Monday, 29 June 2009

More Sad News

Since the video by John Salloway was posted showing all three juveniles last week, some of you may have noticed that there have not been any moments when all three young birds have been seen together since. There is a reason for this, and we have thought long and hard over the last few days about what information to make public – and when.

As you know, we have always stated that we would not attempt to capture any bird, adult or juvenile that seemed to be injured or ill. But if found on the ground or elsewhere unable to fly, we would do our best for such a bird, for example by returning a juvenile to the top of the tower. That position has been tested this last week, and the situation is still unfolding, and our stance may yet change.

On Wednesday last week we had a call from the RSPCA - the major UK animal welfare charity. They had been called by a security guard the previous evening who had found our remaining female juvenile falcon (010) grounded inside the former police station just across the street from Derby Cathedral. She seemed unable or unwilling to fly, so their animal welfare officer collected the bird and, unable to make contact with us at that time of the evening, took it to a specialist welfare shelter some miles away for overnight care.

The next day Nick B. collected 010 from the animal sanctuary and brought her back to Derby to release her. Although 010 had eaten well and looked bright eyed, the sanctuary owner expressed some concerns about the bird’s wings and so Nick B asked our local falconer Colin P. to check the bird over before she was released.

At it happened a number of people, including Colin, had noticed that this juvenile had been reluctant to fly on the tower over the previous couple of days. This indicated some sort of problem and so, armed with this knowledge, it was decided to get some expert opinion about her condition. Colin agreed to look after her meanwhile and he reported back that 010 had adapted to captivity quickly, continue to eat lustily and was very calm, making her an ideal patient.

It also turned out that the RSPCA were involved with a BBC TV programme called Animal Rescue 24:7 which focuses on animal welfare incidents. The programmers had asked if they could film the story to be broadcast sometime next year. We agreed and a film crew turned up to film the bird at the sanctuary and her return to Derby, though by then we had decided she should not be released.

The following day Colin took 010 to a local vet who agreed the bird was not 100% and referred her to a second vet with specialist skill in treating birds of prey. There she was X-rayed and was found to have dislocated her left shoulder joint some time earlier. This had gone back into place and had healed - but in the wrong position. This vet felt it was unlikely that she will ever fly again, though the bird was not distressed or in pain as far as he could judge. To make matters worse, the X-ray also revealed that she had at a large shotgun pellets inside her gut. The vet assured Colin that 010 had not been shot directly, but had probably ingested the pellet from a prey item she had fed on, which itself must have survived being shot.


What these pellets are made of is of great concern. It's most likely that they will be standard lead pellets, in which case there is a considerable risk that, if they don't pass though her body naturally (or after giving her an enema to attempt to flush the lead out), they could be digested and enter her tissues. This would eventually result in lead poisoning. Blood tests have been taken and we await the results of these later in the week. If at any stage she exhibits signs of lead poisoning it seems inevitable that 010 will have to be put down at some stage before she deteriorates and suffers further. But so far she appears healthy and well and is a very gentle-natured bird, and is certainly being very well looked after.

If it turns out that there is no lead poisoning – just a weak left wing - the vet’s opinion is that it would probably still be wrong to keep her penned up for the rest of her life, unable to fly. By contrast and depending how she progresses, Colin thinks it might still be possible to exercise her sufficiently such that she could fly a little, even if she can never hunt for herself.

So what do we do? The answer is we don't yet know. We have to think of the bird's welfare first, and what is the best course of action to take. It could be a hard decision to make to put down a wild bird that could face the rest of its long life in captivity; but it would be almost as hard for us to decide that she should remain alive, knowing she might never fly wild again, and certainly not hunt for herself. 010 will be returning to the specialist vet during the week for the results of the blood test. We will probably also try and retrieve and bring you the x-ray which clearly shows the injury she has experienced.


We visited 010 earlier today, and she was calm and at ease in her new environment. In the first picture above she had just been sprayed with water in an attempt to encourage her to preen and move both wings. That she did with ease, though it was clear that her right wing is being held in an abnormal position.


We hope you understand why we decided not to go public with this unfolding story until we knew more about the nature of 010’s problems. It is possible that you may have views which will not coincide with whatever decision the Project team and the veterinary experts decide upon. But rest assured that whatever it is, we'll attempt to do the right thing for falcon 010, and will keep you informed of progress during the coming days.

However, in view of recent unwelcome comments left on this blog when falcon 009 flew into a glass panel and died a week ago, we do not want to see a recurrence of inflammatory remarks being left about 010 which then deteriorate into an unhelpful and aggressive slanging match.
We think all readers of this blog - including children - deserve better. So for a short period all new comments to this post will require pre-moderation by a project member.


Finally we would also like to thank the RSPCA who took in 010 and who met the cost of the initial vet's fees, and to P.Nurse of Ambivet for his care and concern. Over the weekend she was also visited by one of Derbyshire Police's Wildlife Liaison Officers and her possession at the moment by an experienced falconer has been registered in accordance with UK law. So, most importantly, our thanks to Colin P. for his care and concern for this poor falcon.
Latest Update (29/6/09): The vet's blood analysis apparently shows low levels of lead in her body, which is good news for now. She is scheduled for another check-up next week.

