we have got on with her training, and to see just how far her flying has progressed. When I go back I will tell the vet that I will try to commit to her welfare long term; this is something I had not given a great deal of thought to yet, as all I had thought about until now was getting her as well as possible and flying to the best of her ability.

On a good note I have been granted a registration document from Animal Health (DEFRA) for her as her keeper, it arrived this morning.


The project team adds:
Our thanks to Colin for reporting back on the situation following 010's visit to the vet today. It's clear that not only have we - the Project Team - got an obligation to look after 010's best interests, we also have an obligation not to force 010 upon Colin, or indeed someone else, who might feel duty-bound to look after her for years to come when, deep down, that isn't really what they might want or could manage.

The vet is clearly concerned to ensure that eventually there is a long term commitment to her upkeep and quality of life, and it would be wrong of us all if, by our support for what Colin is doing now, we push him into a corner that he never expected to be in. His decision - and ours - need to be made on what's best for all involved, and for now we are immensely grateful to him for his superb care of this injured wild bird.

You have all been so supportive of what Colin is doing. However, we're worried that the intensity of your support via the blog comments might force him into making long-term decisions he wouldn't otherwise make. So we'll continue to support him, of course, in the great work he has been doing but also in what has to be a completely separate and long-term decision which impacts not only on the bird's future, but also on his own.

Footnotes: Another local photographer, John Salloway, has posted a high definition video showing 010's progress. Follow this link to John's Blog

We are expecting an engineer on 14th July to repair or replace our wireless bridge - so apologies for the protracted breakdown in webcam service.

Would anyone spotting either of our two juveniles please leave a comment on the blog for all to see?

67 comments:

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Well, here I am in not so sunny Edinburgh, desperate for news of oh-ten ... and, phew, so glad to see she's still with us. After the initial euphoria, I note there are still concerns, not least for Colin who has been left somewhat holding the baby. It worries me also that that blooming shot has still not passed through. I'd like to give a big hurrah to Edinburgh - not only does their library have internet access, but it's cost me nothing. I'd also report that en-route to the west coast, I went to Loch Garten and saw their magnificent Osprey project. Didn't persuade husband to detour to Derby on the way up .... maybe I'll have better luck on the way back!
Sue not-in-Bucks at the moment

John B (not the sloop) said...

I'd be really surprised if there was nobody out there willing to build a life long and rewarding relationship with #010.

If she becomes reasonably airworthy various career prospects beckon which do not require her to hunt and kill. Airfield bird dispersal, environmental education, and falconry displays spring to mind.

The alternative would be to snuff out this young life which would be a tremendous pity.

Phoebe said...

My apologies to Colin.

I feel I owe an apology for an earlier post I made regarding Colin being the best person to have and take care of Oh-ten.

I wrongly assumed that he would be happy to keep her. On saying that I do understand that it is not to be taken lightly, she will need a lot of care and dedication and I know Colin has a busy life with his other birds, who are not wild.

Because Oh-ten has become so special, wherever she ends up people will want to visit her and this is something else to consider. If she were truly in the wild without human intervention she would probably have died. If she is to live I hope that a suitably experienced person is found who will be able to give her the loving care and devote their time to her.

I agree with John B (not the sloop) regarding a career for Oh-ten, there must be someone who can give her a happy fulfilling life. We could feel proud then that we have given her the opportunity. (I just wish I were a Falconer!)

I also believe that if she cannot be given a happy and healthy life then euthanasia would be the better option, despite how we all feel we have to do right by her.

Anonymous said...

Glad to hear 010 is ok for now. I am sure that all involved will make the best decision for her welfare. Great effort been put in by all!

Lets not forget the other juveniles!
Have both been seen recently?

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ All team members and Colin.
Thanks so very much for your latest report on 010. Sounds like there is plenty of hope for her yet. I don't think it is going to be easy for anyone to make a decision one way or the other. I am sure no one wants to knowingly put any pressure on anyone to commit to long term care. I feel that there is someone out there who will do it and do it really well. I certainly will be praying for that and for the well being of 010 what ever decision is made. She has spunk and made it thus far I know she will continue to thrive in the wonderful care that you Colin have given her so far. What ever you decide we all know will be the best thing for all concerned. I don't think anyone has any doubt about that. We will support the team in what ever you decide knowing it was made with everyone and everything taken into consideration. May God bless you all for the magnificent job you all do so well. Many thanks for helping to give us a good reason to do our best to make a difference in this world and to switch on this little box everyday we call a computer.

