Sunday, 3 May 2009

Up In Front Of The Beak

Up close and personal!

With four peregrine chicks at Derby this year, our parent birds are going to be kept busy keeping them all fed. But they did it last year, and there's no reason to fear that any bird will be left out. Often just a bundle of white feathers seemingly huddled together for warmth and support, it can be hard when they come in view to actually count how many we have. Sometimes it's a case of "count the beaks".


The feeding shots below were taken on Sunday evening, three days after the first two eggs hatched and just 24 hours after the last chick appeared. Our adult male was watching over his young brood for a while, and them mum appeared with food which she had probably retrieved from a nearby ledge. It was a reasonably brief feeding session, and she soon left with the food before returning shortly afterwards to huddle up and keep them all warm as sunset approached.

































Thanks to Dave Arrowsmith for uploading the top picture -and a number of others - to our Flickr group pool. (Now, instead of racing against time to beat Froona to upload some stunning screen shots, as I used to do, it's now a race against time to beat all 50 members of the Flickr pool!)

163 comments:

Project Member (Derby Cathedral) said...

For anyone finding themselves in Derby City Centre tomorrow and in need of a Peregrine fix, I have a screen in the Cathedral!!. It will be available 11.00 - 3.00 with entrance from Full Street. There are also going to be a limited number of Tower Tours. All proceeds will be split between the Cathedral and the Peregrine Project. So, just turn up and I look forward to meeting you.

n1ck said...

these captures are great nice to see all four chicks feeding well

Project Member (Derby Cathedral) said...

Just to quickly update my previous comment. Tower Tours will cost £5.00 for Adults and £3.00 for children aged 8 - 16. This is a chance to see all the equipment that has installed to beam the wonderful pictures direct to your computer!!
Don't miss the opportunity if you are in Derby as places are very limited on each tour.
There will also be tea/coffee etc and a donation box(s).
Hope to meet some of you.
Tony

Anonymous said...

I rarely comment here, and I'd hate anyone to think I'm being rude, but I wonder if it would be OK to ask if we could all try and minimise the number of unimportant comments we place here?

I used to watch the comment count to check for new postings, and usually found an increase meant something interesting had been written, either by the Team, or by the multitude of my enthusiastic fellow webcam watchers. But now there are so many comments with nothing being said in them that I've stopped checking. And then I go and find I've missed some really helpful updates and hints. (Thanks Roger AT and Terry for yours, especially .)

C'mon folks - lets see what we can do with this nice new update to keep it all tidy and interesting!
love to all
Sarah C, Croydon

Karen Anne said...

I respectfully disagree with Sarah. I like to read all the comments.

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 2.01pm
I have to agree Karen Ann, over the years we have got to know one another, and it is nice we can share our enthusiasim for the wonderful work of the project and our love of the falcons.
No disrespect intended Sue

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada
I mean to Sara C

Fi Arrowsmith said...

This is my first time watching the peregrines, i suppose it's easy to get swept along with the excitement of it all, but i do agree that it is good to chat with others that are obviously old hands! Surely that's one of the points of having the blog so that we can all share how we feel about these magnificent birds..........

Anonymous said...

Excellent pictures, please keep it up AND the comments especially if they are relevant to the Peregrins. Joy

Anonymous said...

My husband, ‘RJ’, has been watching the peregrine webcam for weeks. In the end, I got hooked too. Popped home to Derby to see my parents – I was born there – and took a brief pilgrimage to see the nest. Well, it was mostly the ledge but also saw the tiercel high up on the cathedral, before he flew off. Completely brilliant. Couldn’t get into the cathedral or shop (as mandated!) to do a donation, so will make one on line. Thanks to the peregrine team for your wonderful work in bringing the falcons to us all. Caroline

Ann, Birmingham said...

A few minutes ago the sitting parent flew off briefly, presumably to stretch its wings, and there was a very good view of the chicks in a huddle. The smallest looked around for a bit but there was no opening of beaks, so I would think that indicated they weren't hungry.
I quite enjoy the "unimportant comments", but I can understand Sarah C.'s impatience. This site, though, is surely not intended just for the purist? Its mixture of the superfluous/irrelevant with expert technical/ornothological detail may be just what convinces the amateur and uninitiated, like me, that this site is accessible and appealing to everyone? Inclusiveness!

Ann, Birmingham said...

What's that in the bottom right corner of the left camera?

Ann, Birmingham said...

@ Colin: I've just looked at your photos of the aerial battle between the tiercel and the young female intruder, on your Falco Peregrinus page. A superb sequence, vividly illustrating the dangers these parents face. Many thanks, and well spotted & captured!

Ann, Birmingham said...

Another brief wing-stretch by the sitting parent a couple of minutes ago. Only one chick seemed to wake up & look round but again, no beak-opening. The others seemed fast asleeep. All settled down again now.

Mrs B said...

We've been hooked on the webcams for several weeks now, so took a trip down to Derby to see the birds "in person" this evening. We had a fabulous fly past from both the male and female, including seeing her taking food from the ledge up to the nesting platform and then returning it to the ledge a little later. Great to get home and see the screen shots of what was happening up on the platform whilst we were watching from below. Thank you so much to the project team for giving us such an excellent insight into the lives of these wonderful birds!