108 comments:

Julie said...

Very sorry to hear this news. I wish you and 010 all the best and have every faith that, no matter what the outcome, she will be well cared for. Good luck. I will keep watching and reading.

Pax Canada said...

What sad news, so glad she is being cared for.

Karen Anne said...

I am so sorry to hear about this, and am glad she seems comfortable.

I do not know much about the programs in the U.S. where birds who are too injured to be returned to the wild are cared for. I have heard of largish structures these programs have within which the birds can fly. One I just found on the web is said to be 20x100 feet, but others seem smaller. Of course, that is not the wild.

I think the birds are usually taken occasionally on school visits etc. for educational purposes; I have never been sure if that is good for them or not. I attended one such event and the rehabilitator said the birds seemed to enjoy the variety of the visits from their normal situation.

If it were me, I'd want to stay alive, but I am not a wild animal.

Audrey (London UK) said...

So sad to read about 010 - it must be heartbreaking for all involved. Hopefully the eventual news will be good. Whatever happens, I know that all concerned will make the right decision, no matter how painful. Fingers crossed for a good outcome.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

My head keeps reminding me that the hard statistics are only a 25% chance of young peregrines making it through their first year - but my heart's another matter. What IS 100% though is my trust in you, the project team. I am just so sorry that you have this heavy burden to bear, the least I can do is give you my total support in whatever you decide is the right thing to do.

Phoebe said...

This is sad, I knew something was wrong somehow... It was 010 who fell from the nest wasn't it? I wonder if that is when she damaged her wing? She did fly afterwards though. The shotgun pellet by law should be steel, if it was a rifle pellet it could be lead. On the other hand if she has eaten a water bird the water bird could have consumed the lead weights used by fishermen. I do hope it is not lead. That poor family have now only got two boys left in the wild. I know the right decision will be made. Thanks to Colin for looking after 010 for us.

Pax Canada said...

one on the tower cam,one on the nest ledge

degadar said...

The reality is only a tiny percentage of birds ever get to survive and grow long enough to breed and have offspring of their own.

It's the price you have to pay to get and keep the perfect genes that make our Peregrines so special.

Don't be any more sad than you should be. And, as sad as it is, it's often best that we don't get too involved, just because we can.

Terry, Herts UK said...

Sad news indeed.

But I'm heartened by the great & good people who have rallied round and are doubtless spending a lot of time caring for the falcon; worrying about the moral decisions to be made; informing us all, etc.

May your God be with you.

Anonymous said...

How very sad to hear of 010's plight. I'm so pleased though, that she's being cared for, and is well fed & comfortable. It's only my personal view (I know you will make the right decision for her)but I would like to think if 010 turns out to be unable to survive in the wild, her personality should be taken into account when deciding her fate. As she seems calm and quite at ease with people, I'd like to think she's given the opportunity to live as long as she seems to be coping well in captivity.
Wishing you all well at this sad time. Dorothy

Colin said...

News from the vet this evening, lead level is low which is Good.
She is to be xrayed again monday to see if the shot has passed through.
No need for sedation as metalic objects show up well. Yes it is 010that fell from the ledge but was uninjured at the time, and flew well for several days before what appears to be a collision with the Catherdral, though she will never reign the skys again as a free bird. I hope that she will be able to fly free,if under supervision.
At the moment it looks as she is pain free and comfortable and well settled with a great nature, and eating well.I have one or two tricks to stimulate her to exercise her wings, which seem to be working, though it is apparent that one wing is at a wayward angle. Its very early days but I am confident she will have some abilty to fly.

wayne1984 said...

thanks for the update colin, maybe she will be able to fly to the extent of your young birds today???? of which i am honoured to of helped, i feel 010 is in the best possible hands and hope your predictions are correct.

Pax Canada said...

@ degader, you may be right :)
but as the Garth Brooks song goes
"I could has missed the pain, but I'd of had to miss the dance"

Pax Canada said...

two on the tower cam

Karen Anne said...

There are two peregrines on the pudding cam area, quite close together keeping each other company in the dawn light that seems to turn the cathedral pink.

I can't see their markings to tell who they are. But they seem about the same size, I wonder if that means they are the two boys. The poor parents.

Three photos on Flicker.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Colin, the Project members and other people who have involved in this rescue. Jennie, Hong Kong.

Joy said...

Was out all yesterday so have only just found this latest sad news.

Thanks to everyone for taking care of 010 and I'm sure the best decision will be made.

I have now got the task of telling the grandchildren who have been following carefully when they are with us.

Like people say we mustn't get too emotional as its nature. I just hope she doesn't suffer.

Pax Canada said...

one on the scrape

PaulF said...