Audrey (London UK) said...

Thank you so much for the update on 010. I hope that all turns out for the best, whatever decision is made, it cannot be easy for the vet or Colin.

Karen Anne said...

I am so glad 010 is doing okay.

I know what a tremendous responsibility life long care of an animals is, so I totally understand the decision Colin has to make. I wore out after caring for my elderly cats with long illnesses and currently do not have a cat.

I hope that if 010 can't stay with Colin, that another falconer can be found for her. Perhaps Colin or the team members know some other falconers whom they trust whom they could talk to about this if it comes to that.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ All our friends on this blog. I have just posted a Friendship Card on my blog for everyone on here. If you would like to see it. Just click on my name it will take you to the blog. I hope it will inspire us including my-self to make some changes and do an even better job of taking care of our friends and including nature's friends.

Phoebe said...

I would welcome a report from anyone who has been to the Cathedral Green to see the peregrines. Are they all still okay and flying around. Has there been any mid-air food passes? Have they learned to catch their own food yet? Anyone who knows could you please update us.

PS. What is the situation on the webcams, I see they are still down?

Colin said...

I am glad to give 010 a home and indeed she seems content. And if she continues to do well and is comfortable I enjoy the time we share. To be honest i don't think she will fly well enough to be used for bird dispersal or perhaps flying displays, but never say never. Enviromental education seems a good idea and she seems a falcon with the right disposition and temperament. I don't mind being her keeper and if she can be used education that would be something she could fill. The problem lies with me not being up to the mark when public speaking but more than willing to support a a confident speaker, she is amazing to see close up. For me its not really hard to commit to her , I think the world of her its more about me stiffling her and not giving her the best use of her life and giving her some sort of fulfillment. What I am saying I am happy indeed honoured to be her keeper. But realise they could be better options for her in the future.

Pax Canada said...

I was so happy to hear that 010 is continuing to thrive, and now I think that despite what we as individuals would like for 010 we must step back and let the project decide what is best for her,I would like them to know I stand behind them and am just grateful that they give us a glimpse into these beautiful birds life.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Colin, thanks so much for your commitment to 010. I knew that everything would turn out for the best. She will indeed bring you much pleasure and I am sure will serve a very useful purpose in educating the public and our young ones. Children are my passion as much a nature. You will be well rewarded in so many way. I know you already have been and will continue to be. That you already understand. We all wish you the very best of times with her and in the rest of your work. More people like you are needed. Cheers Colin and bless you in your efforts to protect and care for this very special creature, that has touched our lives in a delightful way.

MEL said...

Thanks for the update Colin. I'm sure no-one could say you are stiffling 010 and if she gets through this and it comes to taking her to educate people in whatever way, offers in help would come your way to write/produce/put over to your audience whatever you would like to say to them. If that is what you would like us supporters of the site to do, just let us know.

Thank you once again for your tremendous help to 010. It is a pleasure to keep up to date with your blog entries.

Karen Anne said...

Hi, Colin,

Thanks for the update and for caring for her. As long as she is happy, I think her being in any sort of educational thing or whatever is of no significance, just my opinion.

Karen Anne said...

Jon has a video of 010 at
http://derby-peregrines.blogspot.com/

Alas, I can't get it to play. Has anyone figured out why vimeo fails for some people? Thanks.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Jon Really loved your video Jon. This really helps us to see her progress. I like to call her "Hope" Thanks for posting it and sharing this wonderful experience with us all. Hope there will be more in the future.

Karen Anne said...

Jon changed his video setup so that his video can be downloaded. I followed his directions, and if you join vimeo there will be a download button in the lower right corner of his video page to download the video into Windows Media Player. So that takes the net connection out of the problem.

I did that and got it to play on my pc with a number of freezes, etc. Apparently it is very high definition, ex: he says it takes a few seconds to download to his system, but it took about five minutes to download to mine, despite my having a high speed Internet connection.

I have a reasonably up to date pc, and can watch instant movies from netflix, for example, with no problem, so I think either the data is massive and only very high end pcs can handle it, or vimeo has some optimizing work to do. At the least they should have a viewer option to play in a lower res.

But, whining aside ;-) it is great to see 010 in action, taking a short flight in the open. Such a beautiful bird.

Tom Stephenson said...

It's interesting (leaving aside Colin's predicament - sorry!) to see from the x-ray how heavily structured the leg-bones of Peregrines are, even though we know they have to be. Poor 010 is probably also serving a useful purpose right now in providing data as to what does actually happen when a bird ingests lead shot, which could be used by future specialists. Oh well, look on the bright side...