Roger (AT) said...

Pere-Parents have had the midnight fidgets! Flew out twice, but just for a few seconds. Shots are on Flickr. I still have trouble deciding which parent is which, so I am not sure if it was a shift change or just a stretch of the wings. Chicks were not much interested as no snacks were forthcoming.

@ Joy: did you get multi-windows working ok? If not, please tell me, and I will send you some screenshots explaining how.

jo said...

does anyone know what mom is looking at as she hasnt really settled 2night is it prey i wonder

Roger (AT) said...

Something is really bothering the sitting bird. He / she is staring out quite fixedly, bobbing up and down. Made 4 short flights out and returned quickly. I would like to watch more .. but must get some sleep!

jo said...

fantistic photos colin it's nice to see what they get up to when we web cam viewers cant see them thanks
jo
ps tried to post this comment on your blog but had trouble as i dont have a aol account is there any other way ??
jo

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 7.07pm
mum still does not look settled her head keeps going back and forth like she sees something out there

Anonymous said...

Thanks Karen Anne, it seems images I uploaded on Flickr are not being seen. I'll try again... Cheers, Jennie, Hong Kong.

Roger (AT) said...

@ Jennie HK: I see 3 shots from you in the Group and in your photostream. I have added a screenshot of what I see to my Stream (rejsharp). Tell me after you have had a look, so that I can delete it.

The nest looks peaceful this morning. I wonder what was disturbing the bird last night. The nest looks safe enough from cats!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Roger. I also saw your comment to one of my images. I didn't do anything to my Flickr account but don't know why Karen Anne didn't see me. :( Jennie, Hong Kong.

Colin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Fiona Arrowsmth said...

Lovely to see some morning 'fussing' of the little ones, she's so tender, it's such a joy to watch.
Is anyone going to the cathederal today? I'm desperate too but my children are only very young, I think dave would be a tad envious if I shoot off to Derby and leave him at home!

Anonymous said...

Thankyou so much for all the excellent screencaps of the chicks. They are adorable!!

Sue in Bucks said...

Hey, Derby Cathedral, NOW you tell me the tower's open!!! It's too late for me to try to make the trip from Bucks today but I'd love to get up there next opening.
I'd also like to say I love reading ALL of the blogs. Apart from anything else, it's fascinating to see where we all come from and what a mix of expertise there is. Fantastic that we all have the love of the peregrines in common. And I just don't think we can say too many times what a great project it is; I'm sure the Project Leaders appreciate it and are able to use it whenever they are called upon to justify the project in these hard economic times.
Now, can an expert remind me of when we might expect fledging?

Fiona Arrowsmth said...

Sue, I'm certainly no expert but i think early to mid June, i'm going to take a couple of days off work around that time so i can go and 'hopefully' see something! We live in Stoke-on-Trent and my husband works in Derby so we're lucky to be quite close by we called into Derby yesterday managed to just see the male right up on the top of the tower, but we missed any real action I think it made it a bit more 'real' for the children to actually see the nest box.

Terry, Herts UK said...

About 6 weeks onwards from hatching, I think, so mid-June onwards. Difficult to say precisely though, because some of the young ones will inevitably be braver (or more reckless) than others !

For anyone that missed it, the team have increased the width of the ledge slightly this year to match the size of the eyases' talons - hopefully enabling them to avoid any accidental falls or fledges.

Terry, Herts UK said...

Re: Fledging. This fascinates me. In a few weeks time, we will all be longing for the birds to make their first flights but at the same time be very nervous as they perch on the ledge and stretch their young wings.

Hard to imagine what it must be like, launching yourself into the air with the hope those wings will work and keep you airborne to the next landing place, even though it's in their nature to do so. Can't help but wonder whether they 'feel the fear' or are just full of confidence.

Ann, Birmingham said...

Feeding time!

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

I think dad has just made a fleeting visit!

Anonymous said...

Roger (AT) The only way I have tried today is by bringing up the internet twice, but I only get half a picture, so can't really watch and type. Would appreciate some advice. Thanks

Just been watching a parent feed the chicks and then she left them for a short time. Its super. Joy

Roger (AT) said...

@Jo: Colin is right I had difficulty adding comments to his Blog until I signed up for a free GoogleMail account. So I log into that, and then it works like a charm. Most blogs have some such trick to keep robot spammers away.

Roger (AT) said...

@ Joy: OK lets have one try with description. If that does not work I will make some screenshots.
I assume you are using Internet Explorer. (other browsers work similarly)
a) Open your two widows, set one for the Webcam and the other for the Blog
b) With Blog window open, click on the MIDDLE one of the 3 icons top right (it actually shows 2 overlapping panes). We want to choose "restore down" if it says "maximise when you put the mouse over it, then you have the right view.
c) Now you should be able to grab the right hand edge of the window with the mouse+button and reduce the width of the screen to half. (You can move all 4 edges like this). Do not worry what happens the text or images.
d) Doing this will have exposed a bit of the Webcam window. Click anywhere in the webcam window and it will spring to the front.
e) Repeat the resizing on this window, to about half the width, by grabbing the left hand edge with the mouse, and sliding to the right.
f) Now adjust the heights if needed by grabbing the top or bottom edge with the mouse and sliding up or down.
g) Now move the webcam image up/down & Left/right using the Slider bars on the right and bottom of each image.
h) Note: depending on your screen size, you may not be able to see ALL the Webcam view and Blog text. I put up with letting the two windows overlap each other by 25%. The one you click on jumps to the front anyway.
I just tested my advice on my work laptop so it works with a 14" screen.
i)Note 2. Remember you can move the whole window by grabbing the fat blue strip at the top.