I have been watching since the pair first arrived and feel like I have been part of there lives forever.
So sorry to hear of 009 short life and as sorry to hear of the disability incurred by 010, but hoping that her life can be prolonged without detriment to her quality of life

Tom Stephenson said...

Ref Phoebe - The law is that shot fired over water (or at water-fowl over land) must be steel or bismuth. Shot fired at pigeon or any other bird over land can still be lead. My understanding is that lead shot consumed by a raptor like Peregrine will not cause any long-term problems, as it should pass through the bird in the same way that it passes through us when we accidently eat pellets in pheasant, etc. Poisoning problems may occur in birds which grind up food in crops, and - correct me if I'm wrong! - Peregrines don't have them. Shot which is embedded in flesh forms a coating which prevents it from oxidising and releasing toxins. So I believe that 010 may be destined for an indolent life, not lacking for food if lacking excitement and further danger.

Terry, Herts UK said...

There are some brilliant photos of 010 on Colin's blog.

click here

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Thank you for the update, Colin. Your news of 010 is indeed Good with a big capital G!! Your news sounds hopeful, the best of all being that she doesn't seem to be in pain. It's sad it had to happen but she was lucky to "fall on her feet" as it were and have such a great person to nurse her. Keep us posted, we're all rooting for her.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

My first read through of the account was very hasty - I just wanted to "cut to the chase" and find out how 010 was. However, having read through again, I can see that there are a number of "hidden heroes" in this story to whom thanks are due. We have our own Project Team and Colin and Wayne, of course, but three big cheers to the RSPCA, not just for taking 010 in but for meeting the costs of the initial vet. I guess P Nurse (what a great name!) is the specialist vet? Who's been paying his bill? Thanks to everyone who has been involved in this story.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Well the news sounds a litt more encouraging to-day. I am sure all concerned will make all the right choices for 010. We will all be thinking about her and praying that the best thing for her will happen. Thanks to all those working on the problem and giving us updates.

SIMON said...

Colin i think that the derby project is lucky to have a great team member like yourself to help out with your falconry experience. And a great shame that 010 has become injured if you think she can fly but not hunt, and she seems happy being captive, instead of putting her to sleep,which to us all would be terrible, would you think she could be trained and used at a falconry centre for displays and educational school visits for the kids.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Birdie in the LHS of the tray

simon said...

i think it would be fun for us to name 010, instead of her ring number to cheer everyone up, my suggestion is boomerang, with her having a strange angled wing, and she'll always come back.

David...Telford said...

I am saddened to hear the news about 010 (these lovely birds have become part of my life during the recent months) and yet I am exhilarated to read of the care, love and concern a 'mere feathered beast' has generated.

It is a great sign that so many people can put aside there own real-life worries and concerns to focus on the more 'micro life' of a pair of falcons and their offspring.

Costs being absorbed, nurse giving time, Colin and the 'Team' spending so much time with hands-on care. It gives me a warm glow of happiness to read the forum post.

I applaud and thank you all....

Anonymous said...

I don't envy anyone the dilemma of what to do with a peregrine that can't hunt.

I guess there is no way of getting the wing re-set with any reasonable chance of an improvement in her ability to fly?

Initially I would say that nature should take it's course but as 'we' have interfered already (and I totally agree with the decision to do so). There is a responsibility now to look after her.

Not wanting to pre-empt any decision taken by people better placed to judge than I but are we, the blog supporters, now also about to adopt a falcon ?

Chris, Alrewas

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Is there any further news on 010? I do hope she will be ok. I know that who ever is taking care of her will do their best. The choice will be made no question about that. Sounds like she has a lot of spunk. Praying for her recovery at least so she can live a somewhat normal life.

Anonymous said...

Terrible news again but I for one completely trust the project team to make any decisions, they are indeed the experts and have put so much into helping the peregrines. Maybe if 010 had actually got older and begun hunting for herself it would be more of a blow to not be able to fly free but what you haven't had perhaps you don't miss so much?

Phoebe said...

Food being prepared up top, Dad sitting on the scrape.

Derek - Bolton said...

So sorry to hear about the injury to 010, hope it does not result in a short life, I am sure that such would be a very last resort. Regarding the earlier comment regarding Fishermens weights - lead was phased out many years ago and it is now illegal to sell weights not made from safe material. Thanks to all who are working to get the best result for our young star.

Anonymous said...

sad news indeed but i too have the utmost faith that the project team will make the right decision for 010 - and she surely couldn't be in any better hands right now than colin's.

steph (canada)

Karen Anne said...

Colin, that is a wonderful picture of 010 on your blog.

Okay, I'm going to throw discretion to the wind, but she looks so calm in that photo, I express the hope that she will be able to live even if she can't fly normally.

Is that you in the photo, Colin?

I wonder if the problem of people taking your photos for sale would be avoided if the larger versions that you get when doubleclicking were marked, but the small ones were not? I don't think they could sell the smaller versions, but with no markings it would be easier to see the photos?

Anonymous said...