Pam said...

Karen Anne ... I had problems with the new video too. It stopped and started several times until it fully loaded and then it played fine. It is a good one, and well worth persevering with.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

What a lovely video of Colin and 010 on his blog. (I also had problems viewing it, but didn't have any difficulty viewing his earlier video on Vimeo).

Just to report that I've taken a call from our Network supprot company - they're going to send out an engineer to check/replace the faulty wireless link from the Tower to The Silk Mill Museum. It looks like it will still be a few days before we're up and running again.

Meanwhile thanks to you all for your patience, but most especially for your understanding of the position we are all in with regards to the care and welfare of 010.

Wendy (Dorset) said...

Can I please direct you (though you probably know them well) to our fairly local marvellous falconers in Hampshire at www.hawk-conservancy.org

John B (not the sloop) said...

As an aside - for those of you still experiencing withdrawal (ie everyone probably) the New Forest National Park Authority/RSPB [Goshawk webcam feed] has now been switched to a nesting Hobby. She's still on eggs and has about a fortnight to go before they hatch.

Unlike Derby cathedral's celebrity residents Hobbies aren't the fastest living things on the planet but they are undeniably jaw droppingly good looking birds.

Phoebe said...

I just watched the video with no problems. It's really good to see Oh-ten out and exercising her wings, she ate her meal with confidence, Colin you are doing a great job, she is so beautiful I can completely understand how you feel about her. Could I please come to see her, I've been wanting to for a while now?

Audrey (London UK) said...

Just watched Jon's video of 010, a sheer pleasure to watch, Thank You!! Hopefully this magnificent bird will, in time, be flying free, fingers crossed.

Colin said...

010 flew in her fashion a few mis judged landings which included my head and shoulder, but she lifted of the block and made 15 yards or so to her split rations, which she ate on the fist. Really pleased
with her effort. I suppose over the next few weeks we will see if there is any further improvement.
And yes I know of the hawk conservancy.

simon said...

hi colin just watched the video on your blog, great progress. I'm glad that you are taking great care of her, and are able to keep updating us on her progress. And that she hasn't gone to someone else who prob wouldn't feel the need to report her progress back to us all who have been watching her since she was an egg on the cathedral, thanks again simon

Pax Canada said...

@ Colin, thank you for the update on 010 good to hear she is coming along well.What other birds do you have?

Terry, Herts UK said...

I don't think I'd be too keen on a falcon heading straight towards me and mis-landing on my head!

Time for a hat perhaps, Colin? :)

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Colin. Well Coin your latest report on 010 "Hope" sounds really possitive and I think we shall all be encouraged by it. She certainly seems quite content I gathered, from watching Jon's video. I can't wait to see her and by then the progress will probably be considerably more. Hopefully she will be able to educate children and adults and enjoy human company, if this is to be her reason for still being with us. Please keep us up to date I enjoyed your blog Colin. I am still learning how to do them. It's all so new to me. Hope your saw my friendship rose I posted on my blog and the poem I made up.
@ Anyone Has anyone been around the Cathedral lately and have anything at all to tell us?

Anonymous said...

Hi Colin, I'd just like to ask probably a silly question. Is it not possible for a veterinary surgeon to manipulate 010's shoulder into the correct position under anaesthetic and strap it up if neccesary for a while ?
I think you are doing a wonderful job with her, and I love keeping up to date with her progress through the photos, video's & updates. Dorothy

wayne1984 said...

hi everyone i have now updated my blog fully and almost upto date. so if anyone wants to take a look then feel free. the pictures are in no perticular order, although the ones further down my blog are more recent at the moment.
yesterday i walked through the green on my way to the hospital and noticed the adult male sat on the ledge, i did get a couple of shots although not much movement at all.
on my blog there is updates from myself from going with colin and his peregrines, i hope the pictures do the expereiance justace.

wayne1984 said...

sorry my blog address is http://peregrine-pictures.blogspot.com/

Colin said...

@ Dorothy and all.
The vet did try to relocate the joint while she was under.To have stood any chance at all, it needed to be treated with in hours of the accident, and because she seemed to have dissapeared from view for a week or more before she was spotted again, when it was aparent she was not quite right, I guess her shoulder was damaged perhaps a week or more before hunger forced her to perhaps try and fly. She did really well last night and flew better than I anticipated. Good headway even from last sunday.