Sorry for taking up so many Blog inches! Maybe others will find such a layout helpful, and show the techno-hubby some new skills :)

Karen Anne said...

Wow, janworldtour, whoever you are,

I can see your photo of the 2006 Derby peregrine on the Silk Mill over at the flicker group. Extremely nice.

Really interesting to see one of the birds out and about in another part of Derby.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Just a note to say that, despite your praises for the Project Team's efforts, we'd also like to thank everyone who is now contributing both questions and answers here.
This is helpful for us, as we can't monitor and answer everything that get's posted here. But between us somehow we do. It's a great example of a group reaching a critical mass such that it self-supports itself. Brilliant!

In answer to when we might see the chicks fledging, my money would be ona date around 6th June 2009. There will be plenty of city centre activity and excitement to be had around that time for anyone wanting to come to Derby.

If our ringers are keen and able to abseil down to ring the chicks again this year (which I'm sure they will be keen to do), it's usually around when they are c20 days old. i.e. about 18-20 May.

For those of you planning future visits to Derby, is there anything about our City that you'd like us to like us to collate and make available for you so the time spent on your visit is used most effectively? I'm sure we can pull something together on tourist resources, travel diections, car parking, museums and walks, wildlife sites in Derbyshire, hotels etc. Of course, if you can find all you need online, fine, it saves us a big task. But if you've been struggling, or had problems when you last came, let us know and we'll see what we can do to help.

Our Tourist Information Centre is 2 minutes walk from the Cathedral. http://www.visitderby.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 1332 255802

I'll update our timetable comparing the last 3 years and post it when I get a moment. Meanwhile, it's back to redecorating the hallway and stairs of our house. Oh, the joys of damp UK Bank Holidays.

Ann, Birmingham said...

Is it as cold, windy & damp in Derby as it is here in Brum? If so, do the parents change shifts more often, to keep themselves warm? It must be difficult keeping the circulation up to scratch when you're almost immobile for a long while.

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Good question. I'n not aware that they change shifts any more frequently, Ann. In fact in wet cold, wet weather I think they tend to stay put so as to keep the chicks warm and dry. I don't think anyone has timed the shifts chanegs and tried to correlate with temperature.
Of course, peregrines are cliff and mountain crag birds. They evolved and lived in far harsher environments than our town centres. So I doubt that a bit of Bank Holiday weather bothers them at all.

Terry, Herts UK said...

@Sarah C: I understand what you say & you put your view very politely. I think we're very lucky so far on this blog in that it never seems to get spammed or trolled. If it is, the team are doing an amazing job in removing any offensive or wildly off-topic comments.

After all, a bit of chit-chat here and there is doing no harm and it only takes a minute or two to read the latest comments.

Over the last year or two there were blog entries from pigeon fanciers, for example, who despise the Peregrines for obvious reasons. They weren't censored. It opened up a whole new area of debate.

If this blog serves another purpose - perhaps by enabling people who share their admiration of these creatures to make new friendships - that's all to the good, imho.

By the same token, it's good you took the time to speak your mind. But I would hate this blog to descend into a debate about who can say what. Seems to me it's OK, just as it is :)

Terry, Herts UK said...

To the team: Just wondering if it may be possible this year to give a few days notice of when ringing might take place?

I've yet to visit Derby but would love to do so for this special event. Can't be certain I'll be able to do so but the more notice the better, unless there are security or other reasons for not doing so, of course.

chrisx said...

Sarah C: I respectfully agree with Terry and the rest - there really is very little chit-chat and it is lovely to make new friends. A bit of extra info helps place people in context. Cheer up! Chill - as the kids would say :-)

Ann, Birmingham said...

@ Project Member, Derby Museum
Yes, I overlooked their natural habitat - probably transposing my own chilliness onto them. Anthropomorphism very much out of place in this context!

Roger (AT) said...

Well said Terry! For me the key is "respect for difference". We cannot all have high IQ's, write nice English, or express ourselves succinctly. Some know lots about X and others about Y. The blog lets us share our Peregrinal interests, and co-operate. The sharers can feel the warm glow of having done a good turn, the sharees learn what they want to know, and get a warm glow from someone being considerate towards them.
I must say that this is the best blog I take part in! A "travellers" blog I look at has degenerated into hostility and verbal warfare!
Above all we must have fun, and keep the blog a pleasant place to be. That will help make the hosting of the nest platform more secure for the future.