What tragic news especially after loosing our other female fingers crossed she will pull through,regarding the lead maybe from a shot pigeon or crow?Lead is still legal for shotgun shooting as long as wildfowl are not shot at if this is the case steel or tungsten matrix has to be used.

Pax Canada said...

bird on the scrape

Anonymous said...

sad news indeed but i have great faith that the project team will make the right decision with regard to 010 and there's no doubt that she is in the best hands of all right now....many thanks to colin.

steph (canada)

Anonymous said...

I would keep the bird captive. It's a great experience to handle a bird of this calibre. 25 years ago in Tenby, I was asked to help a falconer with a female with a healed broken wing. It was marvellous experience to have the falcon sitting sitting quite calmly on my wrist. My young son's comment was "Wherejagethatfrom?"! Look after 010, and she reward you.
BobofFife

Ruthie said...

Thank you for the comprehensive update even if it isn't the good news we would have liked to hear. It sounds as if 010 is having the very best care available and any decisions will undoubtedly be made with great care and compassion.

wayne1984 said...

@sue, sorry i can not take any credit for this latest rescue as i was as shocked to hear about it as the rest of us. but thankyou anyway. aalthough i have been involved in other things with the project over the last few months.

John B (not the sloop) said...

It's tough being a young Peregrine and the chances of all four offspring making it beyond their first year was always pretty low. Sounds like #010 is receiving the best possible care anyway.

I once had the privilege to have a young male Hobby perched next to me on a dining room table in Cambridge. He had lost a wing in an accident and spent the rest of his days, quite contentedly one hopes as, a "stud muffin" at a raptor conservation project in Hampshire.

Pax Canada said...

bird on the tower cam

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

I,m sitting reading this on the Somme (France) _ struggling with a totally screwy keyboard and everything in French ..... but anxious to keep up with any news. I was pondering on the journey, what a cruel year this has been for females, thinking of dear Froona and our two female peregrines. If bad luck comes in threes, lets hope this is the end of it. Looking forward to checking out Colin,s website - but I can,t face the challenge of it from this French PC!!!!

Colin said...

010 is doing well, Any questions or querys I will try to answer.
@ Karen Anne yes its a rare pic of me.

Pax Canada 6.27pm said...

one on the tower cam one on nest ledge

Jackie said...

What sad news this is. I am so pleased that she has all the care she needs at this time. I understand how hard it is to make the right decisions for her welbeing but I am sure that you will make the right one when it comes to it and am with you all the way.

Anonymous said...

What is that in the top left corner of the nest view cam? It looks like a puff of smoke, but has been there for ages.

Phoebe said...

@ Anon

I thought it looked like smoke at first but I think it's a downy white feather. No birds on view at the moment I wonder where they are...

Anonymous said...

Colin, I'd just like to say how fantastic the photo's on your blog are, the expressions on the faces of the children are inspiring - and dear little 010, she looks like she's taken to this change in her life like a duck to water, so glad she continues to do well. Dorothy

Anonymous said...

I am so sad to hear this news BUT I know all the 'team' will do their very best for her.

You all do great work and I love coming to this blog each year to marvel in these beautiful birds.

Thanks again!

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Colin or any team member.

Should 010 not be able to ever fly and hunt for herself. Will it be possible to give her a home somewhere. I have watched so many programs on T.V. here in Canada that show people and place that take in animals wild or domesticated that can't fend for themselves. I think as humans being we should do all we can for any animal, bird etc. That is why we have vets. Could you please try and explain how you can exercise the wing and what you feel the chances are of it working.
@ Canadians
HAPPY CANADA DAY.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Thanks to everyone for your best wishes and thoughts on oh-ten's welfare and future.

@Ann (Canada)
Colin has offered to write something for us to go in a future blog when we know a little more. This won't be immediately, but I'm sure in time he'll explain a litle about how he exercises and encourges the birds to move and stay active.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

@ Project Team Member ( Derby Museum)
Thanks so much for answering me it is much appreciated. We will all look forward to Colin's explanation of what he is doing to help this beautiful bird. I know you will all do your very best for her. Just hope she will find a home if the worst comes to the worst. A Great big thanks to all those who are caring for her. I can't stand to think of any living creature suffering.
(Big hugs)

The Chief said...

Tough decision to make. It's not always wise to let nature take it's course. Many species would be extinct if man hadn't intervened. Let your hearts rule your head and pull out all the stops to save this beautiful bird.

Anonymous said...

@ Ann (Canada)

and a very Happy Canada Day to you too!!!!
Nice to be able to check the site out from home in the middle of the day.

steph (canada)

p.s. can anyone provide a link to colin's blog? i thought i had it but it's disappeared to i don't know where!!!!