Karen Anne said...

Hi, Dorothy,

I'm sure the project guys and Colin can answer this better, but I believe 010's shoulder was said to have already healed in the wrong position. If it were a new dislocation, that would presumably be different.

Now she's in the situation sort of like when someone breaks a leg and it heals unset, the doctor has to rebreak it to correct it. Not quite that bad, but a huge stress for a delicate animal.

Anonymous said...

Hi Colin, I will respect whatever decision you want to make on the birdie. Thank you for taking time to look after her. Jennie, Hong Kong.

Anonymous said...

Colin & Karen-Anne, thanks for your reply, it was just a thought, I think I probably already knew the answer. I'm so glad she's going to stay with you Colin, as Simon said, someone else may not feel the need to keep all her fans updated who have known her since she was an egg !! All the best, Dorothy

Karen Anne said...

I'll add, my cousin dislocated his shoulder years ago, and from time to time it spontaneously dislocates again from very little cause.

Tom Stephenson said...

Can he catch his own food though, Karen?

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Glad to see all still going on OK with 010 - TOUCH WOOD! That X-ray shot made me wince, makes you realise what a nasty break she suffered, not at all apparent from the pictures of her looking magnificent. Does anyone have any news/sightings of the other family members? I was interested to see the Hobby info - they might not be a match for the peregrine in many respects but what IS amazing about them is that they migrate (speaking of which, can anyone recommend a good book on migration - not necessarily just birds. I'd like it to have a big map in it with routes shown. I'd love to observe the autumn migrations - I guess Gibralter would be a great place?)

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

OH, PS - meant to say, have finally joined the RSPB, on the strength of some of the great things I've seen on my holiday walkabout. We're all singing off the same songsheet, I guess - but Derby will always feel so much more personal to me :)

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Sue: don't know a good book on migration such as you require. While some birds follow well defined routes, others migrate on a broad front - the hobby is one of these, only showing up at well known raptor migration watch points in small numbers. SW Spain is excellent - we go to Tarifa, to the hills just to the East where the migration in September is spectacular - we've seen the sky just full of raptors and storks slowly drifting south - a fantastic sight.
Where to watch birds in Britain and Europe - by John Gooders (Hamlyn) is an old book but there's a table in it showing which species can be seen throughout the migration season which starts in August with white storks and finishes in October/November.
I also recommend An Artist on Migration by Bruce Pearson (HarperCollins), one of our top UK wildlife artists. He journeyed down to W. Africa, watching our UK birds as they travelled south, painting them en route.
As for the marvellous hobby (my favourite raptor!) - try the excellent monograph by Anthony Chapman simply called The Hobby (Arlequin press). A very good read.
Nick B

Anonymous said...

Hi Colin,
You are in a bit of a jam here because I understand to some degree, its not only about commitment, time, money or love of a creature, its about what is fair to that creature and as much as we love them all its very, very difficult to put yourself 'outside of the box' because you are so involved and have been since the very beginning. I don't envy you my love but can only thank you a million times over for what you are doing and will be 100% behind whatever decision is made by the team. No pressure then?! God bless you Colin. Christine x

Jon Salloway said...

Confirmed sighting of juvenile No 11 yesterday on the local police stations aerial mast. He was with the falcon. No others seen.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Thanks, Jon, for sighting updates (am I misremembering or do I correctly recall our birds are often around police premises ... they are very law abiding!) Thanks also to Nick (DWT) for the migration info. I have a sneaking preference for hobbies too (don't tell our gorgeous Derby peregrines). I recall that last season a wonderful piece of artwork from Derby Museum featuring hobbies and dragonflies was posted on this blog. I have masses of migration info to wade through now, thanks, should keep me busy. I also had a brainwave - I should see what the BTO have - a very interesting website exists at http://www.bto.org/birdatlas/index.htm
Now, how to persuade husband we need an autumn break in southern Spain as well as several trips to Derby ......

Karen Anne said...

Jon,

Thanks for the update. Having no webcam is like sending your kids off to college and they never write :-)

That's a great second video of Cathy on your website. She is looking so well. And for some reason this one plays okay for me.

Colin,

How is her weight doing? It wasn't clear to me from the question on the video if that was okay? She is looking great flying, even though she can't fly at full capacity.

Pax Canada said...