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Re. the ringing of the chicks: in past years we have kept this rather low profile because it does involve disturbance and the female bird flies about screaming quite a lot all the while - though she settles down quickly once the chicks are back and the ringers have gone. This can cause some concern by people down below though the ringing process is tried and tested and the ringers are very experienced as well as properly licenced to do this work.
The timing of the ringing is entirely up to the ringers, their availability (both work) and getting the chicks at more or less the right ages and finally the right weather for abseiling down. If the chicks are too small - the rings fall off, too large/old and there is a risk of them jumping from the nest. So, although each year is different, it will be very difficult to forecast when the ringing will take place. The other annoying thing for people watching from below is that there is very little to see apart from a man on a rope lowering and then raising a rucksack with the (unseen) chicks in it.
The chicks are ringed as quickly as possibly (and on the nave roof unseen from below) so taking them elsewhere to 'show the public' would not be wise since the parents would be distressed for longer.
Hope that explains things a bit!
Nick B (DWT)

Terri said...

Yes I agree, it's good to keep the blog varied and interesting yet entertaining at the same time. As long as it doesn't turn into some sort of glorified chat room and lose sight of its main purpose.
Anyway, please can I add my voice to Terry (Herts) who asked for notice of ringing - I might like to visit Derby to witness such events, especially if I'm in the Nottingham area on that day, it's only a quick trip down the A52.

Terri said...

Nick, our comments crossed in the post... Yes I thought you might say something like that :) I'll try to schedule a visit some time soon anyway.

Sue in Bucks said...

re the ringing, if memory serves me correctly, I believe the web cam is also briefly switched off at that time in order to save all of us viewers having communal nervous breakdowns! (we all get so jittery with the hatching and the fledging, I don't think we could handle the abseil) Somebody mentioned previous years fledging/falling - as I mentioned a few weeks ago, there's still seems to be the episode of 2008 "Tiddler, 007" accessible at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7462310.stm

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Oh god I couldn't cope if any of them fell from the nest, is it likely??

Terry, Herts UK said...

May I just recommend any of my fellow watchers who haven't seen this to take a look at Colin's blog/pictures? Click on the images for the full photos.

Colin's blogFor me, it shows another part of the jigsaw. Whilst watching the webcams and noticing that the male is often absent, it's easy to assume he's just gone hunting or lazing about somewhere ! Apparently not ! He's been very busy indeed.

Nick Brown (DWT) said...

Sorry to have alarmed some of you re. the ringing. No there is no chance of a chick falling if the ringing is done at the correct time - which it will be. There are risks of the four chicks accidenally knocking one of their number from the platform especially when they are exercising their wings just befow being ready to fledge but they would land quite unharmed on the nave roof below from where they could easily be rescued...so please don't worry...
We have had no 'accidents' in the three years so far and I can't see any reason why we should have one this year - certainly not at the ringing! The ringers have ringed hundreds of rapor chicks over many years and know exactly what they need to do.
Nick B (DWT)

Fi arowsmith said...

I'm absolutely sure that all involved know what they are doing but thankyou for putting my mind at rest, it's been very easy to become attatched to these little bundles!

Roger (AT) said...

@ Nick-B: Do you have any idea what could have bothered the Peregrines last night? I think it was the falcon on the nest, and for 2 hours she was staring out of the nest apparently watching something that moved around. She made a few sorties out of the nest but was quickly back. I wondered if it could be an owl, or the juvenile that Colin reported?

Ann, Birmingham said...

They're being fed a bird with a green/turquoise ring on its leg. A racing pigeon?

Kishore said...

I'vwe been watching the feeding - it appears the chick at the back is out of favour for the food. The chicks at the front seems to be getting most of the feed. Has anyone else noticed that?

Anonymous said...

What species is the dead bird at the bottom right of the webcam (left hand camera) - Monday 4 May 2009 at 17.32?

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 9.39am
logged onto my computer just in time for feeding time, the close up shots were amazing, mum seems to get around to feeding them all,
maybe the ones who hatched first need a bit more food as they grow.

Roger (AT) said...

I could not decide if the Tiddler was at the back, or was the chick on the right! Can you tell by the size of their eyes? They seem to be developing fast.
Nick-M (I expect) was kind enough to zoom in on the chicks just as I was about to snap a shot. Thanks! Picture posted on Flickr. Yes Ann, dinner was married, but what species? too hard for me.

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Well all moved safe and sound but slightly exhausted. Thanks for all the well wishes. Thanks to Mother Nature for the last hatch before we moved. Not got our computer hooked up yet, using our daughters. Will there be a D.V.D. made of this years birds?
Ann

Anonymous said...

Hi Roger (AT) Thanks for all the information, I did try it like this earlier but didn't know how to change the size. They say you learn something everyday. I am a senior surfer anyway but do pride myself on telling or should I say helping my hubbie work the computer (anything technical I seem to do).

Many thanks this is great I can watch and type. Hope this helps others. Joy

Kishore said...

Feeding time at Worcester

Ann, Birmingham said...

Thanks Kishore, I got a great view of the chicks. They're getting a bit heftier now aren't they?

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 10.57am
Ann (Canada) glad the move went ok,
sent you an E.mail :)there was a wonderful feed time , did you see it?

Terry, Herts UK said...

Just watched another feed. Plenty to go round. All the babies got a good share. Then Mum flew off, presumably to have some to herself.