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Colin's blog can be found by clicking his "name" and then folowing the link to Falco peregrinus in his profile.
Or load this adderss into your browser:

http://derby-falco-peregrinus.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

@ project member (derby museum)..

thanks for that info...have now got to colin's site....wonderful pics.

steph (canada)

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Phew, great to be back in "Bighty" with a keyboard that I can understand! Thanks for the reminder about where to find Colin's website - I KNEW it was obvious but couldn't dredge it up from my memory. I've saved it in my "favourites" now. Hey, oh-ten looks a darn fine bird for an invalid [Colin doesn't look so bad either :) ] Actually, it's almost unbelievable to think just a few short weeks ago she and her siblings were tiny balls of white down - how quickly they grow. On the web-cam, there's nothing to gauge their size by and it came as somewhat of a shock to see what a whopper she is now!
HAPPY CANADA DAY to all Canadian "Friends of Derby Peregrines". I thought of you today as I saw the Vimy Ridge memorial. Is it just a coincidence that Canada Day also happens to be the same day as the WWI Somme "big push" is remembered? (Sorry to stray off topic - but I did also keep my natural history eyes open while on my WWI "pilgrimage"! I saw 3 ??sparrowhawks?? at Thiepval and listened to skylarks singing their hearts out)

Colin said...

I will write a detailed plan of action, just need a little time.
Not great at putting the english language into words.But she is well
and already shown she has a disliking for crows. My son went rugby training tonight near to Darley Park,during this time I gave 010 some carrige on the fist, I was quite moved by what followed
I noticed she had tilted her head looking skywards I looked up to see a lone peregrine to far to make out if adult or Junvenile she then gave out a call opened and flicked her wings few times before
coming to rest again. I have to say it brought a lump to my throat.
I wonder what was thinking. Took a few photos to day I will make them availble sometime latter to day.

Colin said...

I just have to say she has voluntarily stepped up on the glove to feed at 12.15am a tiny step towards me, a little show that she is being to trust me.I have never been so determined to succeed, in giving this falcon a quality of life, though it be second best to living free.As I type she sits on my left hand watching.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Yes please do all you can to give this bird somekind of life. Life in captivation has to be better than death. God gave us people live Vets and people like Colin. How can we turn our back on these creatures of God. It is us that caused the problems in the first place. Now we know better right? So we have no choice but to correct those past mistakes and do what ever we can to preserve this species.

Pax Canada 6.59pm said...

one on the scrape

Terry, Herts UK said...

Fantastic, Colin.

May I please urge everyone (& your families & friends) once again to support the RSPB in their work against the illegal persecution of birds of prey.

Two links below. The first may require parental guidance for very young kids as it features traps and a dead falcon.

Peregrines persecuted

Take action now

(BTW, I am just a RSPB supporter - not directly involved).

Thanks

Karen Anne said...

An adult, I think, is napping on the nestbox. Photo on Flicker.

Pax Canada 8.33pm said...

still one on the nest ledge

Pax Canada said...

@ Colin, wonderful pics of 010, she is getting so much love and attention, maybe when she looked up and cried out she was saying "I'M ok, I have found a friend" :)

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Webcams down. Thursday 2nd July 08:25am.
We are aware our cameras have frozen and hope to resolve the problem by this afternoon.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Hey Colin, I'm incredibly impressed that you can type with a whopping great peregrine sitting on one hand (and very jealous). Your account of 0h-ten "talking" to one of her family touched me too, thank you for sharing this with us. As I say, from the photo of her, you look as if you're doing a fantastic job and Oh-ten certainly looks to be a natural born film star - that haughty look into the camera lens - it puts me in mind of Manet's "Olympia" with that confident stare at the viewer.
PROJECT MEMBERS - I've won a free "Derby Cathedral Quarter" shopping bag and if spotted shopping using it get the chance of another prize. I will come and collect my bag at some stage (from Quad, I think it says, wherever that is!!!) but I'll pass it on to you and I'm sure you'll be able to think of some way of putting it to good use.

John B (not the sloop) said...

I would echo everything said by Terry (Herts).

It has been a particularly grim year for Peregrine persecution so far. Please help get more "sign-ups" to the RSPB's pledge.

Like Terry I'm just an RSPB supporter albeit a pretty active one.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

John B and Terry
I certainly signed up - it's a no brainer for any friends of Derby Peregrines. However, lots of Derby bloggers are non-UK, I wouldn't have thought that it's possible for them? (or even that all would necessarily be aware of what the RSPB is) The campaign is about more than peregrines but again, a no brainer - interested in one sort, interested in all (and it broke my heart to hear that a Golden Eagle had recently been found dead, probably poisoned, in Scotland) For anyone who signs up (certainly in the UK) the RSPB sends a nice free booklet about birds of prey, as I can personally testify. I'm sure there will be a later appeal for funds, but it's not an obligation.

Karen Anne said...

If you click on the sign the pledge link in the RSPB page, you get a page that says they are having web difficulties and to try again soon. I hope they fix that, it seems to have been broken since yesterday...

It looks like a depression has been scraped in the nestbox, like the one for eggs. if I remember correctly, this is a usual post fledging bonding event.

Kishore said...

