Tuesday, 26 June 2007

Where Are They Now?

Juvenile doing a bird-of-paradise impersonation on a Derby roof. Photo I.Forrest
window inside Derby Cathedral Whilst the webcams will now be emptier, the skies over Derby will be made richer with the presence of our young birds as they learn the skills of their parents.

Our birds? We can never own them, of course. But we can watch and learn from them. It's in human hands that the future of so much of our wildlife now rests, and that's a responsibility we all shoulder. It’s been a privilege for those of us on the project team to have shared a flake of these young birds’ lives. (see also my recent comment.)

Rest assured that we will keep watching and reporting on their location and progress here. We know many photographers will continue to send in great pictures, like Ian's above. We've much more to share with you. Later, you may be interested to learn a little more about Derby and the partners in this project, so we'll post some special blog entries about them.

Lapwing at The Sanctuary with football ground behind. Photo S.Whitehead Meanwhile, if you live locally and would like a chance to visit another of Derby City's wildlife projects, there's a rare chance to go inside
Sanctuary Location Map  meet just inside car park entrance
The Sanctuary for a guided tour of Derby's first bird reserve. It's on Thursday evening 28th June from 7pm - 9pm. Meet inside the Park and Ride car park next to the County Football ground on Pride Park. Its free, and part of Derby City Partnership Week.

Post-script:
Manning the Watch Point today, it was clear that our two young birds are becoming stronger fliers, and so the rescue equipment has been retired. For a while before noon both birds settled on the roof of the nearby Silk Mill Museum. Then 002, who fledged yesterday flew, around the Green and tried to land on the side of the Cathedral Tower. This she failed to do, and fluttered down and then flew to the apex of the nave roof, giving us all great views.. Then Mum flew off, returning a while later with a large prey item which she plucked on top of the tower and eventually flew down with it to the roof. She returned soon after to her observation point, and the prey was eagerly eaten by the young falcon. Meanwhile 001 (that’s the ring number) remained on the Museum roof, perhaps idly watching the rising waters of the River Derwent in spate. The adult male was also keeping a careful watch on his charges from the Tower, and we left the Green confident that the recent terrible weather had not affected their chances of survival.
At 7.30pm Andy & Chris Marshall left a comment that both chicks were doing fine. One was sat high up on the cathedral on the next gargoyle to "dad" and the other was sat on top of the Silk Mill tower on the opposite side of Cathedral Green. "Mum" flew in past the Silk Mill calling to the chick before landing next to her mate.

27 comments:

Karen Anne said...

Oops - posted this in an old thread -

There is still someone below the nest as posted earlier in the left camera view. So nice to see somebody still, whoever it is - one of the fledglings? Can anyone on the ground tell?

The fledgings are being fed by the parents?

Steph said...

wow that second paragraph of todays blog sounded almost riduculing. perhaps by feeling some connection to them will help us to respect wildlife. what is the point of building up this relationship to then throw it back at us. i don't consider myself or anyone else to own them but yes i do consider them to be our birds, derbys birds, something to be proud of.

Anonymous said...

I just want to say a huge thank you to everyone at the Derby Cathedral Peregrine Project. It has been such a privilege to have had a glimpse into the lives of these wonderful birds,thank you.

Anonymous said...

Thanks ot all involved with this wonderful project. As I have been homebound for the last 3 months, you provided me with a great escape to pass my time. Good luck to you and the Birds. From Worcester, Massachusetts USA

Andrew @ Derby said...

Just been for a walk around the Cathedral. I'm no expert so I can't tell who is who, but there is someone on the south side of the tower now, and two had been perched on top of a nearby church tower a short time ago. The weather is nice today, just a little breezy at times so I hope they are having a good time learning to fly. As said by others, a big thank you to the Project organisers!

Anonymous said...

I thought I saw a peregrine falcon (recognised by the size + it's tail feathers) high in a tree near Leaper Street in Derby last night/evening. Though I believe one or two falcons were seen back at the nest afterwards.

Anonymous said...

having major withdrawal symptons where are the birds now? are they around cathedral area?, its no good i am going to have to go down to the green to have a look out for them really miss them.

Anonymous said...

I just want to say thankyou to everyone who have been taking part in this project. Without your effort, we would not have had such an experience watching the birds, especially for people like me living in a commercial city. It is really amazing! Thankyou again. May God bless OUR BIRDS. Jennie, Hong Kong

sam said...

Must agree with Steph, I too think your second paragraph was a little patronising, im sure we are all aware that these wonderful birds are fully wild and belong to no one. however Im sure we are all allowed a little swell of pride in thinking of them as Derby birds, after all we were encouraged to do so, were we not?

Anonymous said...