Incredible to think these birds were verging on extinction a few years ago and now we're able to witness their most intimate moments.

Ann, Birmingham said...

A longer feed here, lasted over 10 mins. I think, I lost track. It's amazing how careful the parent is to fill each beak at least once. Couldn't see what the prey was, other than a smallish bird, and it's been taken away now.

Fi Arrowsmith said...

I see that Kishore is keeping an eye on Worcester too, they are getting so big already! just watched supper in Derby, very tasty i'm sure! i haven't noticed that any are being left out, i'm sure she will make sure they all get some. She must be exhausted with it all!

Sue in Bucks said...

Oops, I can see I inadvertently led people into confusing ringing with chicks falling. No, the ringing has always proceeded perfectly. The camara feed has been turned off just to avoid the shock of the innocent watcher suddenly seeing a pair of human legs dangling towards the platform!
Last year, when the chicks fledged, there were some initial crash landings. As it was suggested the edge of the platform could have been the culprit, this year it was adjusted to an optimum width, so with a bit of luck, that first flight should go perfectly. I was just making the point that if you all thought there was anxiety with the eggs hatching, just wait and see how you feel about first flight!
Nick M - you ask what the team could do to help visitors. I can't think of anything except perhaps a training session or handout on how to tackle this flickr effort!! I've not got my head around this at all (I'm feeling quite self satisfied that I FINALLY got around to capturing screen shots for myself!!)

Nick Brown (wildlife trust) said...

Roger AT: I've no idea what was disturbing the female during the night. There are no owls in the immediate vicinity and I doubt any intruder would appear during darkness....but who knows?
Could possibly have been the male nearby...certainly doubt the birds were in any danger.
Ann: Sorry but there won't be another DVD this year...for all sorts of reasons. The existing one tells the story very well and of course, for newcomers to this site, is still available from either the cathedral or museum shops in town or by post from the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust by phoning 01773 881188 in office hours and making a transaction using your debit/credit card.....as with donations.
The DVD costs £9.95 if my memory serves me correctly.....and of that money, thanks to the generosity of the producing company, the project gets £9 for each one sold!
Nick B (DWT)

Nick Brown (wildlife trust) said...

Correction: DVD is £9.99 and is post fee in the UK.
Nick B (DWT)

n1ck said...

tonights feed (bank hoilday banquet) can now be found on flickr for those that missed it or want another look enjoy

Anonymous said...

Called in at Derby Cathedral earlier today to have a closer look at the Project. Everything is so organised there! Had a wonderful trip up the tower, stopping off at the bell-ringing room and watching the 'live' screen view - just in time to see the afternoon feed (3.00-ish). Also saw the 10 bells (the oldest set of 10 in the world) and the clock mechanism. Thank you to John and Tony for your expert knowledge on all things peregrine and Derby related, it was absolutely fantastic! If any of you out there get a chance to go up the tower (and I believe it is open again on 25 May) don't hesitate to do it - at only £5, it was the best value for money I've had for ages. Sue A, Derby

Project Member (Derby Cathedral) said...

Thanks Sue, good to meet you today -always nice to put a face to a name!
It was a slow day - sorry to Sue in Bucks but I didn't decide to do anything until Friday!!
Yes we do plan another day on May 25th (Bank Holiday Monday) this time combined with a Watch Point and I hope the Coffee Shop will be open . More details later but more notice this time!!!
Also, on behalf of the Team, may I thank you Sue for your donation - it is the generosity of people like you that enables us to continue this very important, and fascinating, work.
Tony

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 1.12pm
just looked in on the Columbus Ohio chics and the four of them look like there thriving :)

Anonymous said...

The Ohio chicks are having a long group hug.

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Finally had time to sit and look at the pics on Colins blog, they are brilliant, Colin clearly has a damn good camera!! The male certainly has been busy, way to go daddy!!

Sue in Bucks said...

OK Derby Cathedral - I forgive you about the tower climb. See you on the 25th though!
Speaking of the Derby peregrines' breeding success, the team in Lincoln just very kindly emailed me with news that their watch point is now open. Their pair have only hatched the two young though, so it shows how well Derby have done.
Now, I MUST get on and do my Law studies work .......

Anonymous said...

Thanks to you all at the Derby Project Team .I have watched and donated since the number on site was 12,2059 it is today 21,5407, if only some of those donated £1, it would be great.
Cherrill Kegworth

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 3.05pm
Just saw a feeding time in Ohio
Is 4 eggs the most a falcon can lay?

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

@pax, Canada
Three or four eggs in a clutch is the norm. The "bible" on peregrines is Derek Ratcliffes's 1993 2nd edition of "The Peregrine Falcon" which states that clutches of five eggs occur occasionally, but that there had been only four UK records of six eggs in a clutch. There was one record in North America of a clutch of seven!

@Ann, Birmingham
I'm not quite sure which view you would have been looking at when you asked what was in the bottom right corner of the main nest camera. We have a black metal strap which gives physical support to the nest platform which cuts diagonally down across the bottom right corner. Even further into the right is a wooden divider which separates the deep pea gravel for the nest scrape from the shallow welsh slate bottom of the other, currently unoccupied part of the platform. Does this answer your question, or have I missed something? (Haven't actually watched the cameras much today)
Oops - just spotted a later comment saying there was a bird there. Oh well, I'll leave this up in case it's of interest.