Its well documented that the survival rate of these birds are very small either in the urban environment or in thier natural habitat. My take on this is that this youngster should be given a chance to survive even if it means being taken care of by humans - perhaps some day she will get better and hopefully be able to fly and look after herself. Having seen that humans still persecute these birds for thier own greed I feel it should be upto caring people to give these birds every chance to survive. Colin - take a bow. You're doing a fantastic job in giving this bird a chance to survive.

Phoebe said...

Colin,

Thank you so much for your posts at 00:05 and 00:37 on 02 July 2009. I must say it brought a lump to my throat too, I was stifling back tears (we emotional humans!) but that’s the way we are!

I know that these Peregrines do fly and hunt close to where you live so I have no doubt that it would have been a parent or sibling that Oh-ten recognised. It’s good to hear that she is starting to trust you but she is young and vulnerable and these birds in my opinion are far from stupid, they are quite the opposite. It does sound like she recognised the other Peregrine and wanted to go fly with it but could not because of her wing.

This is a very emotional time for all of us who only want the best for her and you have a huge task at the moment, one of which you are dealing with extremely well, we are so lucky that you are around and willing to help. You are doing a magnificent job!

Oh-ten has become a very special bird; she sounds like she has an incredibly good nature, and it would be a shame for her to lose her life because of this injury when she seems well in every other way. I do prefer to see these birds in the wild but as said in a previous post, we intervened in the beginning so we should try to give her a good, healthy and long life, as best we know how. She is adapting to captivity well from what you say, so there is, in my eyes, no reason for her not to have a good life.

I look forward to more information as and when you are able to post it. If you want any help with the write-up I am willing to help with that

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

I agree that Oh-ten, whilst very unlucky to have suffered injury and possible lead poisoning, certainly made up for it by the appearance of a wonderful guardian angel in the form of Colin - I don't think she could be in better hands. I assume that it's now looking as if she could make a good physical recovery? The issue with this so far as considering any release back to the wild is that oh-ten will have learned to trust humans, a very dangerous thing. Unfortunately, the world is NOT populated with people just like Colin. I'm no expert, but I feel this will be the big issue - one of the tough things for the project team to have to determine. I think they have a pretty good idea of where the strength of feeling is from us guys though and I still trust them implicitly to make a wise decision.

John B (not the sloop) said...

The RSPB's pledge link seems to be working again. I'm rather hoping that the web page outage was due to sudden high demand following today's Peregrine persecution news release which the Daily Telegraph has picked up.

Anonymous said...

If you look at the video of her falling from the ledge her wings look different - may be why she fell?

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Comment Moderation - your thoughts.

At the moment the Team are able to respond quickly to comment moderation, but this may not always be the case -especially at weekends.

In due course I would welcome your views on how this is working out.

At some times of the day it would slow down the ability of webcam viewers to remark on a bird doing something in real time, and it would also reduce the use as a means of general chat back and forth between readers.

Remembering that Blogger is a tool for running a blog, not a discussion forum, is comment moderation a good thing that some/all of you would welcome?

In some cases it has been the over-reaction of our own blog readers to comments left by non-enthusiasts which have exacerbated problems and then driven others away. (We've had a number of direct emails expressing thoughts on the deterioration of the site's effectiveness as a place of information for adults and children alike.) Knowing that we'll never please everyone, how would you wish us to address this?

With 61 blog entries so far this year, attracting around 3,500 comments, putting in full-time moderation would inevitably slow down the degree of communication between ourselves.

I know I'm asking you, the people that use comments the most, so you're inevitably biased towards their free and immediate use, but it's right we listen to your views as much as possible when we look at the future of this blog. Our partner organisations do have obligations to ensure blogs and other social media are used appropriately, so any problems we allow to occur here could jeopardise their willingness to permit further use in other areas of their work. For all three partner organisations this blog still remains their first and sometimes only foray into the use of social media to deliver services to customers. I'm keen that it won't be their last, too.

Anonymous said...

As a matter of interest, have you disallowed many comments after the news of 010 or do you believe that moderation has discouraged the sometimes unpleasant comments from being posted?

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

I'm not aware of the size of the problem with inappropriate blogs but I am aware that it puts another strain on the Project Team. I'm all for free speech and opinion but what is wrong is illegality and hiding behind anonymity. If somebody has strong opinions, they shouldn't be cowards and hide their identity. Is there any way of getting registrations before allowing people to make entries? Then, people can say what they want, but in the certain knowledge that their comments can be traced by the Project and everyone else can see who is saying such things.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Oh dear tough question to answer. I do think however it is a pity we have to answer it at all. It's sad that it may come to permanent moderation for the sake of just a few people who like stiring up trouble. If this is the only way we can stop it then I don't see what choice we have to agree to it on a permanent basis. I repeat if this is the only way. Maybe there is another way? I suppose suggestions have been tried. I know it's difficult to ignore those unwanted comments. However if we can't do that then we will have to be in this state of moderation continually. I'd rather have that than the comment shut down. Well at is my two cents worth for what it is worth.