I was just wondering when 010 was
named? and why that name was chosen, was she named because she will never be a wild bird? I am so glad she is doing so well.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

@Pax Canada
To answer your question, if you click on Colin's name in one of the above entries, it'll take you to his site (alternatively, I belive there's a link back on the Derby site somewhere) Follow through the entries there to find the answer you're looking for. I think Colin has the right to call out something other than 010 when he flies her but I'll not extend that privilege to myself - I shall continue to call here 010.
If you click on Jon Salloway's link, you'll get to the videos that people have been commenting on.

Colin said...

I named her Cathy as she was from the Cathedral, orignal I know :)
It got to the stage when I was calling her off and I needed to call her something. And I gave her the name there and then. She was fed of the lure tonight, I can hoist the lure higher on a carbon pole, once she as took her meals on it for a few days, and got use to it to encourage her to fly higher. It was clear she expected her meal on the fist, but eventually she realisd there was something interesting on the lure. @ Karen Anne her weight is fine and she is in real good health.

John B (not the sloop) said...

All the Hobbyphiles seem to be coming out of the closet just now so I may as well declare my hand as well. These dashing and handsome little falcons have long been a personal favourite for me.

We have one that patrols the River Wye corrider quite regularly at Yat Rock and it's appearances invariably lead us to abandon the telescopes in excitement no matter how well the resident Peregrines are posing. Even Goshawks don't normally have that effect.

simon said...

i've never been lucky enough to see a hobby in the wild yet i've been looking but they're quite hard to spot by all accounts low to the ground and very fast. the only goshawk sightings i've heard off is in wales, does anyone else know of any other areas as these are hard to spot aswell. but for me you cant beat the peregrine what a bird.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

@Simon (and other hobbyphiles)
Hobbies returning to this country gather around the Tring Reservoirs in Hertfordshire. If you google "Friends of Tring reservoirs" you can see there's always a "welcome back the hobbies" walk - this year it was on May 10th. Presumably, the hobbies also gather there for the return leg???? They disperse to I know not where to nest - I think those who do know keep it secret because there is always a lunatic fringe who can't be trusted not to harm the birds. If you can make it down to Tring, maybe see you next year. I saw them this May - they fly really high up at that time, looking like giant swifts. Indeed, a hobby took a swift and I thought it a bit sad that the poor swift had just made a huge journey just to end up as dinner. As we say over and over though, it's nature's way. I can't really pick a favourite bird species - they're all special in their various ways. I'm also extremely fond of ravens, just to be really controversial! But, I've said it before and will say it again, Derby and its peregrines are the best of the lot - can't wait for the camera to come back on line, am really missing it.

Pax Canada said...

@ sue, thanks, I have looked at the videos, but cannot get any of them to play.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ COLIN Well I hae to say if I may rather disappointed in the name that was chosen for 010. Oh I know you can't please all the people all the time lol. It's just a sad blow for me. I call her "Hope" I thought she brought me so much hope in the future for nature and humans. For personal reasons I can't share I despise the name Cathy. It's not your fault Colin don't feel bad. Just could not have chosen a worse name for me. Oh well I know she will do wonderful in your care what ever her name is and you certainly had the right to call her what ever you wanted. I will try not to hold it against her lol lol :o) Any news on the cameras yet? Also any more sightings of the birds around the Cathedral?

John B (not the sloop) said...

Simon - I've yet to see a Hobby hugging the terrain like Merlins often do but treetop height is quite usual as they hawk for dragonflies around gravel pits etc. I've seen them much higher when chasing hirundines around later in the season.
Any substantial areas of woodland with big conifer blocks can yield Goshawks these days. The Forest of Dean is pretty good.

Tom Stephenson said...

Sue - I am also very fond of Ravens, and I don't see why not! There are plenty in the Bath area these days, and I'm looking forward to the arrival of Red Kites. I remember when it was big news that the first pair of Buzzards were to be seen nesting near Bath. Now there's loads, but sadly not as many as seagulls.

Colin said...

@ Anne her name to others can be a name of their own choice, she perhaps represents many different aspects and aspirations to her follower's. I have been impressed by her "desire" and "spirit" to get her self back on the wing. Many have seen the X-ray and find it hard to believe she can fly at all. But Cathy to me links her to Derby Cathedral from where she whence came. Can I say a big thank you to all that have emailed me, wrote comments on the blogs offering support and wishing Cathy all the best. Writing is not my strong point so if I have not replied, it does not mean that they are not appreciated its great to know people care.

Terri said...