We've had 41 different species of prey recorded in Derby. I did hear some eports recently of our peregrines nipping round the side of the tower and taking squabs (baby feral pigeons) from nests elsewhere on the stonework. This is probably somethng to keep an eye out for by those able to get to Cathedral Green in Derby to see our birds for themselves.

What are everyone's favourite moments of the weekend action that you'd like to see on video? Give me a day and local time and I'll see if I can get a film clip posted over the next couple of days.

Anonymous said...

Just off to bed myself thought I would take a look at the Peregrins. Mother I presume is fast asleep with head tucked under her wings, no sign of life. Looks so peaceful. Joy

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 6.47pm
Momma looks a lot quieter tonight, and papa is on the pudding cam
Thanks for answering my question :)

Terry, Herts UK said...

Watch this vid in HD if you can, with sound on:

Rhode Island Peregrines

Terry, Herts UK said...

Just watched another feed. All 4 look well and Mum made sure they all got a share.

Dad was asleep up on the tower but has now disappeared, presumably gone hunting.

Roger (AT) said...

This morning's breakfast was early - and for those who worry that Tiddler might not get enough food, just look at the shots on Flickr. Tiddler started at the back, missed the first few offerings, and to my dismay was next looking in the wrong direction, and laying sideways through the siblings. No worries - up popped Tiddler's beak and got fed. But there was a cunning plan afoot. Tiddler wriggled through, got into pole position and was well rewarded for the trouble. As Terry says - all the chicks got fed well. Nick-B That feeding might prove a good one to capture. Then we can all see how wrong my analysis was!

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Just loked at the pics of breakfast, could Tiddler be a girl?? Feisty and not to be pushed out!! Either way, well done Tiddler and well done Mummy! All four look contended, they are so lovely!

Karen Anne said...

Colin,

I just looked at your blog posting again about Dad driving off the intruding female. The female was one of the young from last year? (I have lost track of the gender of last year's young, I though there was one female and she vanished?)

Terry,

Great RI video pointer. There is a version at
videowithout the leaf border covering up the edges.

Roger (AT) said...

I guess we may lose track of which chick is Tiddler. In a few days the birthday difference will be less apparent, unless of course Tiddler is the only male, and stays clearly the smallest. (1 chance in 16 I think?).
Perhaps one of the team will kindly put a ribbon or blob of paint on Tiddler's leg the next time they are strolling past the nest?

Colin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

chicks fed at 9.35 All had a good feed, dad popped in and had a quick look.

Roger (AT) said...

Just saw another feeding session. Sorry only time for 1 screenshot, but ... Yes ... Tiddler at the front and lucky.

n1ck said...

Roger (AT) thanks for the early feed shots on flickr there great very early start for mum and dad

Terry, Herts UK said...

Thanks, Karen Anne. That link is much better than mine :)

The birds are stunningly beautiful to see, especially in the last few seconds, perched on the railing. Also, a perfect demo of the difference in size between the falcon and the tiercel as they perch, side by side.

Anonymous said...

Just logged on again to see the end of what appeared to be the end of another feed. This Atkins diet is certainly working!!!Dad visited again for a moment

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Lovely to see them all snuggly and warm under mum,I'm yet to catch a feed today. I'm just looking with my two year old daughter and she now wants me to draw a peregrine........

Kishore said...

The chicks don't fit under the belly of mum/dad anymore. Signs they're getting bigger?? If you watch them on a daily basis perhaps you don't notice them getting bigger. Same scenario with the Worcester ones.

Terri said...

I was just thinking that very same thought Kishore! They're growing unbelievably quick aren't they, which is giving us a better view as more of them pokes out from under mum's belly. Both parents doing a spectacular job, but they've had plenty of practice over the last few years I suppose. I wonder how many more years they will be able to reproduce. And when they get too old, will a pair of younger peregrine falcons take over their ready-made nest site? I know it's a long way in the future but has anyone pondered this before?

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

They are growing at a rate of knots, i was just thinking this morning that the Worcester mum looks like she's sitting on a white fluffy cushion! It's great we can see more of the chicks. good point about the breeding age etc, now i'm pondering!

Ann, Birmingham said...

@ Project Member (Derby Museum)- Re "the thing in the bottom right corner": I'd thought it was a bit of plastic litter at first as it seemed transparent (this might have been an optical illusion), but it didn't flap or flutter in the breeze. The view of the nest was close-up and a bit fuzzy. It might just have been shadow or the bird someone else mentioned (dead).
Thanks for all the info. about prey, they eat more species of meat than I do! I suggested a racing pigeon because we recently had one visit our garden with a mob of ferals. It had a black ring on the right leg and a turquoise green one on the left. Its markings were symmetrical and very striking, unlike your average feral. And I remembered that pigeon fanciers aren't keen on peregrines...
Thanks for your detailed replies; I'm so glad I found this site, I've learned so much and it's so friendly here. And of course, those amazing birds & chicks just keep me hooked.