Anonymous said...

As an infrequent poster but a regular reader it would seem that the delay caused by moderation is a small price to pay to prevent 'inflammatory' comments being posted. It does the project no good when this blog becomes a slanging match.

It is good to know when peregrines have been spotted in the webcam views, but I do not think that there is any great urgency to know, it is just good to know they are around and OK. This seems to me the main advantage of immediate posting so if moderration helps acceptance and therefore continuance of the project by the partners it is fine by me.

There has been a 'conversational' aspect though with some of the postings on here (I am not complaining) so I look forward to the views of those contributors whose conversations would become very long winded!!

Chris, Alrewas

Audrey (London UK) said...

I have no problem whatsoever with the board being moderated. In fact I think it is an improvement. I always felt that some 'anonymous' contributors just liked to wind others up for the sheer h*** of it hoping that others would rise to the bait!! Then again I could be wrong. On a lighter note I do miss 'the family' have not caught a glimpse for a few days.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Sorry, I notice I didn't fully explain myself - I MEANT to say with registrations (should this even be possible) "offenders" should first be warned and invited to remove their own entry. If this doesn't happen, the administrator could remove it and then also remove their registration. However, I don't think it would even come to that with registration because I don't believe anyone would knowingly post something offensive.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Sorry, I notice I didn't fully explain myself - I MEANT to say with registrations (should this even be possible) "offenders" should first be warned and invited to remove their own entry. If this doesn't happen, the administrator could remove it and then also remove their registration. However, I don't think it would even come to that with registration because I don't believe anyone would knowingly post something offensive.

wayne1984 said...

May i suggest the idea of getting a small team to monitor the blog on behalf of the project team?
this way then it takes some of the preasure off the other team members to do what they do best?
on a different note, as some of you are aware i have been helping Colin flying his birds,
i have to say that i was very very suprised at how much freedom and a good life these birds have in captivity, i didnt realise just how much work goes into keeping peregrines i am truly astonished on how much work it involves.
as a bit of a thankyou to Colin i am in the process of posting some pictures of these sessions on my blog so if anyone wants to take a look, keep watching this space.

Pax Canada said...

Pax Canada there are a lot of blogs you have to register and give an E.mail addy so a lot I dont join,but in the case of this one where I feel we are a community :) I would not mind doing it at all, I think you might have to E.mail the addy back as a
confirmation that the E.mail is legit.
The team while doing an excellent job do have lives of their own, and if this would help them so be it.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

I agree with Pax Canada that with one or two notable exceptions, we have bonded into a community. The birds have brought so many people, all over the world, together. I wouldn't want to lose it now we have it - I always enjoyed and learned as much from comments as from the cams, even when on the odd occasion I don't share a view. But Pax, the Team have a lot of other work duties as well as a life outside work - the peregrines are just a tiny fraction of their duties. They perform miracles in the circumstances. I'm painfully aware of not wanting to burden them too much. Wayne has made a good suggestion on this topic.

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

By the way, I've really missed the web cams today - any news on an ETA for fixing it?

Karen Anne said...

I think moderation is working surprisingly well.

I know it causes more work for the project team, and that I regret. But at least at this time of year, immediacy of comments appearing does not seem important, I think we're checking in to see if anyone has seen the birds lately and to carry on discussions, both of which work better than I had expected with moderation.

The comments are much more peaceful with bad posts not getting through, and I don't see any reason to let them. It isn't as though we're going to change the minds of those posters.

I don't think registration is sufficient. It does allow law enforcement to track people who make actual threats, but for lesser harassment it is easy for someone to re-register with another email address which ISPs usually provide to their customers and just appear again.

Like Wayne, I would be willing to help remove comments, but I suspect the Trust, etc. feels it needs to have only their folks as moderators.

Anonymous said...

Colin Pass is amazing with all birds he came my flat the other day, as my pet cockatiel was ill to help me give her nebulizer treatment. He has a great understanding of birds, if anyone has a chance to help and rehabilitate 010 then Colin will be able to do it. Good luck Colin & 010 !

John B (not the sloop) said...

Sadly I believe that moderation is a necessary evil. Most other webcam comment forums have it. A useful alternative would be, as has already been raised, a registration requirement involving a valid email address. A "one strike and out" policy could be adopted if necessary.

Clearly career troublemakers could repeatedly keep setting up new Hotmail addresses etc to circumvent being locked out but this is a bit of a faff and such people would hopefully tire, go away and get a life.

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

@ Colin:
I haven't commented for a while, but have been reading daily about the ups and downs of this little family, I wanted to say (and i'm sure it echoes many peoples thoughts and comments) that it is amazing what you are doing for this beautiful falcon, and how fortunate she is to have been placed with yourself. You must be so honoured to be given this opportunity, and it's so reassuring to know that she is in the very best hands, i'm sure with your help and guidance she will continue to flourish, I wish you and 010 all the very best and thankyou! :)

Anonymous said...