Sam. I dont think the writer meant any slight to any who have been watching the birds progress they were merely correcting their first paragraph. :-)
We all grew close to these chicks, watching them grow and progress, I know I named them in my mind, for a short while we were part of their lives, and a little like children, they now have to make their way in the world.
Thank you for the experience.
B.C. Canada

Anonymous said...

Don't be too hard on 'our' Project Manager. I think he's only trying to point out that when we form attachments (when we call objects, people, animals, etc. 'ours') we find it so much more painful to let them go. A bit like when our children are growing up, and we end up needing to control them. I hope that makes sense.

The empty nest seems such a cold remote place without our family in it.

Anna, Ripley

Anonymous said...

I just want to thank the whole projct team for what has been a great chance to watch Falcon Chicks. It really has been a wonderful experience. Thanks to you all. Alan from Crawley

Karen Anne said...

Thank you very much for this wonderful webcam and all your hard work. I know people have put in long hours on this wonderful project.

Anonymous said...

I hate to see such a wonderful project delta a blow by one not well thought out paragraph. Of course you should have named our birds, if you think that’s not the case think of what “Pale Male” of NYC’s Central Park has done for bird of prey conservation world wide.

Tom, Newport News, Virginia USA

Karen Anne said...

I think some folks are over reacting. I see that paragraph as being possibly taken several ways. Unfortunately, on the web, we can't hear intonations. It is an infinitesimal in terms of the whole project.

Let's move on and appreciate the wonderful birds and all the hard work that has gone into this. We folks are sitting here in our jammies, and the project guys are slaving away. Let's appreciate everything they have done.

Speaking of the birds, any updates on how they are doing?

Anonymous said...

20:03 and someone is back on the edge of the box, sorry can't tell which one any ideas anyone if its one of the young or an adult.

Anonymous said...

20:10 One chick(?) is back or is it 'dad' - it looks a bit dark colouring???

Anonymous said...

20:22 Bird flew off.
J

Karen Anne said...

Hopefully the ground folks can fill us in on what's been happening today.

Anonymous said...

I have spent a wonderful few hours over the last few weeks visiting Derby to see the Peregrines. I feel priviliged to have had the chance to experience the journey of their lives. Thank you to all involved in the whole project.

Anonymous said...

Good evening peregrine watchers. For all you "empty nesters", I can report that as of 7.30 this evening both chicks are alive and well. One was sat high up on the cathedral on the next gargoyle to "dad" and the other was sat on top of the Silk Mill tower on the opposite side of Cathedral Green. "Mum" flew in past the Silk Mill calling to the chick before landing next to her mate.

Andy & Chris Marshall

Anonymous said...

I have also enjoyed watching the web-cam over recent times and shall certainly miss seeing the day to day activities.

However, I agree with one of the comments given by the public that the comment in the "blog" by the project manager was inappropriate and in my opinion totally unnecessary.

Anonymous said...

i agree with anna from ripley the project manager meant no harm he was merely stating we should be thankful to have helped conserve more of these lovely birds and move on without getting attached and be ready for the next brood (i hope there will be another brood next year) well done to all of you and yes we are proud of these birds as we will be of future birds, so glad the babies are alive and well thanks to the informers for the updates.

Anonymous said...

Three cheers, congratulations, well done and thank you for an experience that was informative, emotional and heartwarming.Give yourselves a pat on the back. Roll on next April. Mike in Bracknell.

Anonymous said...

To both Nicks, is it not time based upon the number of hits and love of these birds by the public that the DWT should set up a team of DWT members and others to ensure that this project takes place each year and that if you all drop dead that a group can pick up a file and go forward and continue your first class work? tony

Project Member (Derby Museum) said...

Oops. My apologies if the words chosen in the last entry caused irritation. I re-read them and agree they did sound patronising, though that was the farthest intention. So I’ve changed them. (I think I was getting carried away with the emotion of the moment, having come towards the end of so many months of hard work whilst listening to a range of CD music to consider using as a background to a video compilation I thought it might be nice to put together of our season’s activities. It probably won’t happen, but at least I can blame “Show of Hands” as well as the Derby Cathedral Choir for sending me off in a reverie!) Am I forgiven?

And in answer to the last comment, it has already been agreed that, once the metaphorical dust has settled, the City Council's Museum Service, the Wildlife Trust and the Cathedral authorities will indeed sit down and draw up a more formal arrangement to ensure the project carries forward in future years, irrespective of who is involved. That agreement won't aim to deliver all the extras that we've seen this year, as this has required a huge voluntary effort by so many people, but it will look to identify the main elements each partner needs to deliver to ensure the peregrine project continues in some form in the years to come, giving pleasure and interest to many people as it has so obviously done in 2007. And that interest has been our reward.

Anonymous said...

7.47 Thursday morning. Just checked the cameras and one bird is sat on the nesting ledge