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

I have to agree with Ann, this is a great site and for a novice like myself it's wonderful to be learning so much. It's also a fabulous way to get kiddies involved with such an amazing part of nature. My sons school are now keeping a close eye on the peregrines which is so pleasing. It's so important that they grow up with a love and respect of these beautiful birds.

Terry, Herts UK said...

One reason why it's so important that an adult is sitting on the brood is that after hatching, the young can't self-regulate their body heat, I believe. I can't recall how long it takes them to be able to do so, but I think it's just a few days. Meantime, Mum & Dad need to keep them warm.

Right now, it looks to me that it's the tiercel on duty which makes the fast-growing eyases look even more squashed beneath him.

Watching will become even more addictive in the next few days, once the little 'uns start to be more inquisitive and won't need to be sheltered so much. :)

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

oooh afternoon snack! All seem to be getting a good 'tum full'! Tiddler right at the front again!

Anonymous said...

Fiona, how can you tell who's Tiddler? Size of the body? Jennie, Hong Kong.

Anonymous said...

Just seemed that the bird carcass got mixed up with chicks and all looked a tangled mess around adult bird. Hopefully now sorted.

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Jennie,
yes that's what i'm assuming, he/she is quite teeny compared to the others.
I couldn't believe how quickly they devoured the bird, it was hardly a carcass left just stringy bits, incredible..........

n1ck said...

latest pics on flickr they were telling tales on each other
hope you enjoy these ones

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Pics are great Nick, little Tinkers!!

Anonymous said...

Something odd going on. Around 5.35 both the falcon on the nest and the tiercel above were distracted by something moving around in the sky – both watching very closely. First the tiercel took off, then, surprisingly, so did the falcon. As I type, at 5.50, both are still away and the youngsters are still home alone..
RJ

Ann, Birmingham said...

Super pics, Nick. They've been left alone for several minutes now.

andy said...

This is great stuff,cant wait to get home to see how things are going.i think more councils up and down the country should look into encouraging these superb birds into their cities

Roger (AT) said...

Mum back 17:58

There is something around that makes them uneasy.

Anonymous said...

5.54 (5.58 camera time) and falcon is back (well, I hope it’s her). Wonder what went on..
RJ

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Could it be the young female intruder?

Anonymous said...

Babes home alone again. How long before they get cold.

Anonymous said...

Parent just back with dinner. Phew!

Ann, Birmingham said...

Plenty to go round with that whopping bird!

Anonymous said...

I'm only seeing 3 chicks or is it my eyes??

Anonymous said...

What is that prey?? Almost looks like a frog! Long legged thing – heron chick? (added to flickr)
RJ

Dave Arrowsmith said...

Is it a moor hen?

Anonymous said...

Think you might be right, Dave, good call. Wonder how it was caught? On the wing?

Terri said...

I thought I could only count 3 heads at that last feed ..??!?!?!?! I hope Tiddler hasn't been suffocated by the other 3. Or has one of them managed to waddle over to the other part of the nest box?

Anonymous said...

Has anyone else only seen 3? surely if one had waddled over to other side she would fetch it back?? Took my eyes off to leave comment when something spooked her and she flew off, hope nothing has taken one of the chicks, was anyone watching all the time?? I'm very worried

Roger (AT) said...

No there are all 4 there! I waited for a better shot to show them all clearly, but the micreant was huddled behind the others.

Terry, Herts UK said...

I can understand your anxiety but I'm fairly sure I spotted 4 beaks at the last feed. Peregrines are pretty much at the top of their food chain and it's highly unlikely any of the chicks would be taken. They're safe up there :)

It won't be long before the babies start venturing around the scrape but it's too early yet, especially for tiddler who probably needs the warmth of his siblings more than the others.

Having said all that, I agree that in the last few minutes, the falcon does seem a bit cross about something in the sky and keeps looking around. Dad is back up on the tower now though, so I guess it's nothing too threatening or he would be out there, defending their territory.

Anonymous said...

Thank the Lord, I was getting upset at the thoughts that one may be missing, I can have a glass of wine now and breathe a sigh of relief !

Terry, Herts UK said...

There were some great photos posted last year of one of the parents seeing off a Buzzard. Anyone remember the link to those pictures?

If not, I'll do some digging later.

Roger (AT) said...

@ Terry: search the blog for buzzard and it is there.
19th Aug 2008. Title Juveniles out and about

Terry, Herts UK said...

Cheers, Roger !

here's the link

Iain said...

hi all great to see the chicks doing so well i did ask last year but got no response do the adult birds have names?????

Roger (AT) said...

Hey Terry. That was good suggestion .. I never knew a buzzard could fly upside-down, to keep the peregrines off with his talons. In serious trouble here for laughing too loudly!

Terry, Herts UK said...

Roger,

In looking back at that page, I came across this, which I had forgotten about.

click hereStill makes me smile.

Watch as a slideshow and don't take the comments too seriously ! These juvenile Peregrines were part of the brood of 4, hatched in Rochester, NY, in 2007.

Great photography, too :)

Anonymous said...