Sorry to see webcam pics still frozen, but as it's currently pouring with welcome rain, it's good to be reminded of yesterdays glorious sunshine!

Ruth Z said...

Any (more) poetry lovers out there?

High Flight

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
Of sun-split clouds, — and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of — wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there,
I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air. . . .

Up, up the long, delirious burning blue
I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark, or ever eagle flew —
And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

By J. G. McGee Jr

A beautiful piece of writing. It was written by a WWII pilot yet never fails to bring pictures of soaring birds to my mind.

Have a good weekend everyone.

Julie said...

Ruth - that is my favourite poem as well, I remember my mother reading it to me as a child - and yes, it also conjures up images of high flying birds and total freedom to me as well. Beautiful.

Re the comments on moderation - I agree it might be a necessary evil but also feel that the registration idea might be worth trying first IF it can be done without too much trouble.

Phoebe said...

@ Ruth, that is a lovely poem - I agree it makes me think of birds too, of the feathered kind!

Karen Anne said...

Wondering about the state of fixing the webcam?

Phoebe said...

Moderation - I think Wayne has a good point, I would be willing to help cover the moderation, it is working well but I understand there is a lot of work involved.

Karen said...

Recommended to look at the site by my Dad, David Sherwin in Buxton.
We feel that the falcon would better off in some kind of bird sancutary where it will be looked after, given a good quality of life and it won't have to hunt for it's food -as it's so young surely it would adapt to it's new surroundings?
It would also provide children and adults with the ability to view these wonderful birds close up. It would be nice to re-home it near it's birthplace -is there anyone out there that can provide it with such a home?
Please lets show some compassion about this animal.
I would really appreciate a response to this comment. Karen

Sue in Bucks (Scout) said...

Does anyone from the Project have any updates, especially on the status of the web cam?

Colin said...

@ Karen and all, not to keen ending up in a avairy at a centre. For one she is a wild bird with an inbuilt fear of man, and it appears of late to be with good reason. She needs handling and manning everyday by some one who understands Peregrines inside out, Plus I believe now 100% she will have some abilty to fly free, and if this is the case, I for one would like her to have her freedom if only for a short period each day.
Plus the more she users her wing the more movement it will keep and help to keep arthritis in future years. At the moment she is bright eyed in good health and I guess as comforable as can be expected, as i am writing she is enjoying a bath. She travels well in my van which is fitted out to carry falcons, as she spends as much time as possible with me. So I guess she could visit places of education and let children and adults see one in the flesh and up close up. But all this is way in the future, my first goal is to get her flying free. She at the very least deserves a chance to fly free with air under her wings and the breeze in her face. On another note it might be known to a few I breed peregrines. When I registered 010 as myself as her keeper I decided that she could not be used for any commericial gain like breeding from her or making any money from her in any way. I do hope that in the future many of her admirers can see her, for she is very special. The only thing in my eyes that hangs over her, and i don't think there is a problem is the shot in her gut, if she gets all clear at the vets on monday. She has a future :)

Tom Stephenson said...

Re the RSPB's Pledge - I haven't yet read it (I will at earliest opportunity), but I have read a report of a survey carried out by the Countryside Alliance and the Gamekeeper's Association which - they say - has the full support and backing of the RSPB. In it, they say that there is overwhelming support amongst the public (that they questioned) for a relaxation of the laws protecting predators, in favour of other wild birds. How this relaxation would impact on Peregrines and birds of prey in general is pretty easy to imagine, as they include the word 'raptors' in that category.

I don't believe for one minute that these proposals will ever get past the statutes, but it is important for as many people as possible to know of the C.A.'s intentions in this area and question the RSPB's involvement with them over it.

I have no intention of being inflammatory in this blog site, but the subject is of absolute relevance to the topics discussed, and I do hope that the moderator will pass this comment on - at least to those contributors who have been urging us all to sign up to the RSPB's pledge.

Tom Stephenson said...

Re my last post - It seems as though the involvement of the RSPB with that survey was only implied by the CA, as one of the statistics mentions the public support for the work of the RSPB. So apologies to the RSPB for casting doubts - they are still as despised by the CA as ever! It's still important to see what gamekeeper's have got up their sleeve, however.

Nikki M said...

Unfortunately, according to a recent RSPB report, it's looking like a really bad year for Peregrines:
"This year looks like being one of the worst on record for crimes against peregrines."
RSPB report

Project Member (Derby Cathedral) said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
chrisx said...

I have great faith in the Project Group: whatever your decision - it wil be best for 010.

I will try sending Reiki - and am sure that any other Reiki Healers out there will have done the same! You never know - it may work!! [ Other bloggers can now please stop falling about laughing!! :-)]

When Colin said he has tricks up his sleeve to encourage her to use a her wings again - I thought 'Yeah - so have - my hands :-)

PaulF said...

Hi
Glad to see the webcams working again
Any news on Cathy 010?