Just looked in and found no diary updates since the 7th. I just want to add my voice to some of the other comments, to say I will respect any decision that's made with regards to 010. Colin has been put in a very difficult situation but it might turn out to be a very rewarding and life-changing one for him, only time will tell. I'm sure we're all behind you whatever you decide.

By the way, I think Cathy is a great name for her. Puts me in mind of Wuthering Heights, that Cathy was never really free to fly either... so sad.

Sorry I've not had chance to go through all the comments on this page in detail - still wondering, have there been any sightings of the two male juveniles recently?

simon said...

hi sue and john thanks for the info, sounds like 2 great spots to watch the hobby and the goshawk. My family might appreciate me taking them to see some different birds instead of the peregrines even tho they seem to love them to hard not to really. John thanks for pointing out the difference between the hobby and the merlin, when i wrote it thought it sounded like the merlin. i did a falconry course in edinburgh this april they had a merlin there 1st 1 i'd seen great little bird, i've probably got more chance of spotting 1 now i know the difference, come on the cameras, kind regards simon

Terri said...

Wonderful video Jon. She is so beautiful and looking so healthy and contented (apart from wonky wing of course) - many thanks for that.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Colin. I am with you all the way Colin. "Hope" she will be to me and as you say she may be something else to someone else. It's been a tough year the loss of our home and all. Then marriage break up in the family etc.etc. My husband and I have been put through the worst of it this past year. Keeping a watch on the Peregrines has kept my mind off it most of the time. I was so sad when we lost one of the juvies and then 010 being injured. Seems like a bad year for so many humans and the wildlife. Habitat being destroyed everywhere. You are doing a truly wonderful job Colin and I wish so much that there was more that my husband and I could do more to help. Other than change how we purchase things what we purchase and educating the public that is about it. I guess every little helps right! Looking forward to seeing her in September and I will take you up on your idea to call her what ever she means to me. Can I bring you anything from Canada Colin?

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

@Colin, your writing is just fine and you know we're ALL on your side and very grateful for all you're doing with "our" bird. It's incredibly kind of you to keep us posted too with updates in what must be a really busy life for you. You'll never please all of the people all of the time with whatever name you need to use for birdie-010 so don't worry!
@Tom, I felt a bit guilty going off topic about ravens, but they're pretty magnificent birds. I went to Shetland for Up Helly Aa this year and the place is full of them! On "the day" a raven flag also flies over Lerwick Town Hall, which I thought a fine thing. Clever birds, ravens! I have been known to go to the Tower of London just to look at the ravens (OK, I'm a bit weird) We have tons of Red Kites in the Chilterns and they are now spreading rapidly, I'm sure they'll get to Bath soon - I predict down the M4 corridor, where they can find lots of carrion.

Tom Stephenson said...

@Sue - another off-topic spin-off!: My 2nd favourite film (by Powell and Pressburger), "I know Where I'm Going". 1st favourite (by same): "A Canterbury Tale". Lovely.

John B (not the sloop) said...

Simon - If you're really wanting to find Hobbies then Shapwick Heath in Somerset ought to do the trick. Hobbies appear in large numbers whenever there's a dragonfly hatch and seeing 50+ in a day isn't unheard of. Details here [Shapwick Heath NNR] though it doesn't specifically mention Hobbies.

To be honest any lake or gravel pit which attracts flocks of swallows, swifts and sand/house martins can produce Hobbies throughout the second half of the summer.

simon said...

thanks for that john with my job i get plenty of time off and my wifes a teacher so the big 6 weeks are coming up so i should be able to get down there thanks again. And if anyone wants an oppotunity to name 4 peregrine chicks there's a competition on the malham cove websight to name the 4 chicks and win a goody bag from the rspb, i've named my'ne but i'm not going to tell u incase u pinch them. good luck and a bit of fun whilst the cameras are down all the best simon.

Anonymous said...

has anyone seen the other youngsters or adults? i went past today and saw one falcon on the nest box.do not know which one as i was without my binoculars and scurrying back to work. any news please?

becky

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

(Sorry, having another "blonde" interlude - previous typo'd comment removed and this corrected one made)
@Simon, a place with MASSES of drangonflies is the WWT place at Welney. I don't know if it also gets HOBBIES but it's well worth a visit anyway. It's just down the way from the RSPB Ouse Washes. We went on a Welney "canoe safari" a couple of weeks ago and it was quite magical - the air was full of dragonflies and damselflies - so any passing hobby would be able to have a banquet! Welney is usually my place of winter consolation - it's sad when summer goes but the wonderful Whooper and Bewick swans come back.