That slide show was very funny ! Just the scene in my back garden. LOL. Oh by the way the adults names are Christine & Steve x

Roger (AT) said...

Thanks Terry - well worth looking at. A great set of shots, and I loved the photo-shopped ending! (You were right about the comments).

@ Anon: "Christine & Steve" - is that a joke? I have never seen any references to the Derby peregrines having names. Makes them sound like a couple you met down the pub last night :)

Terry, Herts UK said...

Iain,

The birds don't have names as such. It's been debated over the last couple of years, but the concensus has been not to name them.

However, you will often hear people unofficially refer to the adults as Mr & Mrs P...and the youngest of the brood affectionately known as Tiddler ;)

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Oooh supper, it's that funny thing again, it looks like a moorhen.......

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

well whatever it is i'm sure they will find it delicious! Think i'll stick to quiche for tea!!

Roger (AT) said...

Are you watching Terri and Anon? Clearly 4 chicks getting second serving of moorhen!
I popped as screenshot on Flickr to reassue you.

Ann, Birmingham said...

I do hope it doesn't mean two sets of orphaned moorhen chicks today...I much prefer it when they get feral pigeons, they're such pests.

Anonymous said...

But moorhens have green legs. What we really need is more magpies in their diet - lol.
Alan 165

Terry, Herts UK said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Roger (AT) said...

That was the longest feed I have seen 16 minutes roughly. I think it was the second serving from the same bird Ann. I am glad they enjoyed their tea - I was so absorbed watching that I just cooked my two "soft" boiled eggs for 20 minutes. The dog will be pleased.

Colin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Terry, Herts UK said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Message for Ruth Z. You left a note on Colin's blog that says you are still having problems with a "frozen camera" and can only see the small picture on Streamdays. Since my own problem a few days ago on the main website and a recommendation to use Streamdays, if you click on "see enhanced picture" you get the original size picture of the nesting platform and the camera moves on all the time. (Touch wood) I have had no problem since going through Streamdays following the recommendation and clicking the "enhanced picture". Try it!

Anonymous said...

Interesting attempted feed. Tiercel arrived with the remains of the moorhen (?) Falcon was having none of it, and so he and his picnic were duly dispatched. (pic to flickr added). Given that was the third time we’ve seen the carcass, any idea where it is being stored?
RJ

Roger (AT) said...

These peregrines are better than TV. (And not only for the lack of adverts).
One parent just brought the food back again, not a flicker of interest from the chicks, but much swearing from the sitting bird. He/she cluttered off with it again.
One can clearly see that they can be angry, gentle, loving - I wonder if they can be embarassed?

Good news Colin - can we expect some more fine photos on your blog? I take it you have not seen any reason for the birds to be edgy? They seem very relaxed now.

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 3.23pm
chicks on their own

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada
Mmomma is back :)

Ann, Birmingham said...

She's been away for a while & all four were visible. Now she's back & tucking them in.

Karen Anne said...

Roger, the San Jose, California peregrines were Jose Fernando and Clara de Guadalupe a couple of years ago.

The males have not been doing too well there. The next year Clara's consort was Carlos, and this year he is Esteban Colbert.

But I think they have been raising chicks each year. I don't really follow that nest.

Karen Anne said...

By the way, feliz cinco de mayo, peeps.

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 9.56pm
just caught a feed, looks like the prey was big

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada 11.52pm
feeding time again

Kishore said...

Feed time - love to know what's on the menu.

Anonymous said...

Pax Canada
poppa on the pudding cam, and I do mean on the cam :)

Fiona Arrowsmith said...

Is daddy feeling vain this morning??!

Terri said...

Yes I see what you mean about daddy on the pudding cam, LOL. Thanks for reassuring me that all 4 chicks are safe, I must admit I was getting quite worried at one stage.

Ann, Birmingham said...

Hi everyone, Dad certainly looks fierce close up especially when he's facing the camera. Can anyone explain why it's called the "pudding" cam?

Terry, Herts UK said...

Hello Ann,

It was named pudding cam just because of its shape:

http://derbyperegrines.blogspot.com/2008/01/pudding-cam.html

Ann, Birmingham said...

@ Terry, Herts., Thanks for that. I see it's feeding time again but can't tell what hapless bird's on the elevenses menu. Time for mine!

Ann, Birmingham said...

Did anyone see that chick come half-out from under a wing & poke about in the gravel? Getting curious about its surroundings!

Ann, Birmingham said...

On 2nd.thoughts, it was probably looking for a bit more grub...

Ann ( Canada ) said...

Well up and running again on my own computer. Nice to have it back online. Lots been going on I did keep a check from time to time on our daughters computer. Hope that none of the chicks have to be rescued this year from the pub etc. Do hope Dad peregrine is ok and able to go for food. Still unable to figure out how to crop pictures I capture with PAINT If anyone has easy step by step instructions I would appreciate it very much. Thanks in advance.

John B (not the sloop) said...

Anne (Canada)

Having pasted your screen grab into Paint, use the "square box" selection tool to frame the part you want keep; Do [edit][copy] then [file][new] to open a new blank "Paint" file. You can let the old one close without saving. Then do [edit][paste]. Your nicely cropped image should now be avaiable to save.